National Child Traumatic Stress Network

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The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is on organization whose "mission is to raise the standard of care and improve access to services for traumatized children, their families, and communities".[1] According to its website, the NCTSN "offers training, support, and resources to providers who work with children and families exposed to a wide range of traumatic experiences, including physical and sexual abuse; domestic, school, and community violence; natural disasters, terrorism, or military family challenges; and life-threatening injury and illness.[1]

The NCTSN is coordinated by the UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCCTS),[1] and is a collaboration that as of 2009 has 60 members[2] and a network of more than 150 centers and thousands of partners throughout the US.[1] It was named in honor of Yale physician Donald J. Cohen, and was established in 2000 by the US Congress.

The NCTSN is a helpful resource for dealing with tragedies like the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "The History of the NCTSN". National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Retrieved December 16, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Who we are". National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Retrieved December 16, 2012. 
  3. ^ Cisneros, Lisa (December 16, 2012). "UCSF Child-Trauma Expert Offers Advice on How to Talk to Kids". HealthCanal.com. Retrieved December 16, 2012. 

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