National Film Award for Best Female Playback Singer

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National Film Award for Best Female Playback Singer
National award for contributions to Indian Cinema
Awarded forBest Vocal Rendition of Songs by a Female Playback Singer
Sponsored byDirectorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$720)
First awarded1968
Last awarded2018
Most recent winnerBindhumalini Narayanaswamy
Highlights
Most awardsK. S. Chithra
(6 awards)
Total awarded50
First winnerP. Susheela

The National Film Award for Best Female Playback Singer, officially known as the Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Female Playback Singer (Hindi pronunciation: [rədʒət̪ kəməl]), is an honour presented annually at the National Film Awards of India since 1968 to female playback singers for the best rendition of songs from soundtracks within the Indian film industry.[1] Called the "State Awards for Films" when established in 1954, the National Film Awards ceremony is older than the Directorate of Film Festivals. The State Awards instituted the individual award in 1969 as the "Award for the Best Female Playback Singer;" in 1975, it was renamed as the "Rajat Kamal Award for the Best Female Playback Singer."[1][2][3][4] Throughout the past 51 years, accounting for repeat winners, the Government of India has presented a total of 50 Best Female Playback Singer Awards to 28 different singers. No award was given for this category in 1974.

Until 1973, winners of the National Film Award received a plaque.[3] From 1975–2006, they were awarded with a "Rajat Kamal" (Silver Lotus) certificate and a cash prize of 10,000 (US$140);[4][5] and since 2007, cash reward of 50,000 (US$720) alongside the certificate have been bestowed upon them.[6] Although the Indian film industry produces films in around 20 languages and dialects,[1] the singers whose performances have won awards have worked in nine major languages: Tamil (fourteen awards), Hindi (fourteen awards), Bengali (six awards),[a] Telugu (six awards), Marathi (five awards),[a] Malayalam (three awards), Assamese (one award), Konkani (one award) and Kannada (one award).

The first recipient was P. Susheela, who was honoured at the 16th National Film Awards in 1969 for her renditions in the Tamil film Uyarndha Manithan. The singer who won the most number of Rajat Kamal awards is K. S. Chithra with six wins, followed by Susheela with five. As of 2019, two singers—S. Janaki and Shreya Ghoshal—have won the award four times, and two—Lata Mangeshkar and Vani Jairam—have won it thrice. The award has been won twice by Asha Bhosle, Alka Yagnik and Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar. Janaki, Chithra and Ghoshal are the only singers to get the award for their works in films of three different languages. Janaki was bestowed with the awards for her performances in two Tamil films: 16 Vayathinile and Thevar Magan in 1978 and 1993 respectively, in 1981 for the Malayalam film Oppol, and in 1985 for the Telugu film Sitaara. Chithra was honoured in 1986, 1997 and 2005 for the Tamil films Sindhu Bhairavi, Minsara Kanavu and Autograph respectively; in 1987 and 1989 for the Malayalam films Nakhakshathangal and Vaisali respectively; and in 1998 for the Hindi film Virasat. Ghoshal received her awards for the Hindi films Devdas, Paheli and Jab We Met in 2003, 2006 and 2008 respectively; was awarded for the fourth time in 2009 for both the Bengali film Antaheen and the Marathi film Jogwa. Susheela, Jairam and Ankalikar-Tikekar have each been awarded for their perfomances in films of two different languages. Since her first win, Susheela bagged a second award for another Tamil film Savaale Samali in 1972, and three more in 1977, 1983 and 1984 for her songs in the Telugu films Siri Siri Muvva, Meghasandesam and MLA Edukondalu respectively. Jairam was rewarded on three occassions—in 1976 for the Tamil film Apoorva Raagangal, in 1979 for the Telugu film Sankarabharanam, and finally in 1992 for another Telugu film Swathi Kiranam. Apart from the being the only honoree to have been recognised for a Konkani film, Ankalikar-Tikekar—who was certified as the best female playback singer by the Directorate in 2007 for her contributions to the Konkani-language drama Antarnad—later joined the list of two-time winners of this award when the jury declared her the victor again in 2013 for her rendition of the song "Palakein Naa Moon Don" in the Marathi film Samhita. While Sandhya Mukhopadhyay and Ghoshal are the only awardees to have been recognised for their work in two different films in the same year (Mukhopadhyay won in 1971 for her tracks from both the Bengali films Jay Jayanti and Nishi Padma), Ghoshal continues to be the sole vocalist to have achieved this accolade for excellence in singing in two different films of different languages in a single year. Two-time consecutive winners of the Rajat Kamal include Mangeshkar, Susheela, Chithra (twice) and Ghoshal.

The late K. B. Sundarambal, who was 62 when she received the prize at the 17th National Film Awards in November 1970 for the Tamil film Thunaivan, holds the position of being the oldest recipient.[8][9] As of 2019, Uthara Unnikrishnan remains the youngest recipient of the Silver Lotus; she was presented with the award in May 2015 when she was 10, for her rendition of the song "Azhagu" in the Tamil film Saivam.[10] The most recent recipient is Bindhumalini Narayanaswamy, who was honoured at the 66th National Film Awards for her performance of the song "Maayavi Manave" in the 2018 film Nathicharami, marking the first occasion the Lotus went to a Kannada-language work.

Key[edit]

Symbol Meaning
double-dagger Indicates that the winner won the award for her work in two films in that year

Recipients[edit]

P. Susheela
P. Susheela is the first-ever recipient of the Best Female Playback Singer Award in 1969 for her contribution to the Tamil film Uyarndha Manithan. She has also been the second-most frequent winner (five times).
K. S. Chithra
With six wins across three different languages, K. S. Chithra is the most awarded vocalist in this category. She is also the only singer to have won two prizes consecutively on two separate occassions—first in 1986 and 1987 and then again in 1997 and 1998.
S. Janaki
Shreya Ghoshal
S. Janaki (top) and Shreya Ghoshal (bottom) are the singers who have been honoured four times. Both have received these recognitions for their work spanning three different languages. Ghoshal is also among the recipients to have won the award for performances in two different films in the same year.
Lata Mangeshkar
Vani Jairam
Lata Mangeshkar (top) and Vani Jairam (bottom) have won the award three times each.
Asha Bhosle
Alka Yagnik
Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar
Asha Bhosle (top), Alka Yagnik (middle) and Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar (bottom) have each bagged the award twice.
List of award recipients, showing the year, film(s) and language(s)
Year[b] Recipient(s) Work(s) Language(s) Refs.
1968
(16th)
P. Susheela Uyarndha Manithan Tamil [2]
1969
(17th)
K. B. Sundarambal Thunaivan Tamil [9]
1970
(18th)
double-dagger
Sandhya Mukhopadhyay  • Jay Jayanti
 • Nishi Padma
Bengali [9]
1971
(19th)
P. Susheela Savaale Samali Tamil [11]
1972
(20th)
Lata Mangeshkar Parichay Hindi [3]
1973
(21st)
Not Awarded [12]
1974
(22nd)
Lata Mangeshkar Kora Kagaz Hindi [4]
1975
(23rd)
Vani Jairam Apoorva Raagangal Tamil [13]
1976
(24th)
P. Susheela Siri Siri Muvva Telugu [11]
1977
(25th)
S. Janaki 16 Vayathinile[c] Tamil [14]
1978
(26th)
Chhaya Ganguli Gaman Hindi [15]
1979
(27th)
Vani Jairam Sankarabharanam Telugu [16]
1980
(28th)
S. Janaki Oppol Malayalam [17]
1981
(29th)
Asha Bhosle Umrao Jaan Hindi [18]
1982
(30th)
P. Susheela Meghasandesam Telugu [11]
1983
(31st)
P. Susheela MLA Edukondalu[d] Telugu [19]
1984
(32nd)
S. Janaki Sitaara Telugu [20]
1985
(33rd)
K. S. Chithra Sindhu Bhairavi Tamil [21]
1986
(34th)
K. S. Chithra Nakhakshathangal Malayalam [22]
1987
(35th)
Asha Bhosle Ijaazat Hindi [23]
1988
(36th)
K. S. Chithra Vaisali Malayalam [21]
1989
(37th)
Anuradha Paudwal Kalat Nakalat Marathi [24]
1990
(38th)
Lata Mangeshkar Lekin... Hindi [25]
1991
(39th)
Vani Jairam Swathi Kiranam Telugu [26]
1992
(40th)
S. Janaki Thevar Magan Tamil [27]
1993
(41st)
Alka Yagnik Hum Hain Rahi Pyar Ke Hindi [28]
1994
(42nd)
Swarnalatha Karuththamma[e] Tamil [29]
1995
(43rd)
Anjali Marathe Doghi Marathi [30]
1996
(44th)
K. S. Chithra Minsara Kanavu[f] Tamil [31]
1997
(45th)
K. S. Chithra Virasat[g] Hindi [32]
1998
(46th)
Alka Yagnik Kuch Kuch Hota Hai[h] Hindi [33]
1999
(47th)
Jayashree Dasgupta Paromitar Ek Din[i] Bengali [34]
2000
(48th)
Bhavatharini Bharathi[j] Tamil [35]
2001
(49th)
Sadhana Sargam Azhagi[k] Tamil [36]
2002
(50th)
Shreya Ghoshal Devdas[l] Hindi [37]
2003
(51st)
Tarali Sarma Akashitoraar Kathare Assamese [38]
2004
(52nd)
K. S. Chithra Autograph[m] Tamil [39]
2005
(53rd)
Shreya Ghoshal Paheli[n] Hindi [5]
2006
(54th)
Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar Antarnad Konkani [6]
2007
(55th)
Shreya Ghoshal Jab We Met Hindi [40]
2008
(56th)
double-dagger
Shreya Ghoshal  • Antaheen[o]
 • Jogwa[p]
 • Bengali
 • Marathi
[7]
2009
(57th)
Nilanjana Sarkar Houseful Bengali [41]
2010
(58th)
Rekha Bhardwaj Ishqiya Hindi [42]
2011
(59th)
Roopa Ganguly Abosheshey Bengali [43]
2012
(60th)
Arati Ankalikar-Tikekar Samhita[q] Marathi [44]
2013
(61st)
Bela Shende Tuhya Dharma Koncha[r] Marathi [45]
2014
(62nd)
Uthara Unnikrishnan Saivam[s] Tamil [46]
2015
(63rd)
Monali Thakur Dum Laga Ke Haisha[t] Hindi [47]
2016
(64th)
Iman Chakraborty Praktan[u] Bengali [48]
2017
(65th)
Shashaa Tirupati Kaatru Veliyidai[v] Tamil [49]
2018
(65th)
Bindhumalini Narayanaswamy Nathicharami[w] Kannada [50]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Shreya Ghoshal received the award in 2009 for her work in both Bengali and Marathi films.[7]
  2. ^ Denotes the year in which the film was censored by the Central Board of Film Certification.
  3. ^ Janaki's work in the song "Sendoora Poove" received a special mention in the citation.
  4. ^ Susheela was awarded for her rendition of the song "Gopaludu."
  5. ^ Swarnalatha was awarded for her rendition of the song "Porale Ponnuthayi."
  6. ^ Chithra was awarded for her rendition of the song "Manamathurai."
  7. ^ Chithra was awarded for her rendition of the song "Payalen Chhun-Mun, Jhhanjhharein Run Jhhun Run Jhhun, Kitna Madhur Hai Ye Milan."
  8. ^ Yagnik was awarded for her rendition of the song "Kuch Kuch Hota Hai."
  9. ^ Dasgupta was awarded for her rendition of the song "Hriday Aamar Prokash Holo (My Heart is Open to the Endless Sky)."
  10. ^ Bhavatharini was awarded for her rendition of the song "Mail Poola Pattu."
  11. ^ Sargam was awarded for her rendition of the song "Paatu Cholli."
  12. ^ Ghoshal was awarded for her rendition of the song "Bairi Piya."
  13. ^ Chithra was awarded for her rendition of the song "Ovvoru Pookalume."
  14. ^ Ghoshal was awarded for her rendition of the song "Apne Aansoo Peene Ke Liye."
  15. ^ Ghoshal was awarded for her rendition of the song "Pherari Mon."
  16. ^ Ghoshal was awarded for her rendition of the song "Jeev Dangla Gungla Rangla."
  17. ^ Ankalikar-Tikekar was awarded for her rendition of the song "Palakein Naa Moon Don."
  18. ^ Shende was awarded for her rendition of the song "Khura Khura."
  19. ^ Unnikrishnan was awarded for her rendition of the song "Azhagu."
  20. ^ Thakur was awarded for her rendition of the song "Moh Moh Ke Dhage."
  21. ^ Chakraborty was awarded for her rendition of the song "Tumi Jaake Bhalo Basho."
  22. ^ Tirupati was awarded for her rendition of the song "Vaan."
  23. ^ Narayanaswamy was awarded for her rendition of the song "Maayavi Manave."

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About National Film Awards". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original on 25 October 2011. Retrieved 31 July 2011.
  2. ^ a b "16th National Awards For Films (1969)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 February 2012.
  3. ^ a b c "20th National Awards For Films (1973)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 November 2013.
  4. ^ a b c "22nd National Awards For Films (1975)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  5. ^ a b "53rd National Awards For Films (2006)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 August 2016.
  6. ^ a b "54th National Awards For Films (2007)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  7. ^ a b "56th National Awards For Films (2009)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 October 2013.
  8. ^ "Biography of K. B. Sundarambal". Sangeetham.com. 3 February 2004. Archived from the original on 17 February 2005.
  9. ^ a b c "17th and 18th National Awards For Films (1970–71)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 October 2012.
  10. ^ Ponthathil, Nisha. "Like Father, Like Daughter". Tehelka. Archived from the original on 19 August 2019.
  11. ^ a b c "30th National Awards For Films (1983)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 February 2014.
  12. ^ "21st National Awards For Films (1974)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 November 2013.
  13. ^ "23rd National Awards For Films (1976)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 February 2014.
  14. ^ "25th National Awards For Films (1978)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 December 2017.
  15. ^ "26th National Awards For Films (1979)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 February 2014.
  16. ^ "Much more than the name of a raga". The New Indian Express. 13 December 2009. Archived from the original on 1 January 2017.
  17. ^ "28th National Awards For Films (1981)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 February 2014.
  18. ^ "29th National Awards For Films (1982)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 December 2013.
  19. ^ "31st National Awards For Films (1984)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 November 2013.
  20. ^ "32nd National Awards For Films (1985)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 September 2013.
  21. ^ a b "36th National Awards For Films (1989)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  22. ^ "34th National Awards For Films (1987)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  23. ^ "35th National Awards For Films (1988)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  24. ^ "37th National Awards For Films (1990)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  25. ^ "38th National Awards For Films (1991)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 November 2013.
  26. ^ "39th National Awards For Films (1992)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 March 2014.
  27. ^ "40th National Awards For Films (1993)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 March 2014.
  28. ^ "41st National Awards For Films (1994)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  29. ^ "42nd National Awards For Films (1995)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 February 2014.
  30. ^ "43rd National Awards For Films (1996)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 December 2013.
  31. ^ "44th National Awards For Films (1990)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  32. ^ "45th National Awards For Films (1998)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  33. ^ "46th National Awards For Films (1999)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 December 2013.
  34. ^ "47th National Awards For Films (2000)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  35. ^ "48th National Awards For Films (2001)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 January 2012.
  36. ^ "49th National Awards For Films (2002)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 December 2013.
  37. ^ "50th National Awards For Films (2003)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  38. ^ "51st National Awards For Films (2004)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  39. ^ "52nd National Awards For Films (2005)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 May 2014.
  40. ^ "55th National Awards For Films (2008)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 October 2013.
  41. ^ "57th National Awards For Films (2010)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 November 2013.
  42. ^ "58th National Awards For Films (2011)". Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 April 2012.
  43. ^ "59th National Awards For Films (2012)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 November 2013.
  44. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced". Press Information Bureau. Archived from the original on 17 August 2019.
  45. ^ "61st National Film Awards for 2013 Announced". Press Information Bureau. Archived from the original on 17 August 2019.
  46. ^ "62nd National Awards For Films (2015)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 April 2013.
  47. ^ "63rd National Awards For Films (2016)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 April 2016.
  48. ^ "64th National Awards For Films (2017)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 June 2017.
  49. ^ "65th National Film Awards: Sridevi Posthumously Awarded Best Actress; Vinod Khanna Honoured With Dada Saheb Phalke Award". CNN-News18. Archived from the original on 14 April 2018.
  50. ^ "66th National Awards For Films (2019)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 August 2019.

External links[edit]