National Film Award for Best Film on Environment Conservation/Preservation

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National Film Award for Best Film on Environment Conservation/Preservation
Awarded by Directorate of Film Festivals
Type National
Category Indian Cinema
Description
Description The best feature film focusing environmental concerns
Medal Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
Statistics
Instituted 1989
First awarded 1989
Last awarded 2016
Total awarded 19
Cash award 50,000 (US$780)
First awardee(s) Bonani
Last awardee(s) Loktak Lairembee

The National Film Award for Best Film on Environment Conservation/Preservation is one of the categories in the National Film Awards presented annually by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organisation set up by Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India. It is one of several awards presented for feature films and awarded with Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus).

The National Film Awards were established in 1954 to "encourage production of the films of a high aesthetic and technical standard and educational and culture value" and also planned to included awards for regional films.[1][2] In 1989, at the 37th National Film Awards the new category of award for Best Film on Environment Conservation/Preservation was introduced for the Rajat Kamal and awarded annually for films produced in the year across the country, in all Indian languages. As of 2016 since its inception, the award has been present only nineteen times to unique films. It has been presented for films in eight languages with the highest being six in Malayalam, followed by five in Kannada, two each in Assamese and Odia, and one each in Bodo, Manipuri, Marathi, and Tamil. It was not presented on nine occasion in 1990 (38th ceremony),[3] 1991 (39th ceremony),[4] 1996 (44th ceremony),[5] 2001 (49th ceremony),[6] 2002 (50th ceremony),[7] 2006 (54th ceremony),[8] 2007 (55th ceremony),[9] 2009 (57th ceremony),[10] and 2011 (59th ceremony).[11]

The inaugural award was conferred upon the production house M/s Purbanchal Film Co-operative Society Ltd. (Rajat Kamal and 30,000) and director Jahnu Barua (Rajat Kamal and 15,000) for their Assamese film Bonani for the story of a lone forest officer fighting the illegal timber mafia and protecting rights of uneducated tribals.[12] Kannada film director P. Sheshadri received the award in 2005 for his film Thutturi which was produced by Jayamala Ramchandra.[13] He again won the award in 2010 for the film Bettada Jeeva produced by Basanta Kumar Patil.[14] Malayalam film director Dr. Biju went on to receive the award in 2013 for his film Perariyathavar produced by Ambalakkara Global Films and again in 2015 for the film Valiya Chirakulla Pakshikal produced by A. K. Pillai.[15][16] The most recent recipient of the award has been the Manipuri film Loktak Lairembee (meaning "Lady of the lake") which is directed as well as produced by Haobam Paban Kumar.[17] The film is about fishermen of the Loktak Lake, the largest freshwater lake in Northeast India, situated in the state of Manipur, who have been rendered homeless since their floating huts were destroyed for protecting the ecosystem. The film is Kumar's debut feature film.[18]

Winners[edit]

The award includes 'Rajat Kamal' (Silver Lotus) and cash prize to the producers and director each. The first award in 1989 had a monetary association of 30,000 to the producers and 15,000 to the directors.[12] In 1995 at the 43rd award ceremony the Bodo language film Rape in the Virgin Forest was honoured and the cash prices were revised to 30,000 each presented to Jwngdao Bodosa who had both produced and directed the film about the problems of deforestation and struggles of tribal people.[19] The monetary association was again revised to 1,50,000 to both the producers and directors in 2008 at the 56th awarding ceremony where producer Akshay Parija and director Prashanta Nanda's Odia language film Jianta Bhoota (meaning "The Living Ghost") was the winner for its portrayal of lives of Dongria Kondh tribal people residing in the Niyamgiri hills range of Odisha.[8][20] The cash remunerations have remained same as of 2016 since then.[17]

Following are the award winners over the years:

List of films, showing the year (award ceremony), language(s), producer(s), director(s) and citation
Year Film(s) Language(s) Producer(s) Director(s) Citation Refs.
1989
(37th)
Bonani Assamese Purbanchal Film Jahnu Barua [12]
1990
(38th)
No Award [3]
1991
(39th)
No Award [4]
1992
(40th)
Cheluvi Kannada Sadir Media Girish Karnad [21]
1993
(41st)
Devara Kadu Kannada Pattabhirami Reddy Productions Pattabhirami Reddy Tikkavarapu [22]
1994
(42nd)
Nirbachana Oriya  • NFDC
 • Doordarshan
Biplab Ray Chowdhury [23]
1995
(43rd)
Rape in the Virgin Forest (Hagramayao Jinahari) Bodo Jwngdao Bodosa Jwngdao Bodosa [19]
1996
(44th)
No Award [5]
1997
(45th)
Bhoomi Geetha Kannada R. Mahadev Gowda Kesari Harvoo [24]
1998
(46th)
Malli Tamil N'CYP Santosh Sivan [25]
1999
(47th)
Jalamarmaram Malayalam  • Latha Kurien Rajeev
 • Radhika Suresh Gopi
T. K. Rajeev Kumar [26]
2000
(48th)
Oru Cheru Punchiri Malayalam Jisha John M. T. Vasudevan Nair [27]
2001
(49th)
No Award [6]
2002
(50th)
No Award [7]
2003
(51st)
Juye Poora Xoon Assamese Sanjib Sabhapandit Sanjib Sabhapandit [28]
2004
(52nd)
Devrai Marathi Y. N. Oak  • Sumitra Bhave
 • Sunil Sukthankar
[29]
2005
(53rd)
Thutturi Kannada Jaimala Ramchandra P. Sheshadri [13]
2006
(54th)
No Award [8]
2007
(55th)
No Award [9]
2008
(56th)
Jianta Bhoota Odia Akshay Kumar Parija Prashanta Nanda [30]
2009
(57th)
No Award [10]
2010
(58th)
Bettada Jeeva Kannada Basanta Kumar Patil P. Sheshadri [14]
2011
(59th)
No Award [11]
2012
(60th)
Black Forest Malayalam Joshy Mathew Baby Mathew Somatheeram [31]
2013
(61st)
Perariyathavar Malayalam Ambalakkara Global Films Dr. Biju [15]
2014
(62nd)
Ottaal Malayalam Director Cutz Film Company Jayaraj [32]
2015
(63rd)
Valiya Chirakulla Pakshikal Malayalam A. K. Pillai Dr. Biju [16]
2016
(64th)
Loktak Lairembee Manipuri Haobam Paban Kumar Haobam Paban Kumar [17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1st National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  2. ^ "1st National Film Awards (PDF)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  3. ^ a b "38th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "39th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 27 February 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "44th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "49th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c "54th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 24 March 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "55th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 26 March 2012. 
  10. ^ a b "57th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 28 March 2012. 
  11. ^ a b "59th National Film Awards for the Year 2011 Announced". Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c "37th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 29 January 2012. 
  13. ^ a b "53rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 19 March 2012. 
  14. ^ a b "58th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 29 March 2012. 
  15. ^ a b "61st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. 16 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  16. ^ a b "63rd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 28 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016. 
  17. ^ a b c "64th National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  18. ^ Khelen Thokchom (8 April 2017). "Manipur film bags national award, Loktak Lairembee focuses on the plight of displaced lake-dwellers". Telegraph India. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  19. ^ a b "43rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 6 March 2012. 
  20. ^ "'Jianta Bhoota' bags national film award". The Hindu. 26 January 2010. Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  21. ^ "40th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 2 March 2012. 
  22. ^ "41st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 3 March 2012. 
  23. ^ "42nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 5 March 2012. 
  24. ^ "45th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 11 March 2012. 
  25. ^ "46th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 12 March 2012. 
  26. ^ "47th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  27. ^ "48th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 
  28. ^ "51st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  29. ^ "52nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 28 January 2012. 
  30. ^ "56th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  31. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 18 March 2013. 
  32. ^ "62nd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 

External links[edit]