National Coalition Against Domestic Violence

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National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
NCADV-NewLogo-edited.jpg
Abbreviation NCADV
Formation September 22, 1978; 38 years ago (1978-09-22)[3]
91-1081344[2]
Legal status 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization[1]
Headquarters Denver, Colorado, United States
Coordinates 39°43′01″N 104°59′16″W / 39.7170634°N 104.9878785°W / 39.7170634; -104.9878785Coordinates: 39°43′01″N 104°59′16″W / 39.7170634°N 104.9878785°W / 39.7170634; -104.9878785
Area served
United States
Rose Garrity[4]
Ruth M. Glenn[5]
Revenue (2015)
$1,274,194[6]
Expenses (2015) $665,549[6]
Employees (2014)
8[2]
Volunteers (2014)
4[2]
Mission To provide leadership in developing feminist models for programs working to improve services to women who have been battered, to provide a national communication and resource network for battered women, and to form a national voice around battered women's issues and other important issues affecting women.[2]
Website www.ncadv.org

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence focuses on domestic violence in the home, society-wide violence, and factors that perpetuate violence against women and children. Founded in 1978, its goal is to “organize for collective power by advancing transformative work, thinking, and leadership in communities and individuals who seek to end violence in our lives.” [7]

Services and accomplishments[edit]

Cosmetic and Reconstructive Support[edit]

Cosmetic and Reconstructive Support program helps survivors of domestic violence receive facial, dental, and dermatological reconstruction necessary to live a healthy life and move forward from their traumatic past. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence works with three medical associations including Face to Face, Give Back a Smile, and a Skin Care Outreach Empowers Survivors.

Rebuilding Guide for Victims[edit]

In 2001, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence partnered with The National Endowment for Financial Education to produce a manual, titled Hope & Power for Your Personal Finances: A Rebuilding Guide Following Domestic Violence, which serves to inform and assist women who have been victims of domestic violence to regain financial freedom in their lives.[8] This program deals with topics including budgeting, banking, lending, dealing with workplace abuse, and identity theft. NCADV has held workshops designed to train individuals to have the skills necessary for participation in financial education. Trainers must know how to handle individuals who have sustained abuse in their past relationships, while at the same time offering advice and guiding them.

Work with survivors of Hurricane Katrina[edit]

Since 2005, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence worked with survivors of Hurricane Katrina, relocating women who had previously been staying at women's shelters throughout affected areas. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence has set up an outlet for other battered women's shelters throughout the country to advertise the availability of beds.

Day of Unity[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence sponsored the first annual Day of Unity in 1981.[9] Observations around the United States include recognizing victims who died as a result of domestic violence by wearing the color purple, and celebrations for the achievements of people fighting against domestic violence.[9]

Domestic Violence Awareness Month[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence created and observed the first Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October 1987.[10][11][12] Congress designated October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month in 1989.[13]

Domestic Violence Awareness Month's events promote awareness, encourage reporting, provide safety for victims, encourage people to look out for one another, and ensure treatment is provided and administrative action taken when needed.[14]

Domestic Violence Awareness Month has been observed each October since 1987.[12][15]

Remember My Name[edit]

In October 1994, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence teamed up with Ms Magazine to create "Remember My Name", a list of victims who have lost their lives to domestic violence.[16][17]

The Project records information about each victim who was killed, including their age at the time of death, the names and ages of surviving children, and the weapon used against them.[17] The project also documents information about each perpetrator, including relationship to victim, their name, age, and sentence received.[17]

Retaining detailed information helps defend against questions about the validity of domestic violence statistics.[17]

Free database of local domestic violence resources[edit]

In August 2014, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence launched domesticshelters.org, the first online searchable database of domestic violence agencies in the U.S. It partnered with a family foundation called Theresa's Fund in Arizona to identify approximately 3,000 agencies and gather data on each, and develop and launch the website. The service makes it easier for an individual to find relevant agencies based on proximity, language preference, and service needs.

Victim-centered conferences[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence sponsors conferences frequently in order to bring survivors and leaders together to freely speak on the topic of domestic violence and develop connections with one another.One of the most recent events was the 2008 National Coalition Against Domestic Violence Conference held July 18, 2008, in Washington D.C. The conference is held every two years and is a place for members to plan out future endeavors and commemorate past actions.[18]

Legislative policy advocacy[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence works with members of Congress to improve legislation dealing with domestic violence.

Responding to the problem of domestic violence offenders who fight with victims for custody of their children, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence advocates for legislation that keeps the best interest of the children in mind.

In 1994, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence was part of a team to pass the Violence Against Women Act to provide funding for investigation into domestic violence and prosecution of offenders.

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence has also helped with the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act, International Violence Against Women Act, and Legislative Action Day.

Media[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence creates public service announcements to help increase awareness of domestic violence and help women affected by it to call their National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233).[19]

In 2008, news releases report that television network ABC and their show 20/20 are in the process of considering airing an hour-long segment about a wife and mother suffering from domestic violence and receiving less-than-par treatment from the family court system.[20]

Training of law enforcement officers[edit]

In 1985, the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence applied for a grant from the United States Department of Justice to train police officers and other professionals to work with victims of family violence, to develop a model for others to use in starting shelters, and to distribute information and referral for victims of domestic violence.[21]

A director from the Free Congress Foundation opined that "pro-lesbian, hard-core feminists" should not receive a federal grant.[21] The Heritage Foundation also opposed the grant, calling the organization pro-lesbian and anti-family.

In response, the executive director of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence said, "We are made up of diverse groups of women. We're trying to stop violence against all women. I'm shocked that the lesbian issue is being used against women who are trying to help themselves."[21] She said they help all women who are victims of domestic violence, and that they do not discriminate against particular groups of women.[21]

After reviewing the grant application, the Department of Justice awarded the grant to National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.[22] The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence agreed in writing that the grant funds would not be used for pro-lesbian causes.[22]

Publications[edit]

Informational manuals and publications by National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and members include:

  • 2004 National Directory of Domestic Violence Programs
  • Teen Dating Violence Resource Manual
  • Open Minds, Open Doors
  • Guidelines for Mental Health Practitioners in Domestic Violence Cases
  • Advocating for Battered Women & Children in Custody, Visitation, and Protection Manual

History[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence began at the United States Commission on Civil Rights hearing on battered women. Beginning as 100 individuals, it became thousands of members working together and sharing their experiences with domestic violence, homophobia, sexism, racism, and ageism. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence was officially incorporated as a nonprofit organization on September 22, 1978.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Coalition Against Domestic Violence". Exempt Organizations Select Check. Internal Revenue Service. Retrieved September 16, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d "Form 990: Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax". National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Guidestar. December 31, 2014.
  3. ^ a b "National Coalition Against Domestic Violence". Business Name Search. Corporation Division. Oregon Office of the Secretary of State. Retrieved September 15, 2016.
  4. ^ "Board of Directors". National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Accessed on January 20, 2016.
  5. ^ "Staff". National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Accessed on January 20, 2016.
  6. ^ a b "National Coalition Against Domestic Violence". Charities Database. Colorado Secretary of State. Retrieved September 15, 2016.
  7. ^ National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. 2005. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Denver, CO. 23 Nov. 2008 <http://www.ncadv.org/>
  8. ^ National Endowment for Financial Education: A Nonprofit Foundation Partnering for Financial Well-being. 2007. National Endowment for Financial Education, Greenwood Village, CO. 24 Nov. 2008 <http://www.nefe.org/>
  9. ^ a b "Unity Day to protest violence". The Daily Oklahoman. September 27, 1983.
  10. ^ Goodnow, Cecelia. "Therapist Chronicles 33 Tales of Women Who Esaped Abuse". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. September 18, 1987.
  11. ^ Barton, M. "Domestic Violence Awareness Month". The Lawton Constitution (Lawton, Oklahoma). October 23, 1988.
  12. ^ a b Thompson, Bill. "Awareness of domestic violence increases in October". The Tampa Tribune. October 1, 1997.
  13. ^ Letts, Sharon. "Nesting: Making a loving nest". Times-Standard (Eureka, California). September 25, 2008.
  14. ^ "Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2015". Targeted News Service. October 16, 2015.
  15. ^ Magrath, Shawn. "Catholic Charities recognizes Domestic Violence Awareness Month". The Evening Sun (Norwich, New York). October 29, 2015.
  16. ^ Krantz, Laura Jett. "Victims of domestic violence remembered". The Paris News (Paris, Texas). October 7, 2001.
  17. ^ a b c d "Annual Poster Will List Women Killed By Spouse: 'Remember My Name' Project Will Put Face on Domestic Violence, National Coalition Says". Rocky Mountain News. October 9, 1994.
  18. ^ Feminist Majority Foundation Online. 2007. Feminist Majority Foundation, Beverly Hills, CA. 23 Nov. 2008
  19. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WL3rfk2iFww
  20. ^ Randi James. 2008. Randi James. 24 Nov. 2008 <http://www.randijames.com>
  21. ^ a b c d "Conservatives Oppose U.S. Grant to Group Helping Battered Women". Newsday. Long Island, New York: The Seattle Times. p. A2. 
  22. ^ a b "Justice Dept. Aids Victims of Battering". Associated Press. The Seattle Times. August 11, 1985. p. A8. 

External links[edit]