Nanningosaurus

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Nanningosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: Ornithischia
Suborder: Ornithopoda
Family: Hadrosauridae
Genus: Nanningosaurus
Mo et al., 2007
Type species
Nanningosaurus dashiensis
Mo et al., 2007

Nanningosaurus is a genus of hadrosaurid dinosaur from the upper Late Cretaceous of the Nalong Basin, Guangxi, China.

The type and only species is Nanningosaurus dashiensis, named and described by Mo Jinyou, Zhao Zhongru, Wamg Wei and Xu Xing in 2007. The generic name refers to the city of Nanning, located close to the excavation site. The specific name is derived from the Pinyin da-shi, "great stone", the name of the village where the discovery was made.[1]

Nanningosaurus is based on holotype NHMG8142, an incomplete skeleton including skull, arm, leg and pelvis remains found in 1991, together with the holotype of Qingxiusaurus. The discoveries were in 1998 reported in the scientific literature.[2] The paratype is NHJM8143, a right maxilla.[1]

In 2010, Gregory S. Paul estimated the body length of Nanningosaurus at 7.5 metres, its weight at 2.5 tonnes.[3] No autapomorphies were given but a unique combination of diagnostic characteristics includes a high and sharp ascending branch of the maxilla, a short rear branch of the maxilla, relatively few tooth positions (twenty-seven in the maxilla), a transversely wide lower quadrate with a weak paraquadratic notch, a gracile upper arm, and an ischium that at the lower end of its rear edge curves towards its expanded tip.[1]

Mo et al. (2007), who described the specimen, performed a phylogenetic analysis that suggests Nanningosaurus was a basal lambeosaurine, although they stressed the support for this was tentative. This animal was the first hadrosaurid named from southern China.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Mo J.; Zhao Z.; Wang W.; Xu X. (2007). "The first hadrosaurid dinosaur from southern China". Acta Geologica Sinica (English Edition). 81 (4): 550–554. doi:10.1111/j.1755-6724.2007.tb00978.x.
  2. ^ Mo Jinyou, Wang Wei and Huang Yunzhong, 1998, "[Dinosaur fauna from the Nalong Basin, Guangxi and new comments on related stratigraphy]" Journal of Guilin Institute of Technology, 18 (Suppl.): 140-142
  3. ^ Paul, G.S., 2010, The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs, Princeton University Press p. 306