Nancy Barto

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Nancy Barto
Nancy Barto by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 15th district
Assumed office
January 14, 2019
Serving with John Allen
Preceded byHeather Carter
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 15th[1] district
In office
January 14, 2013 – January 14, 2019
Preceded byDavid Lujan
Succeeded byHeather Carter
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 7th district
In office
January 10, 2011 – January 14, 2013
Preceded byJim Waring
Succeeded byJack Jackson, Jr.
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 7th district
In office
January 2007 – January 10, 2011
Serving with Ray Barnes (2007–2011)
Preceded byDavid Smith
Personal details
BornChicago, Illinois
NationalityAmerican
Political partyRepublican
ResidencePhoenix, Arizona
Alma materArizona State University
Arizona State University at the West campus
Websitenancybarto.com

Nancy K. Barto[2] (born in Chicago, Illinois) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Arizona House of Representatives since January 14, 2019. She previously served in the Arizona Senate representing District 15 from 2013 to 2019. Barto served consecutively in the Arizona State Legislature from January 2007 until January 10, 2011 in the Arizona House of Representatives District 7 seat, then in the Arizona Senate in the District 7 seat from January 10, 2011 until January 14, 2013.

Education[edit]

Barto attended Arizona State University and Arizona State University at the West campus.

Positions[edit]

Barto sponsored a bill to prohibit cities and counties in Arizona from banning plastic bags.[3] SB1241, the "ban on banning bags", became law when the governor signed it on April 13, 2015.[4]

In 2019, Barto sponsored three bills (HB2470, HB2471, HB2472) relating to childhood vaccination. HB2470 would add a non-medical religious belief exemption for childhood vaccines, and removed a signature requirement for parents.[5] HB2471 would require doctors to inform parents about potential risks of vaccines and how to file for injury claims related to vaccines.[6] HB2472 would require doctors to offer a blood test prior to vaccination; the test would determine if a child already possesses the antibodies that would be developed from a vaccine.[7] Barto stated the bills were not intended to promulgate anti-vaccine policy, but rather were about expanding parental freedom and choice. Barto added "We need to look at the data, look at the science and recognize that there's research on both sides", despite warnings by public health officials that the bills would reduce immunization rates in Arizona.[8][9]

Elections[edit]

2006: State Representative – District No. 7[edit]

To challenge House District 7 incumbent Republican Representatives Ray Barnes and David Smith, Barto ran in the four-way September 12, 2006 Republican Primary; Barto placed first with 7,218 votes and Representative Barnes placed second;[10] in the five-way November 7, 2006 General election, Barto took the first seat with 29,952 votes and Representative Barnes took the second seat ahead of Democratic nominees Marilyn Fox, Jeanne Lunn, and Libertarian candidate Jim Iannuzo,[11] who had run for a House seat in 2004.

Summary of the 2006 Arizona Republican Primary Election for State House District 7[10]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 7,218 38.7%
 
Republican Ray Barnes 4,724 25.3%
 
Republican David Burnell Smith 4,392 23.5%
 
Republican Howard Sprague 2,331 12.5%
 
Total 18,665 100%

† Won nomination for general election

Summary of the 2006 Arizona General Election for State House District 7[11]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 29,952 29.7%
 
Republican Ray Barnes 27,897 27.7%
 
Democratic Marilyn Fox 21,143 21.0%
 
Democratic Jeanne Lunn 2,331 19.5%
 
Libertarian Jim Iannuzo 2,128 2.1%
 
Total 100,721 100%

2008: State Representative – District No. 7[edit]

Barto, Republican Representative Barnes, Democratic nominee Jeanne Lunn, and Libertarian candidate Jim Iannuzo were unopposed for their September 2, 2008 primaries,[12] setting up a rematch; in the four-way November 4, 2008 General election, Barto took the first seat with 46,854 votes and Representative Barnes took the second seat ahead of Democratic nominee Jeanne Lunn and Libertarian candidate Jim Iannuzo.[13]

Summary of the 2008 Arizona General Election for State House District 7[13]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 46,854 36.6%
 
Republican Ray Barnes 40,471 31.6%
 
Democratic Jeanne Lunn 31,753 24.8%
 
Libertarian Jim Iannuzo 8,966 7.0%
 
Total 128,044 100%

2010: State Senator – District No. 7[edit]

When Republican Senator Jim Waring ran for Phoenix City Council and left the Senate District 7 seat open, Barto and Representative Barnes both ran in the four-way August 24, 2010 Republican Primary, where Barto placed first with 10,475 votes (46.2%);[14] in the November 2, 2010 General election, winning with 41,849 votes (67.2%) against Democratic nominee Eric Shelley.[15]

Summary of the 2010 Arizona Republican Primary Election for State Senate District 7[14]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 10,475 46.2%
 
Republican Ray Barnes 7,461 32.8%
 
Republican Bob Green 3,254 14.3%
 
Republican Brad Buch 1,503 6.6%
 
Total 22,693 100%

† Won nomination for general election

Summary of the 2010 Arizona General Election for State Senate District 7[15]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 41,849 67.2%
 
Democratic Eric Shelley 20,441 32.8%
 
Total 62,290 100%

2012: State Senator – District No. 15[edit]

Redistricted to District 15, Barto was unopposed for the August 28, 2012 Republican Primary, winning with 19,162 votes,[16] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 58,283 votes (73.2%) against Libertarian nominee Dennis Grenier.[17]

Summary of the 2012 Arizona General Election for State Senate District 15[17]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 58,213 73.1%
 
Libertarian Dennis Grenier 21,384 26.9%
 
Total 79,597 100%

2014: State Senator – District No. 15[edit]

Barto defeated David Ryan in the primary,[18] then ran unopposed in the general election.[19]

Summary of the 2014 Arizona Republican Primary Election for State Senate District 15[18]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 13,585 62.9%
 
Republican David Ryan 8,012 37.1%
 
Total 21,597 100%

† Won nomination for general election

2016: State Senator – District No. 15[edit]

Barto ran unopposed in the primary,[20] then defeated the Democratic candidate, Tonya MacBeth, in the general election.[21]

Summary of the 2016 Arizona General Election for State Senate District 15[21]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 62,691 63.3%
 
Democratic Tonya K MacBeth 36,414 36.7%
 
Total 99,105 100%

2018: State Representative – District No. 15[edit]

Barto and John Allen ran unopposed in the primary,[22] then both defeated the Democratic candidates, Julie Gunnigle and Jennifer Samuels, in the general election.[23]

Summary of the 2018 Arizona General Election for State House District 15[23]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Nancy Barto 51,305 29.1%
 
Republican John Allen 49,279 27.9%
 
Democratic Jennifer Samuels 38,565 21.9%
 
Democratic Julie Gunnigle 37,308 21.1%
 
Total 176,457 100%

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nancy Barto". Phoenix, Arizona: Arizona State Legislature. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  2. ^ "Nancy Barto's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  3. ^ Rojas, Rick (April 2, 2015). "Arizona Bill Would Ban Local Limits on Plastic Bags". The New York Times. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  4. ^ "Prohibition on requirement of energy measuring and reporting; prohibition on regulation of auxiliary containers; state preemption; legislative findings; definition". Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 9, Chapter 4, Article 8, Section No. 9-500.34 of April 14, 2015. Arizona State Legislature.
  5. ^ "Relating to immunization exemptions". Arizona Revised Statutes, Section 15-873, Amendment of February 4, 2019. Arizona State Legislature.
  6. ^ "Relating to immunizations". Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 32, Chapter 32, Article 1 (Sections 36-672 and 36-673), Section No. 32-3226 of February 4, 2019. Arizona State Legislature.
  7. ^ "Relating to immunizations". Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 32, Chapter 32, Article 1, Section No. 32-3226 of February 4, 2019. Arizona State Legislature.
  8. ^ Innes, Stephanie (February 22, 2019). "Disregarding health warnings, Arizona lawmakers move forward on vaccine exemptions for kids". Arizona Republic. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  9. ^ Fischer, Howard (February 22, 2019). "Measures approved by Arizona lawmakers could result in fewer children being vaccinated". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  10. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 Primary Election - September 12, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 26, 2006. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  11. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 General Election - November 7, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 6, 2006. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  12. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 Primary Election - September 2, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 24, 2009. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  13. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 General Election - November 4, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 19, 2008. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  14. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 Primary Election - August 24, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  15. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 General Election - November 2, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 3 & 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  16. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 Primary Election August 28, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 6. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  17. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 General Election November 6, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 24, 2012. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  18. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2014 Primary Election August 26, 2014" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 28, 2014. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  19. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2014 General Election November 4, 2014" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 2, 2014. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  20. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2016 Primary Election August 30, 2016" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 20, 2016. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  21. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2016 General Election November 8, 2016" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 20, 2016. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  22. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2018 Primary Election August 28, 2018" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 25, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  23. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2018 General Election November 8, 2018" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 7, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2018.

External links[edit]