Naresh Chandra

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Naresh Chandra
Naresh Chandra July 2012.jpg
Indian Ambassador to the United States
In office
1996–2001
PresidentShankar Dayal Sharma (1997–2001)
Kocheril Raman Narayanan (1996–1997)
Preceded bySiddhartha Shankar Ray
Succeeded byLalit Mansingh
13th Governor of Gujarat
In office
1 July 1995 – 1 March 1996
Preceded bySarup Singh
Succeeded byKrishna Pal Singh
20th Cabinet Secretary of India
In office
11 December 1990 – 31 July 1992
PresidentRamaswamy Venkataraman
Preceded byV. C. Pande
Succeeded byS. Rajagopal
Home Secretary of India
In office
1 March 1990 – 1 December 1990
22nd Defence Secretary of India
In office
1 February 1989 – 1 March 1990
Preceded byN.N. Vohra
Succeeded byT.N. Sheshan
Water Resources Secretary of India
In office
1 February 1987 – 1 February 1989
Personal details
Born(1934-08-01)1 August 1934
Allahabad, United Provinces, British India
Died9 July 2017(2017-07-09) (aged 82)
Panaji, Goa, India
Cause of deathMultiple organ failure
NationalityIndian
Alma materAllahabad University
OccupationRetired IAS officer
AwardsIND Padma Vibhushan BAR.png Padma Vibhushan (2007)

Naresh Chandra (1 August 1934 – 9 July 2017) was a 1956 batch IAS officer of Rajasthan cadre, who served as the Cabinet Secretary of India, Defence Secretary of India, Home Secretary of India, Water Resources Secretary of India and Indian Ambassador to the United States.[1] He was awarded India's second highest civilian honour, the Padma Vibhushan, for civil service, in 2007.[2][3][4]

Early life[edit]

Chandra was educated in Allahabad and obtained a postgraduate degree (MSc) in Maths from the Allahabad University.[1][5][6][7]

Career[edit]

Before IAS[edit]

Naresh Chandra served as a lecturer in the Allahabad University before his selection as an IAS officer.[1]

As an IAS officer[edit]

Naresh Chandra served in various key capacities for both the Government of Rajasthan and the Union Government,[1][5][6][7] like as the Chief Secretary of Rajasthan, Commissioner and Secretary (Finance), Secretary (Industries) and Chairman of Rajasthan Electricity Board, and as the District Magistrate and Collector of Jodhpur, Jhunjhunu and Bharatpur districts in the Government of Rajasthan,[1][5][6][7] and as the Cabinet Secretary of India, Union Home Secretary, Union Defence Secretary, Union Water Resources Secretary, Joint Secretary in the Department of Heavy Industries of the Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises, Director in the secretariat of Third Central Pay Commission, Deputy Secretary in the secretariat of Administrative Reforms Commission and as a Deputy Secretary in the Ministry of Agriculture in the Union Government.[1][5][6][7][8]

Naresh Chandra also served as an Adviser to the Governor of Jammu and Kashmir in 1986 for a duration of eight months.[1][5][6][7][8] Chandra also served as Adviser (Export Industrialization and Policy) for the Commonwealth Secretariat in Colombo, Sri Lanka.[1][5][6][7][8]

Post his superannuation from the service as the Cabinet Secretary of India,[5][6][7] Chandra was appointed as a Senior Adviser in the Prime Minister's Office (PMO),[1][5][6][7] and hence was deemed to have been reemployed into the IAS.[1][5][6][7]

Chief Secretary of Rajasthan[edit]

Chandra was appointed as the Chief Secretary of Rajasthan by the Chief Minister of Rajasthan,[1][5][6][7] he assumed the office of the Chief Secretary on 1 July 1985,[1][5][6][7] and demitted on 1 March 1986.[1][5][6][7]

Water Resources Secretary of India[edit]

Chandra was appointed as the Union Water Resources Secretary by the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet (ACC),[1][5][6][7] he assumed the office on 1 February 1987,[1][5][6][7] and demitted it on 1 February 1989,[1][5][6][7] after serving for two years.[1][5][6][7]

Defence Secretary of India[edit]

Chandra was appointed as the Union Defence Secretary by the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet (ACC),[1][5][6][7] he assumed the office of the Defence Secretary on 1 February 1989,[1][5][6][7] and demitted it on 1 March 1990.[1][5][6][7]

Home Secretary of India[edit]

Chandra was appointed as the Union Home Secretary by the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet (ACC),[1][5][6][7] he assumed the office of the Home Secretary on 1 March 1990,[1][5][6][7] and demitted it on 1 December 1990.[1][5][6][7]

Cabinet Secretary of India[edit]

Chandra was appointed as the Union Cabinet Secretary by the Appointments Committee of the Cabinet (ACC),[1][5][6][7][8] he assumed the office of the Cabinet Secretary on 1 December 1990,[1][5][6][7][8] and demitted it and simultaneously superannuated from service on 1 December 1990.[1][5][6][7][8]

As the Cabinet Secretary, Chandra was incharge and coordinator of India's nuclear programme,[7][8][9][10][11] Shekhar Gupta described him as the "Keeper of India's family silver".[7][8][9][10][11]

After IAS[edit]

Governor of Gujarat[edit]

After his tenure in the PMO,[8] Chandra was appointed as the Governor of Gujarat by the President of India,[8] he assumed the office of Governor on 1 July 1995 and demitted it on 1 March 1996.[8]

Ambassador of India to the United States of America[edit]

Naresh Chandra in Delhi on 23 July 2012.

Chandra was appointed as the Indian Ambassador to the United States by the Prime Minister of India in 1996,[1][6][7][8] he was confirmed to the diplomatic position by the President of the United States of America in 1996,[1][6][7][8] he remained as the Ambassador of India to the United States till 2001.[1][6][7][8]

Chandra's long official association with the United States spans more than three decades, beginning with his first visit to this country in 1963-64.[1][8][12] He has been the Indian Co-chairman of the US-India Technology Group, and Member of the Indo-US Economic Sub-Commission, which lent him valuable insight into the broad range of Indo-US relations.[1][12] Following the economic liberalisation program in India, he led the first official delegation to the US in 1992 to promote US investments in India.[1][8][12] He has been deeply involved in several important conferences organised subsequently in the US by business development groups.[1][8][12]

Post Ambassadorship[edit]

The government approved of setting up of Serious Fraud Investigation Office (SFIO) on 9 January 2003, on the basis of the recommendations made by the Naresh Chandra Committee which was set up by the government on 21 August 2002 on Corporate Governance

His work in his words[edit]

‘Living in interesting times’ is how I would describe my tenure here. Something or the other has always been happening. There was a lot of interaction on the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty when I first arrived here. 1997 was a ‘feel good’ time – we were celebrating 50 years of Independence - there were series of functions and events – in fact we had more functions in the U.S. than in India. The major challenge came in May 1998 - dealing with the nuclear test. I remember going from one studio to another – TV, radio, and press – in addition to dozens of meetings in the Senate and the Congress. That was the most difficult and a very challenging period of my tenure here. Then began the rounds of discussions between Indian delegation, led by Jaswant Singh, and the U.S. delegation led by Talbot. I was present in every meeting and throughout. We saw the scene develop from a very tense dialogue into a very friendly and frank exchange of views. This brought about stability and progress in a positive direction in our relations with the U.S.

The Prime Minister’s visit in September 1998 was also an important one. It dissipated the demonising of India that had gone on before his arrival. People saw him and heard him speak. His statement that "India and the U.S. can be natural allies in the 21st century" struck a chord in the U.S. administration. President Clinton’s visit to India and then the return visit of the Indian Prime Minister put a feel on it. I witnessed a very fine chapter in the Indo-U.S. relations.

A specific instance that I will remember of my tenure, is the establishment of Gandhi Memorial - Mahatma Gandhi’s statue – in front of our Chancery building in Washington DC – and the way it was accomplished against heavy odds. We were able to have it up just in time to have it dedicated by the Prime Minister of India in the presence of the president of the United States on 16 September 2000. It was a great moment – for South Asians and Americans. I also received many messages from our friends in Pakistan – and the Pakistan Ambassador congratulated me and expressed her happiness at the establishment of the statue.[13]

Death[edit]

Chandra died at a hospital in Panaji, Goa, India, of multiple organ failure on 9 July 2017 at the age of 82.[6][14][15]

Awards and recognition[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag "Naresh Chandra". International Crisis Group. Archived from the original on 12 September 2009. Retrieved 23 January 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Padma Vibhushan for Nariman, Khushwant, Naresh Chandra". The Indian Express. New Delhi. January 26, 2007. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Padma Vibhushan for Khushwant, Nariman". The Hindu. New Delhi. January 26, 2007. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Padma Vibhushan for Fali Nariman, Khushwant Singh". Daily News and Analysis. New Delhi. January 26, 2007. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "Naresh Chandra - Executive Record Sheet". Department of Personnel and Training, Government of India. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac "Naresh Chandra dies: The 'finest' diplomat represented India during most difficult time; know about him". The Financial Express. New Delhi. July 10, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad Sood, Rakesh (July 11, 2017). "The man with the clues". The Hindu. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Goswami, Omkar (July 11, 2017). "Naresh Chandra: The bureaucrat who spoke the right words, and nothing more". The Economic Times. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Gupta, Shekhar (July 15, 2017). "Shekhar Gupta: Keeper of India's family silver". Business Standard. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  10. ^ a b Sitapati, Vinay (July 11, 2017). "A Patriot And A Gentleman". The Indian Express. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  11. ^ a b Agarwal, Anil (July 12, 2017). "A tribute to Naresh Chandra: Our guiding light". The Economic Times. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  12. ^ a b c d "Naresh Chandra". The South Asian. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  13. ^ "Mr. Naresh Chandra". The South Asian. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  14. ^ Kamat, Prakash (July 10, 2017). "Former Indian Ambassador to US Naresh Chandra passes away in Goa". The Hindu. Panaji. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  15. ^ "Former Indian Ambassador to the US Naresh Chandra dies". Outlook. New Delhi. 9 July 2017. Retrieved 9 July 2017.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Siddhartha Shankar Ray
Indian Ambassador to the United States
1996–2001
Succeeded by
Lalit Mansingh