National Historic Chemical Landmarks

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Plaque noting National Historic Chemical Landmark status at the Joseph Priestley House.

The National Historic Chemical Landmarks program was launched by the American Chemical Society in 1992 to recognize significant achievements in the history of chemistry and related professions. The program celebrates the centrality of chemistry. The designation of such generative achievements in the history of chemistry demonstrates how chemists have benefited society by fulfilling the ACS vision: Improving people's lives through the transforming power of chemistry. The program occasionally designates International Historic Chemical Landmarks to commemorate "chemists and chemistry from around the world that have had a major impact in the United States".[1]

List of landmarks[edit]

1993[edit]

1994[edit]

The Joseph Priestley House in Northumberland, Pennsylvania.

1995[edit]

1996[edit]

1997[edit]

1998[edit]

1999[edit]

2000[edit]

2001[edit]

2002[edit]

2003[edit]

2004[edit]

2005[edit]

2006[edit]

2007[edit]

2008[edit]

2009[edit]

2010[edit]

2011[edit]

2012[edit]

2013[edit]

2014[edit]

2015[edit]

2016[edit]

2017[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "International and Local Section Landmarks". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Bakelite: The World's First Synthetic Plastic". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  3. ^ "Chandler Laboratory at Lehigh University". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  4. ^ "Joseph Priestley, Discoverer of Oxygen". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  5. ^ "Edward W. Morley and the Atomic Weight of Oxygen". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  6. ^ a b "Founadtions of Polymer Science: Wallace Carothers and the Development of Nylon". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  7. ^ "Acetyl Chemicals from Coal Gasification". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  8. ^ "Universal Oil Products (UOP) Riverside Laboratory". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  9. ^ "Williams-Miles History of Chemistry Collection at Harding University". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  10. ^ "Houdry Process for Catalytic Cracking". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  11. ^ "Modern Water-based Paint: Kem-Tone Wall Finish". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  12. ^ "Sohio Acrylonitrile Process". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  13. ^ "Commercialization of Radiation Chemistry". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  14. ^ "Electrolytic Production of Bromine". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  15. ^ "Hall Process: Production and Commercialization of Aluminum". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  16. ^ "Gilman Hall at the University of California, Berkeley". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  17. ^ "Tagamet: Discovery of Histamine H2-receptor Antagonists". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  18. ^ "Discovery of the Commercial Processes for Making Calcium Carbide and Acetylene". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  19. ^ "U.S. Synthetic Rubber Program". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  20. ^ "Havemeyer Hall at Columbia University". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  21. ^ "Fluid Bed Reactor". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  22. ^ "C.V. Raman: The Raman Effect". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  23. ^ "Foundations of Polymer Science: Hermann Staudinger and Macromolecules". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  24. ^ "Percy Julian: Synthesis of Physostigmine". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  25. ^ "Antoine Laurent Lavoisier: The Chemical Revolution". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  26. ^ "Marker Degradation: Russell Marker and Progesterone Synthesis". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  27. ^ "Separation of Rare Earth Elements by Charles James". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  28. ^ "Polypropylene and High-density Polyethlyene". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  29. ^ "Discovery and Development of Penicillin". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  30. ^ "Smith Memorial Collection at the University of Pennsylvania". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  31. ^ "Discovery of Helium in Natural Gas". American Chemical Society. National Historic Chemical Landmarks. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  32. ^ "Moses Gomberg and Organic Free Radicals". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  33. ^ "Discovery of Transuranium Elements at Berkely Lab". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  34. ^ "Joseph Priestley: Discoverer of Oxygen (Bowood House)". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  35. ^ "Nucleic Acid and Protein Research at Rockefeller University". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  36. ^ "Charles Herty and the Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  37. ^ "Hall Process: Production and Commercialization of Aluminum". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  38. ^ "John W. Draper and the Founding of the American Chemical Society". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  39. ^ "National Institute of Standards and Technology". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  40. ^ "Norbert Rillieux and a Revolution in Sugar Processing". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  41. ^ "Discovery of Vitamin C by Albert Szent-Györgyi". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  42. ^ "Noyes Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  43. ^ "Alice Hamilton and the Development of Occupational Medicine". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  44. ^ "Frozen Foods Research: Time-Temperature Tolerance Studies". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2017-11-11.
  45. ^ "Discovery of Camptothecin and Taxol". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  46. ^ "Foundations of Polymer Science: Herman Mark and the Polymer Research Institute". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-12. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  47. ^ "High Performance Carbon Fibers". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2016-08-24.
  48. ^ "Development of the Beckman pH Meter". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-12. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  49. ^ "Cotton Products Research". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  50. ^ "Carl and Gerty Cori and Carbohydrate Metabolism". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-12. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  51. ^ "George Washington Carver: Chemist, Teacher, Symbol". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  52. ^ "Selman Waksman and Antibiotics". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2015-09-04.
  53. ^ "Columbia Dry Cell Battery". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2016-05-15. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  54. ^ "Neil Bartlett and Reactive Noble Gases". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-12. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  55. ^ "Development of Baking Powder by Eben Horsford". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-01-12. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  56. ^ "Tide Synthetic Detergent". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  57. ^ "Food Dehydration Technology". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-02-23. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  58. ^ "Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS)". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2012-07-12. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  59. ^ "Scotch Transparent Tape". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  60. ^ "Chemistry at Jamestown". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  61. ^ "Production and Distribution of Radioisotopes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  62. ^ "Penicillin Production through Deep-tank Fermentation". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  63. ^ "Acrylic Emulsion Technology". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  64. ^ "Development of the Pennsylvania Oil Industry". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2013-02-23. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  65. ^ "Deciphering the Genetic Code". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  66. ^ "Development of Diagnostic Test Strips". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  67. ^ "Discovery of Fullerenes". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  68. ^ "NMR and MRI: Applications in Chemistry and Medicine". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  69. ^ "DayGlo Fluorescent Pigments". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  70. ^ "Legacy of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2012-10-28.
  71. ^ "Mellon Institute of Industrial Research". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-11-06.
  72. ^ "R. B. Wetherill Laboratory of Chemistry". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-11-06.
  73. ^ "Flavor Chemistry Research USDA ARS Western Regional Research Center". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2013-11-06.
  74. ^ "Thomas Edison, Chemist". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2014-02-21.
  75. ^ "I. M. Kolthoff and Modern Analytical Chemistry". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2014-02-21.
  76. ^ "Rachel Holloway Lloyd, Pioneer American Woman in Chemistry". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2014-02-21.
  77. ^ "The Keeling Curve: Studies of Atmospheric CO2". National Historic Chemical Landmarks. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2014-02-21.
  78. ^ "Kelly Pneumatic Iron Process". Kelly Pneumatic Iron Process. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 11 Aug 2015.
  79. ^ "National Historic Chemical Landmarks". Edwin Land and Instant Photography. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 11 Aug 2015.
  80. ^ "National Historic Chemical Landmarks". Discovery and Isolation of Phytochrome. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 11 Aug 2015.
  81. ^ "Radiocarbon Dating - American Chemical Society". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2016-10-09.
  82. ^ "The Vitamin B Complex". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 4 June 2018.
  83. ^ "Discovery of Ivermectin". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 4 June 2018.
  84. ^ "Infrared Spectrometer and the Exploration of Mars". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 4 June 2018.
  85. ^ "Chlorofluorocarbons and Ozone Depletion". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 4 June 2018.

External links[edit]