Nagma

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Nagma
Heroine Nagma.jpg
Born
Nandita Arvind Morarjii

(1974-12-25) 25 December 1974 (age 44)
Other namesNagma Sadanah
OccupationActor, politician
Years active1990—present
(as a politician)
Political partyIndian National Congress
RelativesRoshini (half-sister)
Jyothika (half-sister)
Tharun Parsi (half-sister)

Nagma (born Nandita Arvind Morarji on 25 December 1974) is an Indian politician and former actress. She is better known for her roles in Telugu and Tamil movies like Gharana Mogudu, Kadhalan, Baashha and many others.[1] She began her acting career in Bollywood and acted in a few of the biggest Bollywood movies and in other languages. Nagma has acted in a broad range of India's languages: Hindi, Telugu, Tamil, Bhojpuri, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Punjabi, and Marathi.[2]

Early life[edit]

Nagma's biological father was Arvind Pratapsinh Morarji whose forefathers hailed from a royal Hindu Rajput background from Jaisalmer, later migrating to Porbandar, Gujarat and finally Mumbai. Her great-grandfather Gokuldas Morarji was a reputed businessman in the shipping, textile, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. Her mother is a Muslim and hailed from the Konkan region of Maharashtra. She belonged to the Kazi freedom fighter family and her original name was Shama Kazi, but she is now known as Seema. She married Morarji in 1969 at the CCI Club in Mumbai, but separated from him in 1974 According to Nagma's passport, the name given to her at birth was Nandita Arvind Morarji, which has now been updated to Nagma Arvind Morarji. In her father's obituary printed by the family, she is referred to by her original name, Nandita. After divorcing Morarji in August 1974, Nagma's mother married Chander Sadanah, a film producer in March 1975 with whom she had three children: including two daughters, actresses Roshini and Jyothika. Through her biological father, who had remarried earlier, Nagma has two half-brothers, Dhanraj, and Yuvraj.[citation needed]

Nagma remained close to her biological father until his death on 31 December 2005. She explained to a Mumbai reporter that "I am proud of the fact that I belong to a respectable family. My mother was legally married to my father, the late Shri Arvind Morarji, at a public function at the CCI Club, Mumbai." It was Nagma's mother who encouraged her to become an actress and is said to have been her "constant companion on the film sets" for several years.[3]

Inspired by her entrepreneurial background, Nagma forayed into the clothing business by opening a boutique in Mumbai in Bandra West on Hill Road called Nagma's, which was inaugurated in September 2000 by Akshay Kumar.[4] Although the boutique was highly successful and an instant hit, she had to shut it down in 2003 as she had to be by the side of her ailing father while simultaneously honoring her Bhojpuri and other language film commitments apart from her spiritual quest, then teaching Art of Living.[5]

Acting career[edit]

Nagma's debut film Baghi: A Rebel for Love, opposite Salman Khan was Hindi cinema's seventh highest-grossing film in 1990.[6] With Karisma Kapoor, she was also one of the female leads in 1994's Suhaag with Ajay Devgan and Akshay Kumar. Following these films, she moved south to star in Telugu and Tamil movies at the behest of her friend Divya Bharti. Explaining her shift, she cited what she was more conscious of the quality of work, in terms of meaty roles and her flair to travel throughout India understanding different cultures and her drive and passion to get acclamation from all over India. She stated "Language was never a barrier. I love adventure, culture and have great respect for the Indian tradition".

Her Telugu films include 1992's Gharana Mogudu with Chiranjeevi, Allari Alludu with Nagarjuna Akkineni and Major Chandrakanth with N. T. Rama Rao and Mohan Babu. Her Tamil films include Baasha with Rajnikanth and 1994's Kadhalan with Prabhu Deva.

After moving back to Mumbai, she told an interviewer in 2001, "The pressure of being the number one actress in Tamil cinema was getting to me. I was unhappy with the kind of films I was doing. I couldn't do the kind of work I wanted to because I had to go by the dictates of what the audience expected of a much-in-demand actress. I was stagnating so I decided to take a break."[7] Again based in Hindi cinema, she focused on supporting roles in films like 2000's Chal Mere Bhai, which reunited her with former co-stars Karisma Kapoor, Salman Khan and Sanjay Dutt. Within a year, Nagma enrolled in the spiritually oriented Art of Living course, eventually teaching it herself in Mumbai and elsewhere.[8] While based in Mumbai, she continued to work in some Telugu and Tamil movies, such as Allari Ramudu and Citizen, as well as taking leading roles in some Malayalam films.

Nagma has acted in Bhojpuri movies, including films with the Big Boss participant Ravi Kishan. She won a Best Actress award at the 2005 Bhojpuri Film Awards for her performance in Dulha Milal Dildar.[9] In 2006's Ganga, she starred in the title role opposite Amitabh Bachchan and Hema Malini. When asked why she shifted to Bhojpuri films, she said "I wanted to do films in different languages. I have already done movies in 10 languages. My first Bhojpuri film Panditji Bataayina Biyaah Kab Hoii was a huge hit. After that, the offers poured in and they were too good to be ignored."[10] When interviewed by The Hindu in Delhi in April 2007, she indicated that another important reason for her decision to focus on Bhojpuri films was to help with her political campaigning.[11]

In 2006, she made her Punjabi film debut, starring alongside Raj Babbar in Ek Jind Ek Jaan.

Discussing her career in a Mid-Day interview in September 2006, Nagma said "I have learned nine languages, so I want to do films in all languages. On the Hindi film front, I am in the process of signing a very big period thriller. I am getting to do a variety of roles with content, so I am satisfied."[12] While noting her commitment to complete several Bhojpuri films she was involved with, in March 2007, she expressed her intention to next focus on returning to Hindi films after wrapping up her projects.[13][unreliable source?] In her 2007 Hindustan Times interview, in which she discusses her future plans for cinema and politics, Nagma responded to a question about her reputation for controversy by saying "You need guts to deal with controversies. Of course, whether it’s for negative or positive reasons, I’ve always been in the news."[14]

Politics[edit]

A vocal supporter of India's Indian National Congress, she had only formally become a member of the Congress Party in Delhi, reportedly citing its "commitment towards secularism and welfare of the poor and weaker sections" as her reason for joining.[15] She was also fielded by the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), as a candidate from Hyderabad for the General Lok Sabha Elections according to an Indo-Asian News Service report [15][16] Nagma has elsewhere been cited as saying that she first supported the Congress Party because of her admiration for Rajiv Gandhi.[17]

In a 2006 interview, she made a direct link between her family history and her political activism: "My mom is Muslim and my dad is Hindu. We were brought up to respect all religions. Communal riots pained me. I wanted to do something. So I joined politics.". She had to turn down an offer to run for India's Lok Sabha in 2003 due to her many film commitments. "If I wanted to become a member of Parliament I would need to give 100 per cent to my constituency — which I could not at that point of time."[18] In an interview with the Hindustan Times in 2007, she said "politics will continue".[14]

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Role Language Notes
1990 Baaghi: A Rebel for Love Kaajal, a.k.a. "Paro" Hindi Debut film
1991 Peddinti Alludu Geeta Telugu
Killer Priya Telugu
1992 Gharana Mogudu Uma Devi Telugu
Bewaffa Se Waffa Nagma Hindi
Dilwale Kabhi Na Hare Anjali Oberoi Hindi
Police Aur Mujrim Meena Khanna Hindi
Yalgaar Anu Singhal Hindi
Aswamedham Sowjanya Telugu
1993 King Uncle Kavita Hindi
Major Chandrakanth Seetha Telugu
Varasudu Keerthi Telugu
Hasti Neena Narang Hindi
Kondapalli Raja Subbalakshmi Telugu
Dhartiputra Lisa Hindi
Allari Alludu Sravani Telugu
Rendilla Poojari Telugu
Green Snake Bharata Natyam dancer Cantonese & Mandarin Chinese
1994 Mugguru Monagallu Rani Telugu
Kadhalan Sruthi Tamil
Suhaag Madhu Hindi
Super Police Roja Telugu
Gang Master Sandhya Telugu
Aavesham Telugu
1995 Baashha Priya Tamil
Mounam Telugu
Ragasiya Police Raji Tamil
Villadhi Villain Janaki Tamil
Rikshavodu Rani Telugu
Adavi Dora Priya Telugu
Bharatha Simham Telugu
1996 Love Birds Mridula Tamil
Saradha Bullodu Nirmala Devi Telugu
Mettukudi Indhu Tamil
1997 Kaun Rokega Mujhe Hindi
Surya Putrulu Telugu
Janakiraman Indhu Tamil
Periya Thambi Selvi Tamil
Pistha Vanilla Tamil
Aravindhan Anu Tamil
1998 Sreekrishnapurathe Nakshathrathilakkam Yamuna Rani Malayalam
Kurubana Rani Rani Kannada
Vaettiya Madichu Kattu Tamil
1999 Lal Baadshah Hindi Special appearance
Ravimama Kannada
2000 Kunwara Sharmila Singh Hindi
Chal Mere Bhai Sonia Hindi
Papa The Great Mrs. Pooja Jai Prakash Hindi
2001 Dheena Tamil Special appearance
Sai Teri Maya Hindi
Ek Rishtaa: The Bond of Love Hindi Special appearance
Citizen CBI Sarojini Harichandran Tamil
Yeh Teraa Ghar Yeh Meraa Ghar Anupama Verma Hindi
2002 Chathurangam Nayana Pillai Malayalam
Allari Ramudu Chamundeswari Telugu
Ninu Choodaka Nenundalenu Telugu Special appearance
2003 Hrudayavantha Kannada
2004 Ab Tumhare Hawale Watan Saathiyo Aarti V. Singh Hindi
2005 Pandit Ji Batai na Vivah Kab Hoi Bhojpuri
Dulha Milal Dildar Bhojpuri Winner, Bhojpuri Film Award for Best Actress [19]
Panditji Batai Na Byah Kab Hoi Bhojpuri
Parinam Bengali
2006 Ek Jind Ek Jaan Nimmi Punjabi
Ganga Ganga Bhojpuri
Ab Ta Banja Sajnwa Hamaar Bhojpuri
Mai Baap Bhojpuri
Dil Diwana Tohar Ho Gayil Bhojpuri
Raja Thakur Bhojpuri
2007 Back To Honeymoon Hindi
Thamb Lakshmi Thamb Lakshmi Marathi
Tu Hamaar Hou Bhojpuri

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Hindu : Nagma plays mother". Hinduonnet.com.
  2. ^ "டோடோவின் ரஃப் நோட்டு". டோடோவின் ரஃப் நோட்டு.
  3. ^ "For Indophiles and Those Who Crave Bollywood". I Crave Bollywood. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  4. ^ ""Akshay inaugurates Nagma's boutique"".
  5. ^ "Ganguly?s career was at stake, so we parted: Nagma". Rediff.com.
  6. ^ [1] Archived 7 April 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Filmfare interview, May 2001 "Clean Bowled – Match-fixing... and much more with Nagma" at [2]
  8. ^ "Nagma practices the art of living!" ApunKaChoice.com (19 April 2003) at Cinema/20030419-0.html[unreliable source?]; and "Venky and Nagma's Art of Living!" at [3]
  9. ^ ""Results", Bhojpuri Film Awards website". bhojpurifilmaward.com. Archived from the original on 26 May 2007.
  10. ^ ZeeNews.com "Racism, controversies forced Nagma to quit Hindi Cinema" (15 March 2007) [4]; and IndiaInfo.com (IANS), "Racism, controversies forced Nagma to quit Hindi Cinema" (16 March 2007) [5]
  11. ^ ""Figure in focus..." Anuj Kumar, in The Hindu (5 April 2007)". Hindu.com.
  12. ^ ""Nagma's sister getting married" in Mid-Day (1 Sept. 2006), online at".
  13. ^ "Saavn – Hindi Songs Free Download, Old, Latest, New, mp3, Bollywood Music, Online". smashits.com. Archived from the original on 22 December 2008.
  14. ^ a b "You need guts to deal with controversies: Nagma," Hindustan Times (16 March 2007) [6]
  15. ^ a b ""Film actress Nagma joins Congress" Indo-Asian News Service (16 April 2004)". Yahoo.com. Archived from the original on 6 May 2006.
  16. ^ ""Nagma in poll fray?" Times News Network (21 March 2004)". timesofindia.com.
  17. ^ "See, e.g., "Government office for Nagma?" (10 Nov. 2006) at".
  18. ^ A Ganesh Nadar interview with Nagma, "Nagma, the survivor — The actress who has truly done it all." (10 March 2006), at rediff.com [7]
  19. ^ See, e.g., "First-ever Bhojpuri awards " in Mid-Day (1 Feb.2006), online at [8]

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