National Appliance Energy Conservation Act

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National Appliance Energy Conservation Act
Great Seal of the United States
Long title An Act to amend the Energy Policy and Conservation Act with respect to energy conservation standards for appliances.
Acronyms (colloquial) NAECA
Nicknames National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987
Enacted by the 100th United States Congress
Effective March 17, 1987
Citations
Public law 100-12
Statutes at Large 101 Stat. 103
Codification
Titles amended 42 U.S.C.: Public Health and Social Welfare
U.S.C. sections amended
Legislative history
Major amendments

The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (NAECA; Pub.L. 100–12, 101 Stat. 103, enacted March 17, 1987) is a United States Act of Congress that regulates energy consumption of specific household appliances. Though minimum Energy Efficiency Standards were first established by the United States Congress in Part B of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), those standards were then amended by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the Energy Policy Act of 2005.[1]

All of these laws and regulations have to do with creating mandatory standards that deal with the energy efficiency of certain household appliances. These standards were put in place to ensure that manufacturers were building products that are at the maximum energy efficiency levels are that are technically feasible and economically justified.[2]

History[edit]

The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1975 (NAECA) was enacted to help create uniform appliance efficiency standards at a time when individual states were creating their own standards.[3] The NAECA established a conservation program for major household appliances, however no real standards came into existence until the 1980s when appliance manufacturers realized it was easier to conform to a uniform federal standard then individual state standards.[3]

The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 amended the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and was introduced and supported by democratic Senator Bennett Johnston, Jr. from Louisiana in January 1987.[4] The new amendments to the act established minimum efficiency standards for many household appliances, including:[3]

  • Refrigerators
  • Refrigerator-Freezers
  • Freezers
  • Room Air Conditioner
  • Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts
  • Incandescent Reflector Lamps
  • Clothes Dryers
  • Clothes Washers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen Ranges and Ovens
  • Pool Heaters
  • Television Sets (withdrawn in 1995)
  • Water Heaters

Congress set the initial efficiency standards at the start of the act then set a schedule for the United States Department of Energy to review them.[3] The act also put into place laws prohibiting manufacturers from making any representations about the energy efficiency of any product on this list without first being tested by Federal testing procedure, and disclosing the results of such tests.[4] Lastly the new act set new rules for when state regulations will be superseded by federal regulations in regard to testing and labeling requirements, and energy conservation standards.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Laws and Regulations". Appliances & Commercial Equipment Standards. U.S. DOE. Retrieved 25 March 2011. |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  2. ^ "About Standards". Appliances & Commercial Equipment Standards. U.S. DOE. Retrieved 18 April 2011. |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  3. ^ a b c d "History of Federal Appliance Standards". Appliances & Commercial Equipment Standards. U.S. DOE. Retrieved 18 March 2011. |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  4. ^ a b c "Bill Summary & Status". National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987. Library of Congress. Retrieved 22 April 2011. |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)