Nan Aron

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Nan Aron
Nan Aron Speaking.png
Nan Aron speaking at an Alliance for Justice event
Residence Washington, D.C.
Nationality American
Education Oberlin College
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Occupation Lawyer
Employer Alliance for Justice
Title President
Website www.allianceforjustice.org

Nan Aron is an American lawyer[1] and the founder and president of Alliance for Justice (AFJ), a liberal / progressive judicial advocacy group in the United States.[2][3] Staunchly liberal / progressive, Aron has been a noted opponent of conservative judicial nominees in the United States.[4][5] She repeatedly called for former President Barack Obama to be more aggressive in nominating liberals and progressives to the bench.[6]

Career[edit]

Aron received her B.A. from Oberlin College and her J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Prior to founding Alliance for Justice, Aron worked as a staff attorney for the ACLU's National Prison Project. Aron went on to serve as a trial attorney for the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she litigated race and sex discrimination cases against companies and unions in federal and district courts. In 1979, Aron founded the Alliance for Justice. She established its Judicial Selection Project in 1985.[4]

Nan has taught at Georgetown and George Washington University Law Schools, and serves on the Dean's Advisory Council at American University's Washington College of Law.[citation needed]

Aron authored Liberty and Justice for All: Public Interest Law in the 1980s and Beyond in 1989, as well as Justice in the Making—A Citizen's Guide in 1993 with Alliance for Justice.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yeager, Holly (June 22, 2005). "Liberal campaigner ready for next big trial". Financial Times. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 
  2. ^ Mauro, Tony (May 22, 2015). "Supreme Court 'Litmus Test' Emerges in White House Race". National Law Journal. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 
  3. ^ Bravin, Jess (May 18, 2015). "Supreme Court Rules Felons May Sell, Transfer 'Clean' Guns". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Davis, Marcia (November 9, 2005). "Her Idea of Justice: Absolutely Not Alito". Washington Post. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 
  5. ^ Kirkpatrick, David (November 14, 2005). "Liberal Coalition Is Making Plans to Take Fight Beyond Abortion". New York Times. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 
  6. ^ Shear, Michael (May 27, 2013). "Obama Plans 3 Nominations for Key Court". New York Times. Retrieved 26 May 2015. 

External links[edit]