Naming (parliamentary procedure)

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Naming is a procedure in some Westminster parliaments that provides for the speaker to temporarily remove a member of parliament who is breaking the rules of conduct of the legislature. Historically, "naming" refers to the speaker's invocation of the process by calling out the actual name of the member, breaking the convention of calling on members by the name of their constituency.

Processes to name a member are present in the lower houses of the British, Australian, and Canadian parliaments, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and the legislatures of some Australian states and Canadian provinces. The implementation of the procedure varies by parliament, but usually requires the speaker to name a member, and then await another member to move that the offending member be disciplined according to the appropriate rules of order.

Process[edit]

In the British House of Commons, the Speaker or one of his or her deputies can initiate the process by proposing a vote on the suspension of a member of the House if the speaker believes that the member has broken the rules of conduct of the House. Usually this is only done if the member has already been ordered to leave the House (which automatically leads to suspension for the remainder of that day) and refused to do so, or has committed a serious breach of conduct, and carries a suspension of up to five days and the loss of the member's salary during that period.

The procedure to name members is under Standing Order 44. Members can be suspended for the remainder of the day under Standing Order 43 (previously numbered as Standing Order 42). The Speaker or Deputy Speaker declares "I name", followed by the name of the member; and invites the Leader of the House or their deputy to move the motion that the member be removed, and then puts the question:

A division is not normally required since MPs will usually back the speaker's judgement. However, when John McDonnell was named by deputy speaker Alan Haselhurst on 15 January 2009 for the disturbing the mace, a division was called because George Galloway and other members declared themselves with the Noes. A vote on the suspension was not held as no MPs were willing to act as tellers for the Noes.[1]

In the Australian House of Representatives, the procedure to name members is under Standing Order 94. Under Standing Order 94a, the Speaker can order the immediate removal of a member for one hour, which is not open to a division. If a member is named under Standing Order 94b, the removal is dependent on a vote. If a member is named, the Speaker declares, "I name", followed by the Electoral Division of the member, and then the Leader of the House moves the question:

If the vote passes by a simple majority, then the member is required to leave the house for 24 hours.

In the House of Commons of Canada, the Speaker's authority to remove members is listed under Standing Order 11. If a member is named by the Speaker, they are required to leave the House immediately, and are not allowed to return for the remainder of the day's sitting. Alternatively, the Speaker may suggest to the House the removal of a member for a specific period of time, which requires a motion to receive a majority vote on the House floor.[2] Although the removal of members was increasingly common through the 20th century, usage of the procedure has since declined, having only been used four times since 2000. The order to remove a member generally requires an act of defiance against the Speaker, as the removal of a member is usually justified by the generic reasoning that the member is "disregarding the authority of the Chair."

The procedure has also been used once in the Massachusetts Senate. On October 27, 1981, Senate President William M. Bulger named Senator Alan Sisitsky after Sisitsky continuously disrupted the Senate proceedings. Sisitsky was then removed from the Senate Chamber by a court officer.[3] The matter was referred to the Senate Ethics Committee, which recommended that Sisitsky be suspended indefinitely until he issued a formal apology to the Senate.[4]

Lists of namings[edit]

House of Commons (United Kingdom)[edit]

Date Speaker Member Party Reason
3 February 1881 Sir Henry Brand John Dillon, Charles Stewart Parnell, James Lysaght Finegan, John Barry, Joseph Biggar, Garrett Byrne, William Corbet, John Daly, Mr. Dawson, Thomas Patrick Gill, Edmund Dwyer Gray, Timothy Michael Healy, Richard Lalor, Edmund Leamy, James Leahy, Justin McCarthy, James Carlile McCoan, Edward Marum, Robert Henry Metge, Isaac Nelson, Arthur O'Connor, Thomas Power O'Connor, Daniel O'Donoghue, James Patrick Mahon, William Henry O'Sullivan, John O'Connor Power, John Redmond, Thomas Sexton, Alexander Martin Sullivan, Timothy Daniel Sullivan, Bernard Charles Molloy, James Joseph O'Kelly, Frank Hugh O'Donnell, Richard Power, Richard O'Shaughnessy Home Rule A mass ejection of Irish MPs who caused uproar in the House after hearing Michael Davitt had been arrested. Dillon was named for repeatedly trying to ask an overruled point of order. Parnell, Finegan, O'Kelly and O'Donnell were named for proposing William Ewart Gladstone no longer be heard during the debate. The rest were named for refusing to attend the divisions to object the members. No second teller appeared for the division for Callan so the "aye" voice vote was held. All refused to leave after being named and were ejected by the Serjeant-at-Arms, except Molloy who had already left the House.[5]
24 February 1885 Arthur Peel William O'Brien Irish Parliamentary [6]
28 Jul 1887 Arthur Peel Timothy Michael Healy Irish Parliamentary [7]
19 July 1888 Arthur Peel Charles Conybeare Liberal For stating the Barrow Drainage Bills were a public scandal.[8][9]
4 May 1892 Arthur Peel Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham Liberal [10]
15 August 1895 William Gully Charles Kearns Deane Tanner Irish Parliamentary [11]
5 Mar 1901 James Lowther / William Gully Eugene Crean, Patrick McHugh, Patrick White, John Cullinan, Patrick Doogan, Anthony Donelan, William Abraham, James Gilhooly, William Lundon, Thomas McGovern, Jeremiah Jordan Irish Parliamentary Deputy Serjeant-at-Arms [12]
30 March 1908 Deputy Speaker John O'Connor Irish Parliamentary Named but no division held as he left the House.[13]
16 October 1908 Alfred Emmott / James Lowther Victor Grayson Ind. Labour Party For repeatedly trying to ask an overruled point of order.[14]
1 July 1918 James Lowther Noel Pemberton Billing Independent [15]
1 December 1925 James Hope William Murdoch Adamson Labour For repeatedly trying to ask an overruled point of order.[16]
22 April 1937 Sir Dennis Herbert / Edward FitzRoy Aneurin Bevan Labour For refusing to withdraw his comment to Sir Dennis Herbert that "your conduct has been abominable".[17]
18 July 1949 Francis Bowles / Douglas Clifton Brown Ellis Smith Labour For repeatedly trying to ask on what basis speakers had been selected during the debate.[18]
16 November 1981 George Thomas Ian Paisley, Peter Robinson, John McQuade DUP For repeatedly disrupting a statement by James Prior. The sitting was suspended for ten minutes, the members were named, and the sitting was again suspended while they were ejected by force.[19]
26 May 1982 George Thomas Andrew Faulds Labour For persistently trying to ask an overruled point of order.[20]
2 May 1984 Bernard Weatherill Tam Dalyell Labour For accusing Margaret Thatcher of lying.[21]
17 July 1984 Bernard Weatherill Dennis Skinner Labour For refusing to withdraw his comment that Margaret Thatcher would bribe judges.[22]
31 July 1984 Bernard Weatherill Martin Flannery Labour For refusing to withdraw his words "one of Margaret Thatcher's tame Tory judges".[23]
11 November 1985 Bernard Weatherill Brian Sedgemore Labour For refusing to withdraw his accusation of Geoffrey Howe "perverting the course of justice".[24]
12 November 1987 Bernard Weatherill Tam Dalyell Labour For refusing to withdraw his accusation that Margaret Thatcher had lied.[25]
25 January 1988 Bernard Weatherill Ken Livingstone Labour For refusing to withdraw his accusation of Patrick Mayhew being an "accomplice to murder".[26]
18 February 1988 Bernard Weatherill Harry Cohen Labour For persistently requesting Christopher Chope give way after being refused.[27]
15 March 1988 Harold Walker Alex Salmond SNP For interrupting Nigel Lawson's 1988 budget over income tax.[28]
13 April 1988 Bernard Weatherill Dave Nellist Labour For persistently trying to ask an overruled point of order.[29]
25 July 1988 Bernard Weatherill Tam Dalyell Labour For refusing to withdraw his accusation that Margaret Thatcher had lied.[30]
14 Mar 1989 Bernard Weatherill Jim Sillars SNP For persistently trying to ask an overruled point of order.[31]
24 July 1989 Bernard Weatherill Tam Dalyell Labour For refusing to withdraw his accusation that Margaret Thatcher had lied.[32]
23 July 1990 Bernard Weatherill Dick Douglas Labour For persistently trying to ask an overruled point of order.[33]
29 November 1993 Betty Boothroyd The Rev. Ian Paisley DUP For refusing to withdraw the word "falsehood" during a debate with the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Sir Patrick Mayhew. The Speaker had first tried to remove Paisley under Standing Order 42.[34]
8 December 2005 Michael Martin Dennis Skinner Labour For refusing to withdraw his remark that "The only thing growing [in the 1970s and a lot of the 1980s] were the lines of coke in front of boy George and the rest of them", aimed at George Osborne.[35][36]
20 April 2006 Sir Alan Haselhurst Dennis Skinner Labour For refusing to withdraw his remark that Theresa May was being let off with having stated Tony Blair had misled the House, because she is a Conservative.[36][37][38]
23 July 2007 Michael Martin George Galloway Respect For questioning the integrity of MPs investigating whether he took money from Iraq, and challenging the authority of the speaker when told to back down on his accusations.[39]
15 January 2009 Sir Alan Haselhurst John McDonnell Labour For manhandling the parliamentary mace.[40]
18 September 2012 John Bercow Paul Flynn Labour For refusing to withdraw his accusation that ministers had lied during a statement from Philip Hammond regarding the suspension by NATO of joint operations with Afghan security forces.[41]
10 July 2013 John Bercow Nigel Dodds DUP For refusing to withdraw his remarks that the Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers was "deliberately deceptive" over her powers concerning a Parades Commission decision.[42]

Canada[edit]

House of Commons[edit]

Date Speaker Member Party Reason
15 March 1913 Thomas Simpson Sproule Michael Clark Liberal Refusing to come to order and "flagrantly violating the rules of the House." The House did not suspend him.[43]
24 March 1942 James Allison Glen Liguori Lacombe Independent Liberal Refusing to sit down, and insulting George Stanley White.[44]
4 July 1944 James Allison Glen Liguori Lacombe Independent Liberal Repeatedly interrupting other members.[45]
31 July 1944 James Allison Glen Herbert Alexander Bruce National Government Accusing prime minister Mackenzie King of bribery, and refusing to withdraw it.[46]
25 May 1956 Louis-René Beaudoin Donald Fleming Progressive Conservative Refusing to come to order during a committee meeting.[47]
10 February 1961 Roland Michener Frank Howard Co-operative Commonwealth Federation Referring to the actions of John Diefenbaker and veterans affairs minister Gordon Churchill as "scurrilous and underhanded," and accusing them of having "sinister motives." Refused to withdraw the statement.[48]
16 March 1962 Roland Michener Alexis Caron Liberal Accusing a committee chair of partiality. Refused to withdraw the statement.[49]
5 October 1962 Marcel Lambert Bernard Dumont Social Credit Refusing to sit down.[50]
19 June 1964 Alan Macnaughton Alvin Hamilton Progressive Conservative Accusing Lester Pearson of lying, and refusing to withdraw.[51]
16 May 1978 James Jerome Roch La Salle Progressive Conservative Referring to finance minister Jean Chrétien as a "liar," and refusing to withdraw.[52]
21 March 1979 James Jerome Thomas Cossitt Progressive Conservative Accusing Pierre Trudeau of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[53]
23 February 1981 Lloyd Francis Otto Jelinek Progressive Conservative Repeatedly accusing Pierre Trudeau of lying and refusing to withdraw.[54]
3 December 1981 Jeanne Sauvé Thomas Cossitt Progressive Conservative Accusing public works minister Paul Cosgrove of lying, and refusing to withdraw.[55]
19 May 1982 Jeanne Sauvé John Crosbie Progressive Conservative Referring to justice minister Jean Chrétien as a "liar" and refusing to withdraw multiple accusations of deception.[56]
16 June 1982 Jeanne Sauvé Svend Robinson New Democratic Accusing justice minister Jean Chrétien of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[57]
24 March 1983 Roderick Blaker (acting) Lorne Greenaway Progressive Conservative Referring to agriculture minister Eugene Whelan as a "hypocrite" and refusing to withdraw.[58]
20 May 1983 Lloyd Francis (acting) Ed Broadbent New Democratic Accusing Pierre Trudeau of lying, and refusing to withdraw.[59]
19 October 1983 Jeanne Sauvé Svend Robinson New Democratic Accusing the Speaker of colluding with transport minister Lloyd Axworthy, and refusing to withdraw.[60]
31 October 1983 Lloyd Francis (acting) Ian Deans New Democratic Refusing to sit down.[61]
25 May 1984 Jacques Guilbault (acting) Lyle Kristiansen New Democratic Refusing to withdraw allegations that Pierre Trudeau, Jean-Jacques Blais, and Allan MacEachen had lied to the House.[62]
8 June 1984 Lloyd Francis Dan Heap New Democratic Accusing acting prime minister Jean-Luc Pépin of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[63]
17 December 1984 John Bosley Ed Broadbent New Democratic Accusing Brian Mulroney of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[64]
19 December 1984 John Bosley Jean-Claude Malépart Liberal Saying that Brian Mulroney "never tells the truth", and refusing to withdraw.[65]
22 May 1985 John Bosley Jean-Claude Malépart Liberal Challenging the Speaker to name him after refusing to sit down.[66]
19 June 1985 John Bosley Brian Tobin Liberal Accusing Brian Mulroney of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[67]
27 June 1985 John Bosley John Nunziata Liberal Displaying an offensive prop to the House while another member was speaking.[68] The item itself was not described in the parliamentary record.
11 October 1985 John Bosley John Rodriguez New Democratic Refusing to sit down.[69]
24 February 1986 John Bosley James Fulton New Democratic Accusing deputy prime minister Erik Nielsen of lying, and refusing to withdraw.[70]
23 April 1986 John Bosley John Rodriguez New Democratic Refusing to yield the floor.[71]
21 May 1986 John Bosley Warren Allmand Liberal Accusing junior minister Andrée Champagne of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[72]
28 May 1986 John Bosley Ed Broadbent New Democratic Accusing Brian Mulroney of lying, and refusing to withdraw.[73]
11 June 1986 John Bosley Sergio Marchi Liberal Refusing to come to order, and accusing Brian Mulroney of lying to the House.[74]
24 March 1993 John Allen Fraser Dave Barrett New Democratic Accusing junior minister Harvie Andre of lying to a House committee, and refusing to withdraw.[75]
30 September 1994 Gilbert Parent Gaston Leroux Bloc Québécois Accusing Jean Chrétien of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[76]
29 May 1995 Gilbert Parent Jake Hoeppner Reform Accusing government house leader Herb Gray of lying to him, and refusing to withdraw.[77]
2 November 1995 Gilbert Parent Gilles Duceppe Bloc Québécois Accusing deputy prime minister Sheila Copps of lying to the House, and refusing to withdraw.[78]
Michel Bellehumeur
24 April 1996 Gilbert Parent Randy White Reform Referring to Jean Chrétien's statement as a "bold faced lie," and refusing to withdraw.[79]
12 February 1997 Gilbert Parent Chuck Strahl Reform Accusing Jean Chrétien of covering up the inquiry into the Somalia Affair, and failing to withdraw.[80]
1 October 1997 Gilbert Parent Svend Robinson New Democratic Accusing fisheries minister David Anderson of treason, and refusing to withdraw.[81]
1 December 1998 Gilbert Parent Michel Gauthier Bloc Québécois Referring to Jean Chrétien as a hypocrite, and refusing to withdraw.[82]
15 February 2000 Gilbert Parent Jim Abbott Reform Accusing human resources minister Jane Stewart of lying, and refusing to withdraw.[83]
5 April 2000 Gilbert Parent Suzanne Tremblay Bloc Québécois Ordering Bonnie Brown to "stop lying," and failing to withdraw.[84]
6 December 2002 Peter Milliken Yvan Loubier Bloc Québécois Repeatedly calling agriculture minister Lyle Vanclief a "liar," refusing to withdraw.[85]
30 November 2017 Geoff Regan Blake Richards Conservative Refusing to come to order after being warned for shouting at finance minister Bill Morneau mid-speech.[86]

Senate[edit]

Date Speaker Member Party Reason
19 February 1998 Gildas Molgat Andrew Thompson Liberal Failed to comply with an order to present himself in the Senate in order to explain his extensive record of truancy.[87]
5 November 2013 Noël Kinsella Patrick Brazeau Independent Conservative Participation in the Canadian Senate expenses scandal.[88]
Mike Duffy Independent
Pamela Wallin Independent Conservative

Australia[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

This list contains all instances that a member has been named during Questions without notice in the Australian House of Representatives.

Date Speaker Member Party Reason
14 May 1964 John McLeay Tom Uren Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interrupting despite warnings and calling Attorney General Billy Snedden a liar.[89]
29 March 1966 John McLeay Jim Cairns Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interrupting to insist that South Vietnam was not a member of the United Nations.[90]
27 September 1966 Acting Speaker Allan Fraser Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interrupting to insist the United States was responsible for a bombing in South Vietnam.[91]
28 September 1966 Acting Speaker Len Reynolds Australian Labor Party For calling the lack of benefits for Australian Boer War and World War I veterans "a disgrace to servicemen who have served their country" and "a sell-out of the servicemen of World War I."[92]
14 October 1966 John McLeay Tom Jones Australian Labor Party For calling Prime Minister Harold Holt "a dirty low guttersnipe" and refusing to withdraw the remark.[93]
3 October 1967 William Aston Jim Cope Australian Labor Party For telling Philip Stokes to "shut up" and refusing to withdraw the remark.[94]
24 September 1970 William Aston Rex Patterson Australian Labor Party For saying Peter Nixon "made a lie" and refusing to withdraw the remark unreservedly.[95]
28 October 1970 William Aston Bill Hayden Australian Labor Party For repeatedly insisting that Billy Snedden was not answering his question.[96]
20 April 1971 William Aston Tom Uren Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interrupting and asking Prime Minister William McMahon "Is your name Popov the clown?" during a discussion of Australia's relations with the USSR.[97]
5 April 1973 Jim Cope Peter Nixon National Party of Australia For telling Prime Minister Gough Whitlam "you should be ashamed of yourself" over accusations of lying to the Yugoslav government and refusing to withdraw the remark.[98]
5 April 1973 Jim Cope John Gorton Liberal Party of Australia For telling Speaker Jim Cope "you ought to be ashamed of yourself" for naming Peter Nixon.[99]
5 April 1973 Jim Cope Jim Forbes Liberal Party of Australia For saying "that is disgraceful" regarding the naming of John Gorton.[99]
17 September 1974 Jim Cope Bill Wentworth Liberal Party of Australia For shouting over the speaker and refusing to apologize.[100]
25 February 1975 Jim Cope Doug Anthony National Party of Australia For repeatedly interjecting during a discussion of the cattle industry.[101]
5 June 1975 Gordon Scholes Bill Wentworth Liberal Party of Australia For asking Prime Minister Gough Whitlam "Would you like to wash your hands, Mr Prime Minister?" during a discussion of Australia admitting very few Vietnamese refugees.[102]
9 October 1975 Gordon Scholes Ian Sinclair National Party of Australia For arguing with the speaker over whether there was a point of order.[103]
18 November 1976 Billy Snedden Charles Jones Australian Labor Party For calling Phillip Lynch a dingo and arguing with the speaker.[104]
23 April 1980 Billy Snedden Brian Howe Australian Labor Party For calling Andrew Peacock a liar and arguing with the speaker.[105]
18 September 1980 Billy Snedden Paul Keating Australian Labor Party For saying Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser "could not lie straight in bed and his word cannot be believed or taken any notice of."[106]
27 August 1981 Billy Snedden Les Johnson Australian Labor Party For interrupting the speaker over a point of order which had been denied.[107]
6 May 1982 Billy Snedden Paul Keating Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interjecting that Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser had falsified information related to the budget, adding "you would name me to protect this stinking, corrupt Government."[108]
9 September 1982 Billy Snedden Michael Duffy Australian Labor Party For interjecting to criticize John Howard.[109]
12 October 1983 Harry Jenkins, Sr. Stephen Lusher National Party of Australia For interjecting to criticize John Dawkins.[110]
16 November 1983 Acting Speaker Ken Aldred Liberal Party of Australia For repeatedly interjecting to criticize Prime Minister Bob Hawke's support of a casino in Canberra and suggesting he was colluding with the developers.[111]
29 May 1984 Harry Jenkins, Sr. John Howard Liberal Party of Australia For interjecting to criticize John Dawkins.[112]
28 March 1985 Harry Jenkins, Sr. Ken Aldred Liberal Party of Australia For repeatedly interjecting during a question on Australia not participating in the Strategic Defense Initiative.[113]
18 April 1985 Harry Jenkins, Sr. Ian Cameron National Party of Australia "For again interjecting after having been warned by the Chair."
[114]
11 September 1985 Harry Jenkins, Sr. Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [115]
13 February 1986 Joan Child Ken Aldred Liberal Party of Australia [116]
28 May 1986 Joan Child Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [117]
21 August 1986 Joan Child Ian Sinclair National Party of Australia [118]
18 September 1986 Joan Child Neil Brown Liberal Party of Australia [119]
17 October 1986 Joan Child Paul Everingham Country Liberal Party [120]
22 October 1986 Joan Child Ken Aldred Liberal Party of Australia [121]
23 February 1987 Joan Child Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [122]
18 May 1988 Joan Child Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [123]
3 November 1988 Acting Speaker John Spender Liberal Party of Australia [124]
23 November 1988 Joan Child Neil Brown Liberal Party of Australia [125]
8 March 1989 Joan Child Ian Sinclair National Party of Australia [126]
24 May 1989 Acting Speaker Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [127]
6 September 1989 Leo McLeay Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [128]
18 October 1990 Acting Speaker Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [129]
15 November 1990 Leo McLeay Michael Cobb National Party of Australia [130]
19 February 1991 Leo McLeay Neil Brown Liberal Party of Australia [131]
20 February 1991 Leo McLeay Fred Chaney Liberal Party of Australia [132]
16 May 1991 Leo McLeay Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [133]
26 November 1991 Leo McLeay Russell Broadbent Liberal Party of Australia [134]
31 March 1992 Leo McLeay Ken Aldred Liberal Party of Australia [135]
2 April 1992 Leo McLeay Alexander Downer Liberal Party of Australia [136]
3 June 1992 Leo McLeay John Howard Liberal Party of Australia [137]
17 September 1992 Deputy Speaker Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia [138]
8 October 1992 Leo McLeay John Sharp National Party of Australia [139]
13 October 1992 Leo McLeay Fred Chaney Liberal Party of Australia [140]
10 November 1992 Leo McLeay Phillip Ruddock Liberal Party of Australia [141]
1 September 1993 Stephen Martin Alexander Downer Liberal Party of Australia [142]
7 October 1993 Stephen Martin Peter Reith Liberal Party of Australia [143]
27 October 1993 Stephen Martin Peter McGauran National Party of Australia [144]
25 November 1993 Stephen Martin Peter McGauran National Party of Australia [145]
2 June 1994 Stephen Martin Peter Slipper Liberal Party of Australia [146]
2 February 1995 Stephen Martin Peter Slipper Liberal Party of Australia [147]
6 February 1995 Stephen Martin Peter McGauran National Party of Australia [148]
22 June 1995 Stephen Martin Peter Slipper Liberal Party of Australia [149]
31 August 1995 Stephen Martin Lou Lieberman Liberal Party of Australia [150]
15 October 1996 Bob Halverson Stephen Martin Australian Labor Party [151]
31 October 1996 Bob Halverson Simon Crean Australian Labor Party [152]
5 February 1997 Bob Halverson Leo McLeay Australian Labor Party [153]
6 March 1997 Bob Halverson Martin Ferguson Australian Labor Party [154]
18 March 1997 Bob Halverson Gavan O'Connor Australian Labor Party [155]
18 November 1997 Bob Halverson Joel Fitzgibbon Australian Labor Party [156]
2 April 1998 Ian Sinclair Simon Crean Australian Labor Party [157]
2 April 1998 Ian Sinclair Martin Ferguson Australian Labor Party [157]
7 June 1999 Neil Andrew Warren Snowdon Australian Labor Party "Having reflected on the Chair." [158]
10 October 2000 Neil Andrew Arch Bevis Australian Labor Party "For continuing to interject after a general warning had been given by the Chair." [159]
29 November 2000 Neil Andrew Julia Irwin Australian Labor Party "For defying the Chair." [160]
7 February 2001 Neil Andrew Leo McLeay Australian Labor Party "For continuing to interject after a warning had been given from the Chair," and "having again interjected."[161]
1 March 2001 Deputy Speaker Cheryl Kernot Australian Labor Party "Having again interjected and reflected on the Chair." [162]
23 August 2001 Deputy Speaker Lindsay Tanner Australian Labor Party "For refusing to withdraw an unparliamentary expression when requested to do so." [163]
20 September 2001 Neil Andrew David Cox Australian Labor Party "For disorderly behaviour." [164]
21 March 2002 Neil Andrew Anthony Albanese Australian Labor Party "The Deputy Speaker reported that he had been required to adjourn the meeting of the Main Committee in accordance with the provisions of standing order 282 because of disorder arising in the Committee. He further reported that the Member for Grayndler (Mr Albanese) had persisted in disorderly behaviour by refusing to withdraw a remark after being called to order and thus defied the Chair of the Main Committee." [165]
28 May 2002 Neil Andrew Martin Ferguson Australian Labor Party "For continuing to interject after having been warned by the Chair." [166]
4 June 2002 Neil Andrew Warren Snowdon Australian Labor Party "For continuing to interject." [167]
10 December 2002 Neil Andrew Joel Fitzgibbon Australian Labor Party "continuing to interject" [168]
6 March 2003 Neil Andrew Mark Latham Australian Labor Party "For continuing to interject after having been warned by the Chair." [169]
6 March 2003 Neil Andrew Wayne Swan Australian Labor Party [169]
20 March 2003 Neil Andrew Craig Emerson Australian Labor Party "For defying the Chair." [170]
13 May 2003 Neil Andrew Wayne Swan Australian Labor Party [171]
9 March 2004 Neil Andrew Alan Griffin Australian Labor Party "For disorderly behaviour." [172]
24 March 2004 Neil Andrew Anthony Albanese Australian Labor Party "For disorderly behaviour in the process of withdrawing from the House." [173]
1 June 2004 Neil Andrew Harry Quick Australian Labor Party "For defying the Chair." [174]
11 August 2004 Neil Andrew Julia Irwin Australian Labor Party "For defying the Chair." [175]
9 August 2006 David Hawker Gavan O'Connor Australian Labor Party "For not withdrawing immediately and defying the Chair." [176]
14 February 2007 David Hawker Arch Bevis Australian Labor Party "For highly disorderly behaviour." [177]
19 September 2007 David Hawker Lindsay Tanner Australian Labor Party "For defying the Chair." [178]
20 September 2007 David Hawker Anthony Albanese Australian Labor Party "For defying the Chair." [179]
28 May 2008 Harry Jenkins Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia "For defying the Chair" after "continuing to interject after a warning had been given from the Chair." [180]
25 September 2008 Harry Jenkins Barry Haase Liberal Party of Australia "For defying the Chair." [181]
12 November 2008 Harry Jenkins Wilson Tuckey Liberal Party of Australia "For defying the Chair." [182]
26 May 2009 Harry Jenkins Christopher Pyne Liberal Party of Australia "For interjecting and disorderly behaviour." [183]
28 May 2009 Harry Jenkins Stuart Robert Liberal Party of Australia "For disorderly conduct when directed to leave." [184]
18 June 2009 Harry Jenkins Dennis Jensen Liberal Party of Australia [185]
19 August 2009 Harry Jenkins Barry Haase Liberal Party of Australia "For defying the chair."[186]
14 September 2009 Harry Jenkins Tony Abbott Liberal Party of Australia "For defying the chair."[187]
17 September 2009 Harry Jenkins Scott Morrison Liberal Party of Australia "For disorderly behavior."[188]
26 November 2009 Harry Jenkins Peter Lindsay Liberal Party of Australia "For continuing to interject after having been directed to leave the Chamber."[189]
25 February 2010 Harry Jenkins Andrew Laming Liberal Party of Australia "For continuing to interject after having been directed to leave the Chamber."[190]
18 March 2010 Harry Jenkins Paul Fletcher Liberal Party of Australia "For continuing to interject after having been directed to leave the Chamber."[191]
23 March 2011 Harry Jenkins Christopher Pyne Liberal Party of Australia For repeatedly interjecting after being warned.[192]
15 June 2011 Harry Jenkins Luke Hartsuyker National Party of Australia For repeatedly interjecting after being warned.[193]
22 March 2012 Peter Slipper Darren Chester National Party of Australia For being present in the public gallery after being removed from the house for one hour under Standing Order 94a.[194]
27 March 2014 Bronwyn Bishop Mark Dreyfus Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interjecting after being warned.[195]
23 June 2014 Bronwyn Bishop Wayne Swan Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interjecting.[196]
17 July 2014 Bronwyn Bishop Ed Husic Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interjecting.[197]
11 February 2015 Bronwyn Bishop Mark Dreyfus Australian Labor Party For repeatedly interjecting.[198]
26 February 2015 Bronwyn Bishop Jim Chalmers Australian Labor Party
25 March 2015 Bronwyn Bishop Andrew Laming Liberal Party of Australia Introducing flammable materials into the Federation Chamber
25 June 2015 Bronwyn Bishop Mark Dreyfus Australian Labor Party
17 March 2016 Tony Smith Wayne Swan Australian Labor Party Refusing to comply with an order to withdraw certain words used to accuse Christian Porter of lying.

Victorian Legislative Assembly[edit]

Date Speaker Member Party Reason
19 September 2013 Ken Smith Daniel Andrews Australian Labor Party Refusing to follow direction to leave the chamber[199]
11 June 2014 Christine Fyffe Geoff Shaw Liberal Party of Australia Misuse of entitlements[200]

House of Representatives (New Zealand)[edit]

Date Speaker Member Party Reason Ref
8 September 1994 Peter Tapsell Chris Carter Labour Calling John Banks a hypocrite over his pro-life stance on abortion.
26 August 1999 Doug Kidd Michael Cullen Labour
1 May 2003 Jonathan Hunt Richard Prebble ACT [201]
14 May 2003 Jonathan Hunt Nick Smith National [202]
24 June 2003 Jonathan Hunt Winston Peters NZ First [203]
26 June 2003 Jonathan Hunt Rodney Hide ACT [204]
8 September 2004 Jonathan Hunt Winston Peters NZ First [205]
17 October 2006 Margaret Wilson Nick Smith National [206]

Massachusetts Senate[edit]

Date President Member Party Reason
October 27, 1981 William M. Bulger Alan Sisitsky Democratic Continuous disruption of Senate proceedings. Was removed by a court officer and suspended until he issued a formal apology to the Senate.[3][4] He apologized on November 16, 1981, and was reinstated.[207]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "Transport Infrastructure". House of Commons Hansard. UK Parliament. 15 Jan 2009. Vol.486 Pt.14 c.367. Retrieved 2 February 2017. ; "MP suspended after mace protest". BBC. 15 January 2009. Retrieved 2 February 2017. ; Sparrow, Andrew (15 January 2009). "Labour MP suspended from Commons over Heathrow protest". The Guardian. London, UK. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  2. ^ House of Commons of Canada. "Chapter 1 Standing Orders - House of Commons". House of Commons of Canada. Parliament of Canada. Retrieved 2018-02-05. 
  3. ^ a b Kenney, Charles (October 27, 1981). "Bulger expels Sisitsky from state Senate". The Boston Globe. 
  4. ^ a b Collins, Laurence (November 3, 1981). "Sisitsky files suit to regain seat". The Boston Globe. 
  5. ^ "RULES OF DEBATE—DIVISIONS-SUSPENSION OF MEMBERS. (Hansard, 3 February 1881)". 
  6. ^ "THE NEW RULES OF PROCEDURE. (Hansard, 24 February 1885)". 
  7. ^ "PARLIAMENT—ORDER IN DEBATE— SUSPENSION OF MR. T. M. HEALY. (Hansard, 28 July 1887)". 
  8. ^ "ADJOURNMENT. (Hansard, 19 July 1888)". 
  9. ^ Conybeare withdrew his comment but it was not heard by the Speaker before he was named.
  10. ^ "SUSPENSION OF MR. CUNINGHAME GRAHAM. (Hansard, 4 May 1892)". 
  11. ^ "ADDRESS IN ANSWER TO HER MAJESTY'S MOST GRACIOUS SPEECH. (Hansard, 15 August 1895)". 
  12. ^ "CIVIL SERVICES AND REVENUE DEPARTMENTS ESTIMENTS, 1901–2 (VOTE ON ACCOUNT). (Hansard, 5 March 1901)". 
  13. ^ "GOVERNMENT OF IRELAND. (Hansard, 30 March 1908)". 
  14. ^ "LICENSING BILL. (Hansard, 16 October 1908)". 
  15. ^ "SUSPENSION OF MR. BILLING. (Hansard, 1 July 1918)". 
  16. ^ "SUSPENSION OF A MEMBER. (Hansard, 1 December 1925)". 
  17. ^ "CLAUSE 3.—(Financial assistance for new undertakings in Special Areas.) (Hansard, 22 April 1937)". 
  18. ^ "ECONOMIC SITUATION (Hansard, 18 July 1949)". 
  19. ^ "Northern Ireland (Security) (Hansard, 16 November 1981)". 
  20. ^ "Falkland Islands (Hansard, 26 May 1982)". 
  21. ^ "Argentina (Hansard, 2 May 1984)". 
  22. ^ "GCHQ (Hansard, 17 July 1984)". 
  23. ^ "Engagements (Hansard, 31 July 1984)". 
  24. ^ "Suspension of a Member (Hansard, 11 November 1985)". 
  25. ^ "Business of the House (Hansard, 12 November 1987)". 
  26. ^ "Royal Ulster Constabulary (Stalker-Sampson Investigations) (Hansard, 25 January 1988)". 
  27. ^ "Rate Limitation (Hansard, 18 February 1988)". 
  28. ^ "INCOME TAX (Hansard, 15 March 1988)". 
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