Nancy Snyder

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Nancy Snyder
Born December 2, 1949 (1949-12-02) (age 67)
Kankakee, Illinois, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Spouse(s) Stephen Schnetzer (m. 1982; 2 children)[1]

Nancy Snyder (born December 2, 1949) is an American actress who won the Clarence Derwent Award in 1976 and the Outer Critics Circle Best Actress award in the 1977–78 season.

Life and career[edit]

Snyder was born in Kankakee, Illinois, the daughter of Idelle (Bonham) and John Marshall Snyder, Sr., a director of research.[2][3] She opened in Jules Feiffer's comedy, Knock Knock,[4] and went on to win the Clarence Derwent Award for the "most promising female [actor] on the metropolitan scene" for the 1975–76 season.[5] She won Best Actress in the 1977–78 season in the annual awards given by the Outer Critics Circle for her role in July 5.[6][7] From 1978–1983, she was a regular on the ABC soap opera, One Life to Live, playing a hooker with a heart of gold, Katrina Karr. She appeared in the Lanford Wilson play, Angels Fall,[8] in 1982, which was nominated for a Tony Award, and in Wilson's Book of Days at the Signature Theater in 2002.

During her run on One Life to Live, she met co-star Stephen Schnetzer, who played Marcello Salta on the show. The two have been married since 1982. They have two children, Max and Ben Schnetzer, an actor.

Work[edit]

Stage[edit]

Film[edit]

Television[edit]

  • One Life to Live (TV series) Role: Katrina Karr
  • For Richer, For Poorer (TV series) Role: Colleen Griffin
  • Father's Choice (TV movie) Role: Assistant Director
  • Black Top (2001) (TV movie) Role: Office Assistant
  • Law & Order (2003) (TV series) Role: CeCe Vandeveer[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.filmreference.com/film/38/Stephen-Schnetzer.html
  2. ^ http://www.lincolntrailpublishing.com/obits/1962/john-snyder
  3. ^ http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=118819931
  4. ^ a b Gussow, Mel (January 19, 1976). "Stage: 'Knock Knock,' Feiffer's There". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  5. ^ a b c Calta, Louis (May 28, 1976). "Evans, Miss Snyder Win Derwent Awards". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b "Outer Critics Circle Honors 'Da'". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. May 22, 1978. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Outer Critics Circle: Awards for 1977-1978". Outer Critics Circle. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  8. ^ a b Rich, Frank (October 18, 1982). "'Angels Fall,' Landford Wilson's Apocalypse". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  9. ^ Kalem, T. E. (February 2, 1976). "Knock Knock by Jules Feiffer". TIME. Time Inc. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  10. ^ Eder, Richard (July 1, 1976). "Stage: Historical Farce". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  11. ^ Kalem, T. E. (October 25, 1976). "The Farm by David Storey". TIME. Time Inc. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  12. ^ Gusson, Mel (October 12, 1976). "David Storey's 'The Farm Is Family Play About Forces That Hold People Together". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  13. ^ Kerr, Walter (October 24, 1976). "Two Many Questions, Too Few Answers". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 
  14. ^ Gussow, Mel (November 10, 1978). "Theater: A Nightcap Without a Kick; Eyes on the Sky". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  15. ^ Brantley, Ben (November 4, 2002). "THEATER REVIEW; Small Town's Big Cheese Dies, So a Saint Goes Riding In". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  16. ^ Isherwood, Charles (November 4, 2002). "Book of Days". Daily Variety. Reed Business Information, Inc. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  17. ^ Thomas, Kevin (June 12, 1986). "Movie Review 'Kirlian Witness' rooted in langour". Los Angeles Times. p. 3. Retrieved January 22, 2009. 
  18. ^ "Law & Order: Season 13 > Bitch". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved January 21, 2009. 

External links[edit]