Nancy J. Paul

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Nancy J. Paul is an officer in the United States Air Force.[1]

Education[edit]

education.[1]
date institution
Associate of Science, Cypress College, Cypress, California
Bachelor of Science, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska
Juris Doctor, Creighton University School of Law, Omaha, Nebraska
1994 Squadron Officer School, Residence Program
1999 Air Command and Staff College, Seminar Program
2004 Air War College, Seminar Program

Military career[edit]

Paul received a direct commission into the United States Air Force as a Judge Advocate General in 1988.[1]

Lieutenant Colonel Paul is notable for her appointment as a Presiding Officer for a Guantanamo military commission.[1] Paul is the most junior officer appointed to serve as a Presiding Officer. All the other Presiding Officers are full Colonels or Captains in the United States Navy.

Presided over Ibrahim Ahmed Mahmoud Al Qosi's Commission[edit]

The Guantanamo military commission audio system, which has the ability to cut the sound to reporters when witnesses are testifying about classified topics, failed to let reporters hear Padgett's introduction to the court on July 15, 2009.[2]

Paul was appointed the Presiding Officer of Ibrahim Ahmed Mahmoud Al Qosi's military commission in early 2008.[3][4] On May 22, 2008, after hearing that Al Qosi didn't trust his assigned military lawyer, and had refused to meet with her, and had not been allowed to communicate with his family she ordered that a phone call be arranged, so they could secure civilian lawyers to aid in his defense. This order stirred controversy when Pauline Storum, a Guantanamo spokesman falsely claimed the next day that the call had already been completed.[5][6]

At his July 2009 hearing the court's new audio equipment malfunctioned.[2]

The Obama Presidency requested a series of continuances, so it could study alternatives to the military commission system.[7] Paul granted a final continuance on October 21, 2009.

On December 3, 2009, Paul convened the first hearing of a military commission following the October 2009 passage of the Military Commissions Act of 2009.[8][9] She ruled that the charges against Al Qosi should be limited to crimes he was alleged to have committed in Afghanistan. She ruled that crimes he was alleged to have committed when al Qaeda was based in Sudan were beyond the mandate of the military commission system.

Carol Rosenberg, writing in the Miami Herald, reported that Paul scheduled hearings for January 6, 2010, to determine whether Al Qosi met the eligibility criteria laid out in the Military Commissions Act of 2006.[10][11] Rosenberg described Paul as the first Presiding Officer of a Military Commission to address changes the US Congress set in place in the Military Commissions Act of 2009.

Andrea Prasow, a senior counsel with Human Rights Watch, was critical of Paul for proceeding with the Commission, even though the rules of procedure hadn't been drafted.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Biographical Summary: Nancy J. Paul, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF" (PDF). United States Air Force. p. page 7. Retrieved 2008-05-30.  mirror
  2. ^ a b Carol Rosenberg (2009-07-15). "Pentagon Presses Ahead With War Court". The Ledger. p. A10. Archived from the original on 2009-07-28. Retrieved 2009-07-28. The Sudanese captive's military lawyers struck a contrarian's note by arguing for a speedy trial in the case, invoking a "justice-delayed, justice-denied" argument on the grounds Qosi was among the first men taken to the prison camps when they opened in January 2002. President Barack Obama has ordered the prison camps emptied by Jan. 22. 
  3. ^ Carol Rosenberg (May 22, 2008). "Terror suspect phones Sudan to hire own lawyer". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on May 25, 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-25. Within hours of a judge's order, an accused al Qaeda conspirator from Sudan got a call from home Thursday to consult with his family on how they might hire him a lawyer, at their own expense.  mirror
  4. ^ "Guantanamo judge orders military to allow detainee phone call home to Sudan". International Herald Tribune. May 22, 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-25. 
  5. ^ Carol Rosenberg (May 24, 2008). "Guantánamo: Detainee didn't get call from home". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on May 25, 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-25. A military spokesman erred last week by telling journalists that an alleged al Qaeda conspirator at Guantánamo received a Red Cross-assisted telephone call from home.  mirror
  6. ^ Jane Sutton (May 24, 2008). "Guantanamo phone report was in error, U.S. says". Reuters. Retrieved 2008-05-25.  mirror
  7. ^ "Delays granted in 2 Guantanamo war crimes cases". Associated Press. 2009-10-21. Archived from the original on 2009-10-22. 
  8. ^ "Judge limits case against alleged bin Laden bodyguard to Afghanistan crimes". Dallas Morning News. 2009-12-04. Archived from the original on 2009-12-04. 
  9. ^ Nancy Paul (2009-12-03). "United States of America v. Ihrahm Ahmed Mohmoud al Qosi -- Ruling: P-010 Government motion to amend charges" (PDF). Office of Military Commissions. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-12-04. 
  10. ^ Carol Rosenberg (2009-12-03). "Guantánamo judge won't expand Sudanese captive's war crimes case". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2009-12-04. 
  11. ^ Nancy Paul (2009-12-03). "United States of America v. Ihrahm Ahmed Mohmoud al Qosi -- Ruling: D-023 Defense motion for article 5 status determination, or, alternately, dismissal for lack of personal Jurisdiction" (PDF). Office of Military Commissions. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-12-04. 
  12. ^ Andrea Prasow (2009-12-08). "Falling Short: Justice in the New Military Commissions". The Jurist. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09.