Nancy Allbritton

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Nancy Allbritton
Nancy Allbritton.jpg
ResidenceChapel Hill, North Carolina
NationalityAmerican
Alma materJohns Hopkins University (1985); MIT (1987)
Known forSingle-cell analysis
Scientific career
FieldsBiomedical Engineering
InstitutionsThe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University

Nancy Allbritton is a Kenan Professor and Chair in the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University.[1]

She is best known for her work in single-cell analysis. Using engineering methods, Allbritton creates tools for better understanding and manipulating living cells and tissues. Microengineered platforms, microfluidics, and novel biochemical assays enable scientists to study cell signaling and signal transduction at the single-cell level.[2]

Education[edit]

Allbritton studied at Johns Hopkins University for a M.D in medicine and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a Ph.D in medical engineering in the 1980s.[2]

Research interests[edit]

Allbritton's interest in single-cell analysis have hinged on the use of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfabricated tehcnologies. Through this work she has studied lipid signaling at the single-cell level, the isolation cytotoxic t-cells with specific properties, and the capture of colonic crypts. In the organ-on-a-chip field, Allbritton has focused on developing devices that effectively capture the environment of both the small and large intestine.[citation needed]

Awards[edit]

Patents[edit]

  • "Fast controllable laser lysis of cells for analysis" Nancy L. Allbritton, Christopher E. Sims, Michael W. Berns, Gavin D. Meredith, Tatiana B. Krasieva, Bruce J. Tromberg U.S. Patent No. US6156576A
  • "Method and apparatus for detecting enzymatic activity using molecules that change electrophoretic mobility" Nancy L. Allbritton, Christopher E. Sims, Michael W. Berns, Gavin D. Meredith, Tatiana B. Krasieva, Bruce J. Tromberg U.S. Patent No. 6335201B1
  • "Method to measure the activation state of signaling pathways in cells" Nancy Allbritton, Christopher Sims U.S. Patent No. 7236888B2
  • "Chemical modifications to polymer surfaces and the application of polymer grafting to biomaterials" Nancy Allbritton, Christopher Sims, Guann-Pyng Li, Mark Bachman,Shuwen Hu, Xueqin Ren U.S. Patent No. 20050237480A1
  • "Systems and methods for efficient collection of single cells and colonies of cells and fast generation of stable transfectants" Nancy Allbritton, Christopher E. Sims, Yuli Wang, Mark Bachman, Guann-Pyng Li, Eric Stanbridge U.S. Patent No. 7759119B2
  • "Method and device for cell selection and collection in an isolated culturing environment" Nancy Allbritton, Christopher Sims, Wei Xu U.S. Patent No. 20110294208A1
  • "Array of micromolded structures for sorting adherent cells" Nancy Allbritton, Christopher Sims, Yuli Wang, Pavak Kirit Shah U.S. Patent No. 9068155B2

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Meet the Team | Single-Cell Isolation and Recovery". Cellmicrosystems.com. Retrieved 2017-05-01.
  2. ^ a b "Distinguished Seminar Series: Nancy Allbritton, Professor and Chair Department of Biomedical Engineering University of North Carolina & North Carolina State University". UCDavis Biomedical Engineering. October 30, 2014. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  3. ^ "Nancy Allbritton". Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Nancy Allbritton". UNC Lineberger. Retrieved April 12, 2017.

External links[edit]