National Fire Protection Association

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National Fire Protection Association
NFPA logo.svg
AbbreviationNFPA
Founded1896; 124 years ago (1896)[1]
HeadquartersQuincy, Massachusetts, US
Area served
Worldwide
MethodIndustry standards, publications, conferences
Members
50,000
President and CEO
Jim Pauley[2]
Volunteers
9,000
Websitenfpa.org

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is an international nonprofit organization devoted to eliminating death, injury, property and economic loss due to fire, electrical and related hazards.[2][3] In 2018, the NFPA claims to have 50,000 members and 9,000 volunteers working with the organization through its 250 technical committees.[1][4]

The association's official mascot Sparky the Fire Dog promotes fire safety education for children.[5]

Codes and standards[edit]

The association's codes and standards include:[6]

  • NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers
  • NFPA 12, Standard on Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems
  • NFPA 12A, Standard on Halon 1301 Fire Extinguishing Systems
  • NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems
  • NFPA 13D, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One- and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes
  • NFPA 13R, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in Low-Rise Residential Occupancies
  • NFPA 14, Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems
  • NFPA 15, Standard for Water Spray Fixed Systems for Fire Protection
  • NFPA 17, Standard for Dry Chemical Extinguishing Systems
  • NFPA 17A, Standard for Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems
  • NFPA 20, Standard for the Installation of Stationary Pumps for Fire Protection
  • NFPA 24, Standard for the Installation of Private Fire Service Mains and Their Appurtenances
  • NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems
  • NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code
  • NFPA 70, National Electrical Code
  • NFPA 70A, National Electrical Code Requirements for One and Two Family Dwellings
  • NFPA 70B, Recommended Practice for Electrical Equipment Maintenance
  • NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace
  • NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code
  • NFPA 77, Recommended Practice on Static Electricity
  • NFPA 80, Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives
  • NFPA 101, Life Safety Code
  • NFPA 160, Standard for the Use of Flame Effects Before an Audience
  • NFPA 241, Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alteration, and Demolition Operations
  • NFPA 704, Standard System for the Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response
  • NFPA 710, Standard for Fire Safety and Emergency Symbols
  • NFPA 921, Guide for Fire and Explosion Investigations
  • NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications
  • NFPA 1006, Core competencies for technical rescue
  • NFPA 1061, Standard for Public Safety Telecommunications Personnel Professional Qualifications
  • NFPA 1123, Code for Fireworks Display
  • NFPA 1126, Standard for the Use of Pyrotechnics before a Proximate Audience
  • NFPA 1221, Standard for the Installation, Maintenance, and Use of Emergency Services Communications Systems
  • NFPA 1225, Standards for Emergency Services Communications
  • NFPA 1600, Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity/Continuity of Operations Programs
  • NFPA 1670, Standard on Operations and Training for Technical Search and Rescue Incidents
  • NFPA 1901, Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus
  • NFPA 2001, Standard on Clean Agent Fire Extinguishing Systems

Mascot[edit]

Sparky the Fire Dog

Sparky the Fire Dog is the official mascot of the National Fire Protection Association. Created in 1951 to promote fire safety education for children,[7][5] he is a Dalmatian dressed in firefighting gear.

A children's book written about Sparky by Don Hoffman was published in 2011. He serves as the spokesdog for Fire Prevention Week each October in the United States and Canada.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "NFPA overview". National Fire Protection Association. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "NFPA Leadership". National Fire Protection Association. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  3. ^ "National Fire Protection Association - NFPA". Healthfinder.gov. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  4. ^ "About NFPA". National Fire Protection Association. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c "History of Fire Safety Mascots in America". Fire & Life Safety America. Retrieved July 12, 2018.
  6. ^ "List of NFPA Codes and Standards". National Fire Protection Association. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  7. ^ "Sparky". Retrieved July 12, 2018.

External links[edit]