Nanabhai Bhatt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Nanabhai Bhatt
Born(1915-06-12)12 June 1915
Porbandar,
Porbandar State
(Present day:
Porbandar,
Gujarat,
India)
Died24 April 1999(1999-04-24) (aged 83)
NationalityIndian
Other namesYeshwant Bhatt
Batuk Bhatt
OccupationFilm director, film producer
Years active1942-1988
Spouse(s)Hemlata Bhatt
Shirin Mohammad Ali
Children9, including Mahesh Bhatt
Mukesh Bhatt
Robin Bhatt
RelativesSee Bhatt family

Nanabhai Bhatt (12 June 1915– 24 April 1999) was a well-known Indian film director and producer of Bollywood and Gujarati cinema,[1][2] known for making over a hundred fantasy and mythological films,[3] including Mr. X (1957), Zimbo Comes to Town (1960), Lal Qila (1960) and the blockbuster Kangan (1959) starring Nirupa Roy and Ashok Kumar.[4][5] His first film, Muqabala (1942), was the first to feature the double-role or "twins" phenomenon in Indian cinema, wherein lead actress Fearless Nadia alternated between the good sister and the gangster's moll. The formula was subsequently emulated in numerous Hindi films.[6]

Early life and career[edit]

Bhatt, called Yeshwant Bhatt, was born on 12 June 1915 in Porbandar, British India.[citation needed] [7]He started his early career in films as a sound recordist with Prakash Pictures, working under his brother Balwant Bhatt, and then by writing "scripts and stories" using the name Batuk Bhatt.[8] He began his directorial venture when he joined Homi Wadia's team at Basant Pictures[9] by co-directing two films with Babubhai Mistri, Muqabala (1942) and Mauj (1943), under the same name.[10] He directed two more films as Batuk Bhatt, Homi Wadia's Hunterwali Ki Beti (1943) and Liberty Pictures Sudhar (1949).[11] Bhatt left Basant Pictures and started his own production company "Deepak Pictures" in 1946.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Bhatt was the patriarch of the Bhatt film family. He had five daughters and four sons, including noted film director and producer Mahesh Bhatt, Mukesh Bhatt, and Robin Bhatt.

Bhatt died at Nanavati hospital in Mumbai from heart failure on 24 April 1999.[12][13]

Filmography[edit]

Producer[edit]

Director[edit]

  • Jaya Parvati Vrat (Gujarati film) (1982)
  • Gajara Maru (Gujarati film) (1981)
  • Dharti Mata (1976)
  • Balak Aur Janwar (1975)
  • Jeevan Rekha (1974)
  • Jung Aur Aman (1968)
  • Baghdad Ki Raatein (1967)
  • Shankar Khan (1966)
  • Bekhabar (1965)
  • Aadhi Raat Ke Baad (1965)
  • Samson (1964)
  • Alapiranthavan (1963)
  • Bhootnath (1963)
  • Naag Rani (1963)
  • Rocket Girl (1962)
  • Baghdad Ki Raaten (1962)
  • Teen Ustad (1961)
  • Police Detective (1960)
  • Lal Quila (1960)
  • Zimbo Shaher Mein (1960)
  • Daaka (1959)
  • Baazigar (1959)
  • Kangan (1959)
  • Naya Sansar (1959)
  • Madam XYZ (1959)
  • Son of Sinbad (1958)
  • Chaalbaaz (1958)
  • Mr. X (1957)
  • Ustad (1957)
  • Kismet (1956)
  • Watan (1954)
  • Toote Khilone (1954)
  • Sinbad Jahazi (1952)
  • Apni Izzat (1952)
  • Baghdad (1952)
  • Lakshmi Narayan (1951)
  • Ram Janma (1951)
  • Daman (1951)
  • Lav Kush (1951)
  • Janmashtami (1950)
  • Veer Babruwahan (1950)
  • Hamara Ghar (1950)
  • Veer Ghatotkach (1949)
  • Shaukeen (1949)
  • Maa Baap Ki Laaj (1946)
  • Chalis Karod (1946)
  • Mauj (1943)
  • Muqabala (1942)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NEWS: Limping at 75". Screen. 4 May 2007.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ "'Dhollywood' at 75 finds few takers in urban Gujarat". Financial Express. 22 April 2007.
  3. ^ Nanbhat Bhatt chapak.com.
  4. ^ "1959: Year that was". Indian Express. 29 May 1998.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "Quicktakes: Bhatts bereaved". Indian Express. 24 April 1999.
  6. ^ "SPECIAL: Is Old Gold?". Screen. 26 March 2010.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ "Mahesh Bhatt tours riot-ravaged Ahmedabad - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  8. ^ Sanjit Narwekar (1994). "Bhatt, Nanabhai". Directory of Indian film-makers and films. Flicks Books. p. 49. Retrieved 24 January 2015.
  9. ^ a b Rachel Dwyer; Senior Lecturer in Indian Studies Rachel Dwyer (27 September 2006). Filming the Gods: Religion and Indian Cinema. Routledge. pp. 44–. ISBN 978-1-134-38070-1. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  10. ^ Ashish Rajadhyaksha; Paul Willemen (26 June 1999). Encyclopaedia of Indian cinema. British Film Institute. p. 63. Archived from the original on 7 June 2013. Retrieved 24 January 2015.
  11. ^ "Batuk Bhatt Filmography". Gomolo.com. Archived from the original on 28 January 2015. Retrieved 24 January 2015.
  12. ^ "Filmmaker Nanabhai Bhatt dead". Rediff. 23 April 1999. Archived from the original on 29 March 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2016.
  13. ^ PTI (24 April 1999). "Nanabhai Bhatt dead". The Tribune. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2016.

External links[edit]