Nasir-ol-molk Mosque

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Nasir al-Mulk Mosque
Nasir al- mulk mosque, Shiraz.jpg
Interior view
Religion
AffiliationIslam
ProvinceFars Province
StatusActive
Location
LocationIran Shiraz, Iran
MunicipalityShiraz County
Nasir-ol-molk Mosque is located in Iran
Nasir-ol-molk Mosque
Shown within Iran
Geographic coordinates29°36′31″N 52°32′54″E / 29.60861°N 52.54833°E / 29.60861; 52.54833Coordinates: 29°36′31″N 52°32′54″E / 29.60861°N 52.54833°E / 29.60861; 52.54833
Architecture
TypeMosque
StyleIranian architecture
Completed1888
Website
http://nasiralmulk.ir/

The Nasir al-Mulk Mosque (Persian: مسجد نصیر الملکMasjed-i Nasir al-Mulk), also known as the Pink Mosque (مسجد صورتی Masjed-i Surati), is a traditional mosque in Shiraz, Iran. It is located in Gawd-i Arabān quarter, near Shāh Chérāgh Mosque. It was built during Qajar dynasty rule of Iran.

The mosque includes extensive coloured glass in its facade, and displays other traditional elements such as the Panj Kāse ("five concaved") design. It is named in popular culture as the 'Pink Mosque',[1] due to the usage of considerable pink colour tiles for its interior design.[2]

History[edit]

The mosque was built during the Qajar dynasty, and is still in use under protection by the Endowment Foundation of Nasir ol Molk. Construction began in 1876 by the order of Mirzā Hasan Ali (Nasir ol Molk), a Qajar ruler. and was completed in 1888, [3] The designers were Mohammad Hasan-e-Memār, an Iranian architect, and Mohammad Rezā Kāshi-Sāz-e-Širāzi.[4]

See also[edit]

Media related to Nasir-ol-molk Mosque at Wikimedia Commons

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mosque of Whirling Colours: A Mixture of Architecture and Art in Nasīr al-Mulk Mosque in Shiraz, Iran Archived 2016-05-11 at the Wayback Machine, Cem Nizamoglu, MuslimHeritage.com
  2. ^ CNN: Why your next vacation could be in Iran, Frederik Pleitgen – 14 July 2015
  3. ^ Stunning Mosque In Iran Becomes A Magnificent Kaleidoscope When The Sun Rises, DeMilked Magazine
  4. ^ Baker, Patricia; Smith, Hilary; Oleynik, Maria (28 May 2018). "Iran". Bradt Travel Guides. Retrieved 28 May 2018 – via Google Books.

External links[edit]