Nancy Banks-Smith

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Nancy Banks-Smith (born 1929) is a British television and radio critic. Born in Manchester and raised in a pub,[1] she was educated at Roedean. She was a writer for The Sun in the 1960s, and left the newspaper in 1969 when it was bought by Rupert Murdoch who turned it into a sensationalist tabloid.[2] She also worked briefly for the Daily Express in the 1960s. Banks-Smith began writing for The Guardian in 1970, with her television column becoming a leading feature of the newspaper. She has remained with The Guardian for over 40 years, and as of 2016 writes a monthly column for the paper entitled "A month in Ambridge", reviewing recent developments in the radio soap opera The Archers.

Awards[edit]

In 1970 she was recommended for the Order of the British Empire, which she declined.[3]

Career[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nancy Banks-Smith (2 March 2016). "Nancy Banks-Smith: 'I grew up in a pub – I thought Corrie was a documentary'". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 March 2016. 
  2. ^ Celebrating 40 years of Nancy Banks-Smith, The Guardian, 4 February 2010
  3. ^ "Some who turned honours down", The Guardian, 22 December 2003, retrieved 31 August 2012.

External links[edit]