Nagauta Symphony

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The Nagauta Symphony is a symphony in one movement composed in 1934 by Japanese composer Kosaku Yamada.

Description[edit]

Kosaku Yamada was the first major Japanese composer to study the European tradition, and the first to write in the symphonic and operatic forms.[1] He was responsible for introducing Japanese audiences to much of the European orchestral tradition through his conducting.[2] In his compositions, Yamada had been working to combine European traditions with Japanese classical music since at least 1921, when he composed Inno Meiji which combined Japanese and western instruments.[1] Composed in 1934, the Nagauta Symphony represented the culmination of this work.[3]

For this work, Yamada composed music for the western orchestra which is used to counterpoint a classical nagauta, the music which accompanies the kabuki.[4] The symphony is subtitled Tsurukame after the name of the nagauta which is used.[3] Composed in 1857,[4] the text celebrates the Emperor of Japan and the imperial court.[3] The symphony is in one movement with a duration of approximately 17 minutes.[3]

Instrumentation[edit]

The Nagauta Symphony uses a western orchestra and voices, as well as an ensemble of traditional Japanese musical instruments.[4] The Japanese ensemble consists of several shamisen and percussion.[3]

Recordings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Katayama, Morihide. ""Yamada, Koscak Biography"". Naxos Records. Retrieved 2008-05-16. 
  2. ^ Lim, Vincent (2008-05-08). "European Classical Meets Japanese Nagauta". UCLA. Retrieved 2008-05-16. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Lange, Art (2008-05-08). "Yamada: Nagauta Symphony, Etc / Miyata, Ajimi, Yuasa, et al.". ArkivMusic. Retrieved 2008-05-16. 
  4. ^ a b c "KÓSÇAK YAMADA (1886-1965): Nagauta Symphony "Tsurukame", Sinfonia "Inno Meiji", Choreographic Symphony "Maria Magdalena".". Records International. Retrieved 2008-05-16.