Nanosecond

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Common measurements[edit]

  • 0.5 nanoseconds (0.5 ns) – the average life of a molecule of positronium hydride
  • 1.0 nanosecond – cycle time for radio frequency 1 GHz (1×109 hertz), an inverse unit. This corresponds to a radio wavelength of 1 light-nanosecond or 0.3 m, as can be calculated by multiplying 1 ns by the speed of light (approximately 3×108 m/s) to determine the distance traveled.
  • 1.0 nanosecond – cycle time for a 1 GHz processor. As of 2011, common processors have frequencies around 1–3.5 GHz, so the cycle time is somewhat shorter than a nanosecond.
  • 1.017 nanoseconds (approximately) – time taken for light to travel 1 foot in a vacuum
  • 3.33564095 nanoseconds (approximately) – time taken for light to travel 1 metre in a vacuum[1] (In air or water light travels more slowly; see index of refraction)
  • 10 nanoseconds – one "shake", (as in a "shake of a lamb's tail") approximate time of one generation of a nuclear chain reaction with fast neutrons
  • 10 nanoseconds – cycle time for frequency 100 MHz (1×108 hertz), radio wavelength 3 m (VHF, FM band)
  • 12 nanoseconds – half-life of a K meson
  • 20–40 nanoseconds – time of fusion reaction in a hydrogen bomb
  • 77 nanoseconds – a sixth (a 60th of a 60th of a 60th of a 60th of a second)
  • 100 nanoseconds – cycle time for frequency 10 MHz, radio wavelength 30 m (shortwave)
  • 333 nanoseconds – cycle time of highest medium wave radio frequency, 3 MHz
  • 500 nanoseconds – T1 time of Josephson phase qubit (see also Qubit) as of May 2005
  • 1000 nanoseconds - one microsecond

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official BIPM definition of the metre". BIPM. Retrieved 2008-09-22.