National Heritage Fellowship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from National Heritage Fellowships)
Jump to: navigation, search

The National Heritage Fellowship is a lifetime honor presented to master folk and traditional artists by the National Endowment for the Arts. Similar to Japan's Living National Treasure award, the Fellowship is the United States' highest honor in the folk and traditional arts. It is a one-time only award and fellows must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States. The program was founded in 1982 by Bess Lomax Hawes, the first director of the Folk and Traditional Arts Program at the NEA.[1] Each year, fellowships are presented to between ten and fifteen artists or groups at a White House ceremony in Washington, D.C.

A two-volume biographical dictionary of the award winners from the first 20 years was published in 2001.[2] A young readers book featuring five of the National Heritage Fellows entitled Extraordinary Ordinary People: Five American Masters of Traditional Arts was published in 2006.[3]

Winners[edit]

Awardees have included Native American basket weavers, African American blues musicians, traditional fiddlers, Mexican American accordionists, and all manner of traditional artisans and performers of numerous ethnic backgrounds.


1982 | 1983 | 1984 | 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990

1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000

2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010

2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017

National Heritage Fellowship winners include:

1982[edit]

1983[edit]

1984[edit]

1985[edit]

1986[edit]

1987[edit]

1988[edit]

1989[edit]

1990[edit]

1991[edit]

1992[edit]

1993[edit]

1994[edit]

1995[edit]

1996[edit]

1997[edit]

1998[edit]

1999[edit]

2000[edit]

2001[edit]

2002[edit]

2003[edit]

2004[edit]

2005[edit]

2006[edit]

2007[edit]

2008[edit]

2009[edit]

2010[edit]

2011[edit]

2012[edit]

2013[edit]

2014[edit]

2015[edit]

2016[edit]

2017[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sullivan, Patricia (December 2, 2009). "Bess Lomax Hawes, 88; folklorist, performer, NEA official". Washington Post. Retrieved 19 October 2017. 
  2. ^ Govenar, Alan (2001). Masters of Traditional Arts: A Biographical Dictionary. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio. ISBN 1576072401. Retrieved 11 February 2014. 
  3. ^ Govenar, Alan B. (2006). Extraordinary Ordinary People: Five American Masters of Traditional Arts. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press. ISBN 9780763620479. Retrieved 11 February 2014. 
  4. ^ 1989 NEA National Heritage Fellow: Chesley Goseyun Wilson, National Endowment for the Arts (USA)
  5. ^ Colker, David (2014-10-04). "Musician Nati Cano dies at 81; leader of Mariachi los Camperos". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2014-10-25. 
  6. ^ "Jerry Brown". www.arts.gov. National Endowment for the Arts. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  7. ^ Broadfoot, Jan. "Twentieth-Century Tar Heels," Broadfoot's of Wendell, 2004.
  8. ^ "Fatima Kuinova". www.arts.gov. National Endowment for the Arts. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 
  9. ^ Jason Ankeny. "Elder Roma Wilson". Allmusic.com. Retrieved October 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Lifetime Honors: Bruce Caesar." National Endowment for the Arts. (retrieved 6 Aug 2011)
  11. ^ "News | NEA". Nea.gov. 2014-02-05. Retrieved 2014-02-11. 
  12. ^ "Big Joe Duskin; Bluesman who flourished in later life - obituary by Tony Russell". London: Guardian.co.uk. June 19, 2007. Retrieved November 25, 2009. 
  13. ^ "About Ka'upena Wong". Coconutinfo.com. 2013-02-07. Retrieved 2014-02-11. 
  14. ^ "National Endowment for the Arts Statement on the Death of Clarissa Rizal, 2016 National Heritage Fellow". National Endowment for the Arts. NEA. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 

External links[edit]