National Domestic Violence Hotline

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The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a 24-hour confidential service that can be reached through calling or online chatting.[1] The NDVH was created through the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in the United States. The Domestic Violence Hotline offers a variety of help options. [1]The website offers help for victims, survivors, family and friends of victims, and people who are concerned that they might be harming another person.[1] The website has different tabs to educate people on different topics such as violence in the LGBTQ community, advocate information, what to expect when calling the hotline, and education about domestic violence. [1]The National Domestic Abuse Hotline is partnered with two outside organizations which are Break the Cycle and Loveisrespect.[1]

Domestic Violence in the LGBTQ Community[edit]

The Hotline is aware that domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of sex, gender, race, or sexual orientation. [2] Research shows that people in LGBTQ relationships often use the same tools to gain power over their partner as in heterosexual relationships.[2] These tactics can include using children, privilege, isolation and emotional abuse to name a few. [2] There are additional resources for people in LGBTQ relationships such as the NW Network. [3] The NW Network was founded by and for LGBT survivors of abuse. [3] Forge is also a great resource to learn about the rights of transgender domestic and sexual assault. [4]

Break the Cycle[edit]

Break the Cycle is a partner of both the National Domestic Violence Hotline and Loveisrespect. [5] Break the Cycle was founded in 1996, to help provide a resource for young people, specifically ages 12 -24, experiencing dating violence. Break the Cycle provides leadership and education opportunities to teach young people about healthy relationships.[6] Let’s Be Real (LBR) is an online/ offline movement for people under the age of 24 to come together and have conversations about relationships such as sexuality, break-ups, and first-time hookups.[7]

Loveisrespect[edit]

Educational Card from Jennifer Ann's Group featuring the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline

Loveisrespect, a 24-hour national Web-based and telephone resource, was created to help teens (ages 13–18) experiencing dating abuse, and is the only helpline in the country serving all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. It was launched February 8, 2007 by the National Domestic Violence Hotline and partnered with Break the Cycle in 2011.[8] In addition to the telephone hotline there is a text feature, and a live chat option, which allows teens to connect to trained peer advocates via the web. [8]

Featured on loveisrespect's website is the Teen Dating Bill of Rights, a set of affirmations and pledges for teens reflecting the importance of awareness of dating abuse and the need for young people to take a stand and nurture healthy relationships.[9]

Dating Bill of Rights[edit]

Featured on loveisrespect's website is the Teen Dating Bill of Rights,[10] a set of affirmations and pledges for teens reflecting the importance of awareness of dating abuse and the need for young people to take a stand and nurture healthy relationships.

Teen Dating Bill of Rights

I have the right:
- To always be treated with respect.
- To be in a healthy relationship.
- To not be hurt physically or emotionally.
- To refuse sex or affection at anytime.
- To have friends and activities apart from my boyfriend or girlfriend.
- To end a relationship.

I pledge to:
- Always treat my boyfriend or girlfriend with respect.
- Never hurt my boyfriend or girlfriend physically, verbally, or emotionally.
- Respect my girlfriend's or boyfriend's decisions concerning sex and affection.
- Not be controlling or manipulative in my relationship.
- Accept responsibility for myself and my actions.

Hotline description[edit]

The hotline is 100% confidential.[11] Hotline operators, whom the NDVH call advocates, are given a series of training and practice sessions prior to answering calls and are instructed to ask the caller a series of questions to ensure that the caller is safe, ascertain the situation, and then help the caller determine a course of action.[11][12] The hotline is intended to be used by not only people experiencing domestic violence, but also people who feel that they are beginning to show signs of abusing their partner. [11] The hotline advocate will help the caller by asking questions to identify red flags, and teach the caller techniques on how to calm down. [11]

The hotline operates 24/7, is available in over 170 different languages, and is additionally open to calls from undocumented immigrants.[13][14] The NDVH's website also provides information on a variety of topics about domestic abuse, which includes the definition of abuse and its warning signs.[15] The website also offers tips for victims and survivors, along with statistics and helpful resources, as well as information on how to lead healthy relationships[16][17][18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "About Us - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-25.
  2. ^ a b c "LGBTQ Abuse - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  3. ^ a b "Who We Are". The NW Network. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  4. ^ http://forge-forward.org/wp-content/docs/know-your-rights-VAWA-fact-sheet.pdf
  5. ^ "About Us". Break the Cycle. 2014-03-14. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  6. ^ "About Us". Break the Cycle. 2014-03-14.
  7. ^ "Join Let's Be Real". Break the Cycle. 2016-05-02. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  8. ^ a b "About Loveisrespect.org". Loveisrespect.org. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  9. ^ "Teen Dating Bill of Rights - Love is respect - National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline". 2008-07-25. Retrieved 2018-04-21.
  10. ^ www.loveisrespect.org
  11. ^ a b c d "What to Expect When You Contact Us - The Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  12. ^ "Meet Our Advocates - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  13. ^ "Media Room - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-21.
  14. ^ "Abuse & Immigrants - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-05-18.
  15. ^ "Is This Abuse? - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  16. ^ "Help for Survivors - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  17. ^ "Resources - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.
  18. ^ "Healthy Relationships - The National Domestic Violence Hotline". The National Domestic Violence Hotline. Retrieved 2018-04-18.

External links[edit]

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence