Nandagiri

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Nandagiri
town
Nandagiri is located in Telangana
Nandagiri
Nandagiri
Location in Telangana, India
Coordinates: 18°38′N 79°02′E / 18.633°N 79.033°E / 18.633; 79.033Coordinates: 18°38′N 79°02′E / 18.633°N 79.033°E / 18.633; 79.033
Country India
State Telangana
Languages
 • Official Telugu
Time zone IST (UTC+5:30)

Nandagiri ("hill of pleasure" ) is the name of several places in India. It is a village in Telangana, a suburb of Hyderabad.

Village[edit]

The village Nandagiri is in Pegadapalle mandal in Karimnagar district of Telanagna state. It has three temples nearby. The distance between karimnagar and nandagiri nearly 35 km. 6 km from pegadapalle. The village place for greenery and so many hills around the village. Agriculture is the major occupation in this village and KAKATHIYA canal is the main irrigation source to the agriculture which is started from the SRSP. Total population of village around 3000 (2011 census). In 2014 elections 1700 voters are used their vote. This village comes under DHARMAPURI(MLA)&PEDDAPALLI(MP) consistencies. SUNKARI MAMATHA-RAVI is the present surpunch of nandagiri village. Nandagiri VEERABRASWAMY temple is the famous temple in this village. Every year (vaikunta ekadasi) they conducted celebrations in this temple. TSRTC provided 5 buses to connect this village (LINGAPUR, CHILVAKODUR, PEGADAPALLY,DEEKONDA, KOTLA). In this village all political parties like TRS, Congress, BJP have individual cader. Grampanchayath office located in middle of the village. Each and every community have individual group in this village. It includes granite mines but no benefit for village revenue.

History[edit]

There are various testimonials to state the historical and religious importance of this place. It is said that King Satakarni (241 BC), the son of King Sreemukha of Satavahana dynasty, while going on Jaithra Yathra (victory lap) from Paithan (Prathistanapuram, present Aurangabad in Maharashtra state), made a halt at Nandagiri village and very much enjoyed the natural beauty of the place and constructed a Gagana Mandiram (Sky palace) on the top of the hillock. Its ruins are visible even now. Later on, it is said that the 17th king in the Satavahana Dynasty, King Hala (who wrote “Gatha Saptha Shathi” in Pyshachika language) and his wife resided at Nandagiri. Even though the Satavahana kings practiced Jainism and Buddhism, they also patronized Vedic religions. They constructed temples as per the Advaitha culture on the advice of vedic scholars.

Hyderabad[edit]

Nandagiri hills (Jubilee Hills) is a suburb of the city of Hyderabad, Telangana. Recently there has been controversy over the auctioning of plots in the hills by the Hyderabad Urban Development Authority, which apparently ignored the needs of the homeless.[1][2]

Hill Fort near Bangalore[edit]

Nandagiri in Karnataka is the famous Nandidroog, which was captured by Lord Cornwallis on his march to Seringapatam. From early times the Ganga Princes possessed the title of "Nandigiri Lords." The origin of this place may be found in the tradition that Vishnu Vardhana of the Eastern Chalukyas dynasty settled at Dharmapuri on the western bank of the Godavari river. Four hundred villages or towns became subject to him. His son was Nandu, who built a town called Nandagiri, in which the four castes of Hindus were located.[3]

Nandagiri was changed into Nandi-Giri by the Cholas in the 11th century, and it means the hill of Nandi - the name of the sacred bull of Siva.[4]

Nandagiri was ruled by a Bijialudu in the sixth century CE. He constructed the Saraswathi temple at Basar. In the 17th century, the idols of the temple were reinstated by a chieftain of Nandagiri (Nandeed) subsequent to destruction caused by the Muslim invaders.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Hindu: Left stalls HUDA auctions for two hours
  2. ^ http://www.hindu.com/2004/04/29/stories/2004042911780300.htm HUDA plans fresh auction for Nandagiri plots
  3. ^ Mysore and Coorg: A Gazetteer Compiled for the Government of India By Benjamin Lewis Rice Published by Mysore Government Press, 1876
  4. ^ A History of Vijayanagar: The Never to be Forgotten Empire by Bangalore Suryanarain Row, 1905
  5. ^ bharatonline.com: Saraswati Temple