Naminatha

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Naminatha
21st Tirthankara
Naminatha
Naminatha statue at Mathura Museum
Venerated inJainism
PredecessorMunisuvrata
SuccessorNeminatha
SymbolBlue Water-Lily Or Blue Lotus[1]
Height15 bows (45 metres)[2]
ColorGolden
Personal information
BornMithila
DiedShikharji
Parents
  • Vijaya (father)
  • Vapra (Vipra) (mother)

Naminatha was the twenty-first tirthankara of the present half time cycle, Avsarpini. He was born to the King Vijaya and Queen Vipra of the Ikshvaku dynasty. King Vijaya was the ruler of Mithila at that time.[3] When Naminatha was in his mother's womb, Mihila was attacked by a group of powerful kings. The aura of Naminatha forced all the kings to surrender to King Vijaya.[4]

Biography[edit]

Naminatha was born on the 8th day of Shravan Krishna of the lunisolar Jain calendar. He attained Kevala Jnana under a Bakula tree. He had 17 Ganadhara, Suprabha being the leader.[5] According to Jain tradition, he liberated his soul by destroying all of his karma and attained Moksha from Sammed Shikhar nearly 50,000 years before Neminatha.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Tandon 2002, p. 45.
  2. ^ Sarasvati 1970, p. 444.
  3. ^ Tukol 1980, p. 31.
  4. ^ Jain 2009, p. 87-88.
  5. ^ Shah 1987, p. 163.
  6. ^ Zimmer 1952, p. 226.

Sources[edit]

  • Johnson, Helen M. (1931), Naminathacaritra (Book 7.11 of the Trishashti Shalaka Purusha Caritra), Baroda Oriental Institute
  • Shah, Umakant Premanand (1987), Jaina-Rupa Mandana: Jaina Iconography, 1, India: Shakti Malik Abhinav Publications, ISBN 81-7017-208-X
  • Tukol, T. K. (1980), Compendium of Jainism, Dharwad: University of Karnataka
  • Sarasvati, Swami Dayananda (1970), An English translation of the Satyarth Prakash, Swami Dayananda Sarasvati
  • Zimmer, Heinrich (1953) [April 1952], Joseph Campbell, ed., Philosophies Of India, London, E.C. 4: Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd, ISBN 978-81-208-0739-6, This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  • Tandon, Om Prakash (2002) [1968], Jaina Shrines in India (1 ed.), New Delhi: Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India, ISBN 81-230-1013-3

External links[edit]