National Film Award for Best Feature Film

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from National Film Award for Best Film)
Jump to: navigation, search
National Film Award for Best Feature Film
Awarded by Directorate of Film Festivals
Type National
Category Indian Cinema
Description
Description Best Feature Film of the year
Medal Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus)
Statistics
Instituted 1953
First awarded 1953
Last awarded 2016
Total awarded 64
Cash award 2,50,000/-
Previous name(s) President's Gold Medal for Best Feature Film
First awardee(s) Shyamchi Aai
Recent awardee(s) Kaasav

The National Award for Best Feature Film is one of the categories in the National Film Awards presented annually by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organisation set up by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India. It is one of several awards presented for feature films and awarded with the Golden Lotus (Swarna Kamal). The award is announced for films produced in a year across the country, in all Indian languages. As of 2016, the award comprises a Swarna Kamal, a certificate, and a cash prize of 2,50,000 and is presented to the producer and the director of the film.

The National Film Awards were established in 1954 to "encourage production of the films of a high aesthetic and technical standard and educational and culture value" and also planned to included awards for regional films.[1] The awards were instituted as "State Awards for Films" but were renamed to "National Film Awards" at the 15th National Film Awards in 1967.[2] As of 2016, the award is one of six Swarna Kamal awards presented for the feature films. The award winning film is included at the annual International Film Festival of India. Only the films made in any Indian language and silent films which are either shot on 35 mm, in a wider gauge, or digital format but released on a film or Video/Digital format and certified by the Central Board of Film Certification as a feature film or featurette are made eligible for the award.[3]

The inaugural award was named as "President's Gold Medal for the All India Best Feature Film" and was awarded to Marathi film, Shyamchi Aai (Shyam's Mother), produced and directed by Pralhad Keshav Atre and is based on Pandurang Sadashiv Sane's Marathi novel of the same name.[1] As of 2016, sixty-four feature films have been awarded which are made in twelve different languages: Bengali (twenty-two), Hindi (fourteen), Malayalam (eleven), Kannada (six), Marathi (five), English (three), Sanskrit and Tamil (two each), Assamese, Beary, Gujarati, and Telugu (one each). At the 26th National Film Awards (1979), no feature film was awarded with the Best Feature film award as the jury headed by filmmaker Chetan Anand scrutinised eighty films but did not consider any film to be "worthy of merit" and "measured up to the standard of excellence set forth by the jury".[4] At the 59th National Film Awards, two feature films shared the award; Marathi film Deool (Temple) and Beary film Byari.[5] Most recently, the award is presented to Marathi film Kaasav (Turtle), produced and directed by filmmaker duo Sumitra Bhave–Sunil Sukthankar.[6] The film depicts the issue of depression among youngsters in relation to the life and nesting cycle of Olive Ridley Sea Turtles.[7]

Satyajit Ray is the most honoured director where six of his films—Pather Panchali (1955), Apur Sansar (1959), Charulata (1964), Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1968), Seemabaddha (1971), and Agantuk (1991)—won the award, followed Buddhadeb Dasgupta (five), Girish Kasaravalli and Mrinal Sen (four each), Shaji N. Karun (three), and Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Tapan Sinha, and G. V. Iyer (two each). As of 2016, the award was presented to the films of ten debutant directors; Satyajit Ray (Pather Panchali, 1955),[8] Adoor Gopalakrishnan (Swayamvaram, 1972),[9] M. T. Vasudevan Nair (Nirmalyam, 1973),[10] Girish Kasaravalli (Ghatashraddha, 1977),[11] Shaji N. Karun (Piravi, 1988),[12] Sandeep Sawant (Shwaas, 2003),[13] Salim Ahamed (Adaminte Makan Abu, 2010),[14] Suveeran (Byari, 2011),[15] Anand Gandhi (Ship of Theseus, 2013),[16] and Chaitanya Tamhane (Court, 2015).[17] Four films awarded with the Best Feature film award were also the Indian submission for the Academy Award for the Best Foreign Language Film; Apur Sansar (1959), Shwaas (2004), Adaminte Makan Abu (2011), and Court (2015).[18] Adi Shankaracharya (1983), the first film made in Sanskrit language,[19] and Byari (2011), the first film made in Beary language,[15] won the award at the 31st National Film Awards and 59th National Film Awards, respectively.

Awards[edit]

Since its inception in 1953, the producer of the film is awarded with the Gold medal and a certificate.[1] A cash prize of 20,000 was introduced at the 5th National Film Awards (1957) and was revised to 40,000 at the 18th National Film Awards (1970),[20] to 50,000 at the 28th National Film Awards (1980),[21] to 2,50,000 at the 54th National Film Awards (2006).[22][23]

From 1953 till 1956,[1][24] the director of the film was awarded with the Gold medal which was later changed in 1957 to a cash prize of 5,000.[22] From 1967 till 1973,[2][25] a plaque was also awarded to the director and cash prize was revised to 10,000 in 1970.[20] At the 22nd National Film Awards (1974),[26] the award for the director was changed to Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus) and a cash prize of 15,000 which was later revised to 20,000 at the 25th National Film Awards (1977).[27] Since 28th National Film Awards (1980),[21] the director is awarded with the Swarna Kamal and a cash prize of 25,000 which was later revised to 50,000 at the 28th National Film Awards (1980),[21] to 2,50,000 at the 54th National Film Awards (2006).[23]

In 1973 and 1974, the lead actor and actress of the film were also awarded. P. J. Antony and Sumithra received a souvenir for Malayalam film Nirmalyam at the 21st National Film Awards (1973).[25] Antony was also awarded the Best Actor, then known as the "Bharat Award for the Best Actor". Utpal Dutt and Gita Sen were awarded with a medallion for Bengali Film Chorus at 22nd National Film Awards (1974).[26]

Winners[edit]

Films in the following languages have won the Best Feature Film award:

Indicates a joint award for that year
List of films, showing the year (award ceremony), language(s), producer(s), director(s) and citation
Year Film(s) Language(s) Producer(s) Director(s) Citation Refs.
1953
(1st)
Shyamchi Aai Marathi Pralhad Keshav Atre Pralhad Keshav Atre  – [1]
1954
(2nd)
Mirza Ghalib Hindi Sohrab Modi Sohrab Modi  – [28]
1955
(3rd)
Pather Panchali Bengali Government of West Bengal Satyajit Ray  – [29]
1956
(4th)
Kabuliwala Bengali Charuchitra Tapan Sinha  – [24]
1957
(5th)
Do Aankhen Barah Haath Hindi V. Shantaram V. Shantaram  – [22]
1958
(6th)
Sagar Sangamey Bengali De Luxe Film Distributors Debaki Bose  – [30]
1959
(7th)
Apur Sansar Bengali Satyajit Ray Productions Satyajit Ray  – [31]
1960
(8th)
Anuradha Hindi  • Hrishikesh Mukherjee
 • L. B. Thakur
Hrishikesh Mukherjee  – [32]
1961
(9th)
Bhagini Nivedita Bengali Aurora Film Corporation Bijoy Bose  – [33]
1962
(10th)
Dada Thakur Bengali Shyamlal Jalan Sudhir Mukherjee  – [34]
1963
(11th)
Shehar Aur Sapna Hindi Naya Sansar Khwaja Ahmad Abbas  – [35]
1964
(12th)
Charulata Bengali R. D. Bansal Satyajit Ray  – [36]
1965
(13th)
Chemmeen Malayalam Babu Ismail Settu Ramu Kariat  – [37]
1966
(14th)
Teesri Kasam Hindi Shailendra Basu Bhattacharya  – [38]
1967
(15th)
Hatey Bazarey Bengali Asim Dutta Tapan Sinha  – [2]
1968
(16th)
Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne Bengali  • Nepal Dutta
 • Asim Dutta
Satyajit Ray  – [39]
1969
(17th)
Bhuvan Shome Hindi Mrinal Sen Productions Mrinal Sen  – [40]
1970
(18th)
Samskara Kannada Pattabhirama Reddy Pattabhirama Reddy  – [20]
1971
(19th)
Seemabaddha Bengali  • Bharat Shamsher
 • Jang Bahadur Rana
Satyajit Ray  – [41]
1972
(20th)
Swayamvaram Malayalam Adoor Gopalakrishnan Adoor Gopalakrishnan  – [42]
1973
(21st)
Nirmalyamdagger Malayalam M. T. Vasudevan Nair M. T. Vasudevan Nair  – [25]
1974
(22nd)
Chorusdagger Bengali Mrinal Sen Productions Mrinal Sen  – [26]
1975
(23rd)
Chomana Dudi Kannada Praja Films B. V. Karanth  – [43]
1976
(24th)
Mrigayaa Hindi Uday Bhaskar International Mrinal Sen  – [44]
1977
(25th)
Ghatashraddha Kannada Sadanand Suvarna Girish Kasaravalli [27]
1978
(26th)
No Award [4]
1979
(27th)
Shodh Hindi Sitakant Misra Biplab Roy Choudhary  – [45]
1980
(28th)
Akaler Shandhaney Bengali D. K. Films Mrinal Sen [21]
1981
(29th)
Dakhal Bengali West Bengal Film Industry Gautam Ghose [46]
1982
(30th)
Chokh Bengali  • Department of Information, Cultural Affairs India
 • Government of West Bengal
Utpalendu Chakrabarty [47]
1983
(31st)
Adi Shankaracharya Sanskrit NFDC G. V. Iyer [48]
1984
(32nd)
Damul Hindi Prakash Jha Productions Prakash Jha  – [49]
1985
(33rd)
Chidambaram Malayalam G. Aravindan G. Aravindan [50]
1986
(34th)
Tabarana Kathe Kannada Girish Kasaravalli Girish Kasaravalli [51]
1987
(35th)
Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai Assamese  • Sailadhar Barua
 • Jahnu Barua
Jahnu Barua [52]
1988
(36th)
Piravi Malayalam Film Folks Shaji N. Karun [53]
1989
(37th)
Bagh Bahadur Bengali Buddhadeb Dasgupta Buddhadeb Dasgupta [54]
1990
(38th)
Marupakkam Tamil NFDC K. S. Sethumadhavan [55]
1991
(39th)
Agantuk Bengali NFDC Satyajit Ray [56]
1992
(40th)
Bhagwat Gita Sanskrit T. Subbarami Reddy G. V. Iyer [57]
1993
(41st)
Charachar Bengali  • Gita Gope
 • Shankar Gope
Buddhadeb Dasgupta [58]
1994
(42nd)
Unishe April Bengali Rituparno Ghosh Rituparno Ghosh [59]
1995
(43rd)
Kathapurushan Malayalam Adoor Gopalakrishnan Adoor Gopalakrishnan [60]
1996
(44th)
Lal Darja Bengali  • Chitrani Lahiri
 • Dulal Roy
Buddhadeb Dasgupta [61]
1997
(45th)
Thaayi Saheba Kannada Jayamala Girish Kasaravalli [62]
1998
(46th)
Samar Hindi  • Shyam Benegal
 • Sahyadri Films
 • NFDC
Shyam Benegal [63]
1999
(47th)
Vanaprastham Malayalam Mohanlal Shaji N. Karun [64]
2000
(48th)
Shantham Malayalam P. V. Gangadharan Jayaraj [65]
2001
(49th)
Dweepa Kannada Soundarya Girish Kasaravalli [66]
2002
(50th)
Mondo Meyer Upakhyan Bengali Arya Bhattacharya Buddhadeb Dasgupta [67]
2003
(51st)
Shwaas Marathi Arun Nalawade Sandeep Sawant [68]
2004
(52nd)
Page 3  • Hindi
 • English
Bobby Pushkarna Madhur Bhandarkar [69]
2005
(53rd)
Kaalpurush Bengali Jhamu Sughand Buddhadeb Dasgupta [70]
2006
(54th)
Pulijanmam Malayalam M. G. Vijay Priyanandanan [23]
2007
(55th)
Kanchivaram Tamil Percept Picture Company Priyadarshan [71]
2008
(56th)
Antaheen Bengali Screenplay Films Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury [72]
2009
(57th)
Kutty Srank Malayalam Reliance Big Pictures Shaji N. Karun [73]
2010
(58th)
Adaminte Makan Abu Malayalam  • Salim Ahamed
 • Ashraf Bedi
Salim Ahamed [74]
2011
(59th)
Deool Marathi Abhijeet Gholap Umesh Vinayak Kulkarni [5]
2011
(59th)
Byari Beary Altaaf Hussain Suveeran [5]
2012
(60th)
Paan Singh Tomar Hindi UTV Software Communications Tigmanshu Dhulia [75]
2013
(61st)
Ship of Theseus  • English
 • Hindi
Recyclewala Films Pvt Ltd Anand Gandhi [76]
2014
(62nd)
Court  • Marathi
 • Gujarati
 • English
 • Hindi
Zoo Entertainment Pvt. Ltd. Chaitanya Tamhane [77]
2015
(63rd)
Baahubali: The Beginning Telugu  • Shobu Yarlagadda
 • Arka Media Works (P) LTD.
S. S. Rajamouli [78]
2016
(64th)
Kaasav Marathi  • Sumitra Bhave
 • Sunil Sukthankar
 • Mohan Agashe
 • Sumitra Bhave
 • Sunil Sukthankar
[6]
dagger Leading actor and Leading actress were awarded with Medallion

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "1st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 12. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c "15th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,9. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 
  3. ^ "Call for entries; 64th National Film Awards for 2016" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 6, 13. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "26th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c "59th National Film Awards for the Year 2011 Announced". Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "64th National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  7. ^ Janjali, Arwa (24 October 2016). "Allow youngsters space and they will explore life on their own". Sakaal Times. Retrieved 4 May 2017. 
  8. ^ Hoffman, Jordan (5 May 2015). "Back on the little road: Satyajit Ray's Pather Panchali returns in all its glory". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 May 2017. 
  9. ^ Venkiteswaran, C. S. (22 November 2012). "Universal and timeless". The Hindu. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  10. ^ Vijayakymar, B. (25 September 2011). "Nirmalyam 1973". The Hindu. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  11. ^ "Ghatashraddha, one of the 20 best movies". The Times of India. Bengaluru. 4 December 2009. Retrieved 12 May 2017. 
  12. ^ "Shaji N. Karun profile @ International Film Festival Rotterdam". International Film Festival Rotterdam. Retrieved 12 May 2017. 
  13. ^ Unnithan, Sandeep (22 November 2004). "Waiting to exhale". India Today. Retrieved 12 May 2017. 
  14. ^ Ittyipe, Minu (5 December 2011). "Kodak Moment: Is Oscar glory for Abu a gossamer dream?". Outlook India. Retrieved 12 May 2017. 
  15. ^ a b Ramavarman, T (8 March 2012). "Theatre experience fuels Suveeran's film journey". The Times of India. Kochi. Retrieved 12 May 2017. 
  16. ^ "Anand Gandhi turns filmmaker with "Theseus's Ship"". The Hindu. 2 April 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  17. ^ Sahadevan, Sonup (23 September 2015). "Court is India's official entry for Oscars, director Chaitanya Tamhane says 'Genuinely surprised'". The Indian Express. New Delhi. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  18. ^ "List of Indian Submissions for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film". Film Federation of India. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  19. ^ Somaaya, Bhawana (8 December 2016). Once Upon a Time in India: A Century of Indian Cinema. Random House Publishers India Pvt. Limited. p. 232. ISBN 978-93-85990-40-3. 
  20. ^ a b c "18th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  21. ^ a b c d "28th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 6. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  22. ^ a b c "5th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,4. Retrieved 2 September 2011. 
  23. ^ a b c "54th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 8–9. Retrieved 24 March 2012. 
  24. ^ a b "4th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2. Retrieved 2 September 2011. 
  25. ^ a b c "21st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,32. Retrieved 29 September 2011. 
  26. ^ a b c "22nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,33. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  27. ^ a b "25th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,44. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  28. ^ "2nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 15. Retrieved 23 August 2011. 
  29. ^ "3rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 6. Retrieved 1 September 2011. 
  30. ^ "6th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. p. 2,4. Retrieved 3 September 2011. 
  31. ^ "7th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,4. Retrieved 4 September 2011. 
  32. ^ "8th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 7 September 2011. 
  33. ^ "9th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 8 September 2011. 
  34. ^ "10th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  35. ^ "11th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 
  36. ^ "12th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 14 September 2011. 
  37. ^ "13th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 1,6. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  38. ^ Gulzar, Govind Nihalani, Saibal Chatterjee (2003). Encyclopaedia of Hindi Cinema. Popular Prakashan. p. 532. ISBN 9788179910665. Retrieved 29 June 2012. 
  39. ^ "16th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2. Retrieved 22 September 2011. 
  40. ^ "17th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 2,6. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  41. ^ "Seemabaddha @ SatyajitRay.org". 
  42. ^ "20th National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. p. 2. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  43. ^ "23rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 1. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  44. ^ "Mrigayaa @ MrinalSen.org". 
  45. ^ Asian recorder, Volume 26. K. K. Thomas at Recorder Press. 1980. Retrieved 29 June 2012. 
  46. ^ "29th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 4. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  47. ^ "30th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 6. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  48. ^ "31st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 6. Retrieved 9 December 2011. 
  49. ^ "32nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. p. 7. Retrieved 6 January 2012. 
  50. ^ "33rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 8–9. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  51. ^ "34th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 10–11. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  52. ^ "35th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 12–13. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  53. ^ "36th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 12–13. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  54. ^ "37th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 12–13. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  55. ^ "38th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 14–15. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  56. ^ "39th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 14–15. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  57. ^ "40th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 14–15. Retrieved 2 March 2012. 
  58. ^ "41st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 12–13. Retrieved 3 March 2012. 
  59. ^ "42nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 5 March 2012. 
  60. ^ "43rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 6 March 2012. 
  61. ^ "44th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  62. ^ "45th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 11 March 2012. 
  63. ^ "46th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  64. ^ "47th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  65. ^ "48th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 22–23. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  66. ^ "49th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 18–19. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  67. ^ "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 18–19. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  68. ^ "51st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 10–11. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  69. ^ "52nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 10–11. Retrieved 28 January 2012. 
  70. ^ "53rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 10–11. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  71. ^ "55th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 14–15. Retrieved 26 March 2012. 
  72. ^ "56th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 14–15. Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  73. ^ "57th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. pp. 48–49. Retrieved 28 March 2012. 
  74. ^ "58th National Film Awards, 2010" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 29 March 2012. 
  75. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 18 March 2013. 
  76. ^ "61st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. 16 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  77. ^ "62nd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  78. ^ "63rd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 28 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016. 

External links[edit]