Naohisa Takato

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Naohisa Takato
Born (1993-05-30) 30 May 1993 (age 26)
Shimotsuke, Japan
Native name高藤直寿
NationalityJapanese
Height160 cm (5 ft 3 in)
Weight60 kg (132 lb; 9 st 6 lb)
DivisionExtra-lightweight
StyleJudo
Fighting out ofTokyo, Japan
TeamAll Japan National Team
Park 24
TrainerMinoru Konegawa
Rank4th degree black belt in Judo
UniversityTokai University

Naohisa Takato (高藤直寿, Takatō Naohisa, born 30 May 1993) is a Japanese judoka.[1]

Takato is currently the top ranked judoka in the world in the extra-lightweight division.[2] He became one of judo's most prominent fighters by winning the 2013 World Championships.[3] In the same year, he also won the Masters in Tyumen,[4] and the prestigious Grand Slams in Paris,[5] Tokyo[6] and Moscow.[7] With these successes, Takato was ranked No. 1 in the world in 2013 and 2014.[8][9][10] He had an all-win record in 2013.[11] Specializing in drop kata guruma, his physical and technical fighting style has become iconic in judo.[12][13]

Outside the mat, Takato was one of the most searched judokas in 2015,[14] and the top earning male judoka on the IJF circuit since 2012.[15]

Takato has been chosen as Japan's extra-lightweight representative at the 2016 Olympics.[16][17]

Early life[edit]

Takato began judo at the age of 7. He joined Nogi-machi judo club as an elementary school student, which was also attended by future teammate Masashi Ebinuma. He had won in various weight divisions throughout elementary and middle school.[citation needed]

An alma mater of Sagami junior high and high school,[18] he won several national titles representing the school as well as the world cadet championships. He started attending Tokai University in 2012, and had graduated in 2016.[19]

Career[edit]

2016 Grand Slam Tokyo[edit]

Takato returned to the Grand Slam in Tokyo for his first outing after the Olympics. He faced Yanislav Gerchev of Bulgaria in his first fight, and showed his form with sode tsurikomi goshi, successfully scoring yuko and waza-ari with the skill.[20] He then faced Korea's Choi In Hyuk in a deadlocked fight. Despite being scoreless, Choi was penalised twice for passivity, driving Takato through to the semi-final. The bout was another tight fight as scores were nil, neither being able to successfully throw. After nearly ten minutes of play, Takato finally had a breakthrough with kosoto gari for yuko for a place in the final.[21]

It was an all-Japan bout in the final, with Ryuju Nagayama as his opponent. Both are trained by Minoru Konegawa, and had a 48 place difference in world rankings, with Takato ranked seventh and Nagayama 56th at the time. Takato attempted throughout the bout to bring the fight to newaza, however was unable to break Nagayama's defense. He most notably used sankaku jime. With one minute left, Takato attempted ashi guruma, but was unsuccessful and was left with a disadvantageous position as Nagayama was standing up. Nagayama then used uchi mata to throw Takato for ippon. The upset left Takato smiling as he congratulated Nagayama, settling for a silver medal.[22][23]

2017 Grand Slam Paris[edit]

Takato opened his international competition in 2017 with the Grand Slam in Paris. This would be the first event that would utilise revised rules of judo.[24][25][26][27] He faced local Vincent Manquest in his first fight and scored waza-ari with seoi nage. He then earned ippon with kesa-gatame after bringing the fight to the ground, going through to round 3. Takato fired an early waza-ari with kouchi gari, and scored a second using ouchi gari. He then transitioned to newaza, pinning his opponent again with kesa gatame, showing a versatility masterclass.[28]

In the quarter-final he faced Georgia's Amiran Papinashvili. The bout only lasted 40 seconds, as Takato threw him for ippon with kouchi gari. He then went against Azerbaijan's Orkhan Safarov, who was the only fighter in the tournament to throw Takato for a score with kosoto gari. However, with Takato scoring two waza-aris, both using kouchi gari, and then eventually scoring ippon, he was through to the final. Takato won his final fight by waza-ari, again with kouchi gari, and another newaza ippon with ushiro yoko shiho gatame. This would be Takato's third win at Paris, having won in 2013 and 2015.[29][30][31] With this victory, he ranked world number one, and had an all-ippon tournament.

Fighting style[edit]

He is known for having a more modern style of fighting than traditional Japanese judo, with kata guruma being one of his favorite techniques.[32]

Rivalries[edit]

Takato's international rivals include Dashdavaagiin Amartüvshin, Kim Won-jin, Yeldos Smetov, Ganbatyn Boldbaatar and Beslan Mudranov. He has competed against them a total of twenty times.[citation needed]

Personal life[edit]

Takato married in 2014 and has a son who was born on 25 August that year.[33]

Competitive record[edit]

Judo record[34]
Total 84 (100%)
Wins 74 (88.1%)
by Ippon 50 (59.5%)
Losses 10 (11.9%)
by Ippon 8 (9.5%)

(as of 11 February 2017)

Medal record[edit]

2009
1st, gold medalist(s) World U17 Championships −60 kg, Budapest
2011
1st, gold medalist(s) World U20 Championships −60 kg, Cape Town
2nd, silver medalist(s) Grand Prix −60 kg, Qingdao
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Tokyo
2012
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Moscow
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Tokyo
1st, gold medalist(s) World Cup −60 kg, Tashkent
2013
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Paris
1st, gold medalist(s) Masters −60 kg, Tyumen
1st, gold medalist(s) World Championships −60 kg, Rio de Janeiro
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Tokyo
2014
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Prix −60 kg, Budapest
3rd, bronze medalist(s) World Championships −60 kg, Chelyabinsk
2015
1st, gold medalist(s) Masters −60 kg, Tyumen
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Paris
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Tokyo
2016
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Olympic Games −60 kg, Rio de Janeiro
2nd, silver medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Tokyo
2017
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Paris
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Slam −60 kg, Tokyo
2018
1st, gold medalist(s) Grand Prix −60 kg, Zagreb

References[edit]

  1. ^ IJF profile
  2. ^ "Judobase.org". www.judobase.org. Retrieved 13 February 2017.
  3. ^ "World Championships Rio de Janeiro, Event, JudoInside". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  4. ^ "IJF World Masters Tyumen, Event, JudoInside". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  5. ^ "Grand Slam Paris, Event, JudoInside". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  6. ^ "Grand Slam Tokyo, Event, JudoInside". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  7. ^ "IJF Grand Slam Moscow, Event, JudoInside". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  8. ^ "International Judo Federation". www.intjudo.eu. Archived from the original on 19 August 2016. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  9. ^ "International Judo Federation". www.intjudo.eu. Archived from the original on 19 August 2016. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  10. ^ "IJF World Rankings 2014" (PDF). International Judo Federation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  11. ^ "Naohisa Takato, Judoka, JudoInside". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  12. ^ "JudoInside – News – Naohisa Takato back at the top U60kg". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  13. ^ "JudoInside – News – Naohisa Takato back at highest platform with Masters victory". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  14. ^ "JudoInside – News – Who are the most searched judoka on the planet?". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  15. ^ "JudoInside – News – Who are the most searched judoka on the planet?". www.judoinside.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  16. ^ Nagatsuka, Kaz (2 May 2016). "Inoue determined to help Japan keep pace in judo". The Japan Times Online. ISSN 0447-5763. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  17. ^ "Japan announces team for Rio, Ono is in". www.100judo.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  18. ^ "Friday 11th February: Are we being honest with our judo players?". Mick's Judo Blog. 12 February 2010. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  19. ^ "東海大学体育会柔道部 | 男子部員". www.tokai-judo.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  20. ^ Judo (1 December 2016), gs jpn2016 m 0060 0021, retrieved 14 February 2017
  21. ^ Judo (1 December 2016), gs jpn2016 m 0060 0032, retrieved 14 February 2017
  22. ^ JUDO SENIOR (6 December 2016), 60 kg ¤ GM ¤ NAGAYAMA (JPN) – TAKATO (JPN) ¤ Judo 2016 Grand Slam Tokyo ¤ 35, retrieved 14 February 2017
  23. ^ "Japan dominates on first day of the Tokyo Grand Slam". euronews. 2 December 2016. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  24. ^ "Wide consensus for the adapted rules of the next Olympic Cycle". Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  25. ^ "International Judo Federation publishes new rules for Tokyo 2020 Olympic cycle". Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  26. ^ "Paris Grand Slam 2017, France PREVIEW". www.judocrazy.com. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  27. ^ Shimbun, The Yomiuri. "Coming to grips: Japan benefits from new rules in judo". The Japan News. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  28. ^ Judo (11 February 2017), gs fra2017 m 0060 0055, retrieved 14 February 2017
  29. ^ Aishuaknews (11 February 2017), Judo Paris 2017. LUTFILLAEV Sharafuddin (UZB) vs TAKATO Naohisa (JPN) 60 kg Gold, retrieved 14 February 2017
  30. ^ "Takato, Abe, Hashimoto capture gold at Grand Slam Paris". The Japan Times Online. 12 February 2017. ISSN 0447-5763. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  31. ^ "Naohisa Takato completes Paris hat-trick". Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  32. ^ "Judo Crazy: Naohisa Takato's evolving kata-guruma". www.judocrazy.com. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  33. ^ "World Champion Takato announces marriage and baby". Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  34. ^ "Judobase.org". www.judobase.org. Retrieved 29 June 2016.

External links[edit]