National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017

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National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017
Great Seal of the United States
Long title An act to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2017 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.
Acronyms (colloquial) NDAA 17
Enacted by the 114th United States Congress
Citations
Public law Pub.L. 114–328
Legislative history

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (H.R. 4909; NDAA 2017) is a United States proposed federal bill which specifies the budget and expenditures of the United States Department of Defense (DOD) for Fiscal Year 2017.

History[edit]

National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 law also authorizes "Department of Energy national security programs", benefits for military personnel and their families, and includes "authorities to facilitate" ongoing international operations for the Fiscal Year 2017. It includes a new bill passed against Russian propaganda to counter the spread of biased information.[citation needed] "Also called the Countering Information Warfare Act of 2016 (S. 2692)".[citation needed] The total of $618.7 billion in spending, over $67 billion of which is destined for the overseas contingency operations account. It notably leaves restrictions in place on transferring Guantanamo Bay detainees to the United States mainland, and elevates Cyber Command to combatant command status.[1][2]

On March 20, 2017, President Donald Trump sent a presidential memorandum to the Secretary of State delegating the functions and authorities vested in the President by section 3132 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328).[3][4] On September 8, 2017, President Trump sent a memorandum to the Secretary of State and Secretary of the Treasury with further delegations to the financial sanctions of certain countries on the list under section 1263 of the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act.[5][6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ KHEEL, REBECCA. "Obama signs annual defense policy bill into law". The Hill. The Hill. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  2. ^ Zengerle, Patricia. "U.S. Congress passes $618.7 billion annual defense bill". Reuters. Reuters. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  3. ^ Office of the Press Secretary (March 20, 2017). "Presidential Memorandum on the Delegation of Authority Under the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017". whitehouse.gov. Washington, D.C.: White House. Retrieved March 21, 2017. 
  4. ^ "Delegation of Authority Under the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017" (PDF). Federal Register. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. April 8, 2017. Archived from the original on April 10, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2017. 
  5. ^ Office of the Press Secretary (September 8, 2017). "Presidential Memorandum regarding the Delegation of Authority under the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act". whitehouse.gov. Washington, D.C.: White House. Retrieved October 3, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Delegation of Authority under the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act". News For The World. Singapore: Blogger. WordPress. September 9, 2017. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017. Retrieved October 3, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Delegation of Authority under the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act to the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury, 201" (PDF). Federal Register. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. September 8, 2017. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved October 3, 2017.