National Historic Site (United States)

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Salem Maritime National Historic Site was the first National Historic Site to be established in the U.S.

National Historic Site (NHS) is a designation for an officially recognized area of national historic significance in the United States. An NHS usually contains a single historical feature directly associated with its subject. The National Historical Park (NHP) is an area that generally extends beyond single properties or buildings, and its resources include a mix of historic and later structures and sometimes significant natural features.

As of 2022, there are 62 NHPs and 83 NHSs. Most NHPs and NHSs are managed by the National Park Service (NPS). Some federally designated sites are owned by local authorities or privately owned, but are authorized to request assistance from the NPS as affiliated areas. One property managed by the U.S. Forest Service: Grey Towers National Historic Site.[1]

As of October 15, 1966, all historic areas, including NHPs and NHSs, in the NPS are automatically listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). There are also about 90,000 NRHP sites, the large majority of which are neither owned nor managed by the NPS. Of these, about 2,500[2] have been designated at the highest status as National Historic Landmark (NHL) sites.

National Historic Sites[edit]

National Historic Sites are generally federally owned and administered properties, though some remain under private or local government ownership. There are currently 83 NHSs, of which 73 are official NPS units, 9 are NPS affiliated areas, and one managed by the U.S. Forest Service.

Derived from the Historic Sites Act of 1935, a number of NHSs were established by United States Secretaries of the Interior, but most have been authorized by acts of Congress. In 1937, the first NHS was created in Salem, Massachusetts, in order to preserve and interpret the maritime history of New England and the United States.

National historic sites
Name Image Location Area[3] Description
Allegheny Portage Railroad Allegheny Portage Railroad through the winter (16099300555).jpg Pennsylvania 1,284.27 acres (5.1973 km2) The Allegheny Portage Railroad was the first railroad through the Allegheny Mountains in central Pennsylvania that connected the Midwestern United States to the Eastern seaboard, used as a portage railway to haul river boats and barges over the divide between the Ohio and the Susquehanna Rivers.[4]
Andersonville Georgia 515.61 acres (2.0866 km2) The Andersonville National Historic Site, a former Confederate prisoner-of-war camp, is located near Andersonville, Georgia. The prison operated during the final fourteen months of the American Civil War, February 1864 - April 1865. It was overcrowded, with an inadequate water supply, inadequate food, and unsanitary conditions. Of the roughly 45,000 Union prisoners held there during the war, nearly 13,000 died. [5]
Andrew Johnson Andrew-Johnson-Home.jpg Tennessee 16.68 acres (0.0675 km2) [6]
Bent's Old Fort Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site, La Junta, Colorado, September 7, 2011 (Pentax K10D) (29241849547).jpg Colorado 798.54 acres (3.2316 km2) [7]
Boston African American USA-54th Regiment Memorial0.jpg Massachusetts 0.59 acres (0.0024 km2) The Beacon Hill neighborhood was home to most of Boston's Black population before the Civil War, much of whom were slaves who escaped via the Underground Railroad. Sites on the Black Heritage Trail include the 1806 African Meeting House, the oldest standing black church in the United States; the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial; schools; and homes of several abolitionists.[8]
Carl Sandburg Home Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site (7fea4485-5fbf-4db9-b9d7-c0a961b72380).jpg North Carolina 268.49 acres (1.0865 km2) [9]
Carter G. Woodson Home Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site - 2017.jpg Washington, D.C. 0.15 acres (0.00061 km2) Carter G. Woodson, the pioneering historian, author, and journalist who founded Black History Month, lived in this three-story rowhouse from 1922 until his death in 1950. There he operated the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History and published the published the Negro History Bulletin and the Journal of Negro History.[10]
Charles Pinckney Charles Pinckney National Historic Site (f93f39a5-dab4-47f3-a698-feead1087f84).jpg South Carolina 28.45 acres (0.1151 km2) [11]
Chicago Portage
(affiliated area)
Statue of Father Marquette and Louis Joliet, Chicago Portage National Historic Site, Lyons, Illinois (9181922928).jpg Illinois 91.2 acres (0.369 km2)
Chimney Rock
(affiliated area)
Chimney Rock NE.jpg Nebraska 83 acres (0.34 km2) Chimney Rock is a prominent geological rock formation in western Nebraska that served as a landmark along the Oregon Trail, the California Trail, and the Mormon Trail during the mid-19th century. [12]
Christiansted Custom House 03.jpg U.S. Virgin Islands 27.15 acres (0.1099 km2) [13]
Clara Barton Clara Barton's Home, Glen Echo, Maryland LCCN2011631520.tif Maryland 8.59 acres (0.0348 km2) [14]
Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site (fc2ba22a-fa45-4727-b202-d94718c7e36b).jpg Pennsylvania 0.52 acres (0.0021 km2) [15]
Eisenhower Eisenhower Farm Gettysburg.tif Pennsylvania 690.46 acres (2.7942 km2) [16]
Eleanor Roosevelt Stone Cottage Val-Kill NY1.jpg New York 180.50 acres (0.7305 km2) [17]
Eugene O'Neill Tao House (9242981442).jpg California 13.19 acres (0.0534 km2) [18]
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis
(affiliated area)
Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site (a232db38-06e3-430c-a00d-c0a8e0f63710).jpg Ohio [19]
First Ladies First Ladies National Historic Site main entrance at the 1895 City National Bank Building.JPG Ohio 0.46 acres (0.0019 km2) [20]
Ford's Theatre Balcony of Ford's Theatre, with view of the private box in which Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, Washington, D.C LCCN2011633249.tif Washington, D.C. 0.30 acres (0.0012 km2) President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on April 14, 1865 while watching a performance of Our American Cousin at Ford's Theatre. He was brought across the street to the Petersen House where he died the next morning. The theatre continues to produce live plays and has a museum of artifacts related to Lincoln, and the Petersen House, the first historic home purchased by the U.S. government, is furnished as it was the night Lincoln died.[21]
Fort Bowie FortBowieSiteAZ2009.jpg Arizona 999.45 acres (4.0446 km2) [22]
Fort Davis Fort Davis National Historic Site, Texas 04.JPG Texas 523.00 acres (2.1165 km2) [23]
Fort Laramie Fort Laramie NHS WY3.jpg Wyoming 873.11 acres (3.5334 km2) [24]
Fort Larned Santa Fe Trail Wagon at the Fort Larned Historic Site.jpg Kansas 718.39 acres (2.9072 km2) [25]
Fort Point Golden Gate Bridge (San Francisco).jpg California 29.00 acres (0.1174 km2) Fort Point was built in the 1850s to defend San Francisco Bay. It never saw battle as the only such fort on the West Coast, but the masonry structure was preserved when the Golden Gate Bridge was built directly over it in the 1930s.[26]
Fort Raleigh Fort Raleigh National Historic Site earthworks 2 - Sarah Stierch.jpg North Carolina 515.73 acres (2.0871 km2) [27]
Fort Scott Fortscottks.JPG Kansas 20.11 acres (0.0814 km2) [28]
Fort Smith Barracks of Fort Smith.jpg Arkansas, Oklahoma 75.00 acres (0.3035 km2) [29]
Fort Union Trading Post Ft. Union Trading Post National Historic Site.jpg Montana, North Dakota 440.14 acres (1.7812 km2) [30]
Fort Vancouver Artillery Barracks.jpg Washington, Oregon 206.72 acres (0.8366 km2) The Hudson's Bay Company had their northwest headquarters at Fort Vancouver, where they operated the fur trade and oversaw vast territory in the 1820s to 1840s. A reconstructed fort shows life in the Columbia District. It is adjacent to the Pearson Air Museum and the U.S. Army's former Vancouver Barracks, and the home of HBC superintendent John McLoughlin is in Oregon City.[31]
Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass House.jpg Washington, D.C. 8.57 acres (0.0347 km2) Frederick Douglass was a prominent abolitionist who gave speeches and wrote books about his time enslaved and social reform. He spent the last 17 years of his life at this home, called Cedar Hill, in the Anacostia neighborhood, where he wrote an autobiography and was a member of D.C. society. The house is restored with many of Douglass's original belongings.[32]
Frederick Law Olmsted BrooklineMA OlmstedHouse.jpg Massachusetts 7.21 acres (0.0292 km2) [33]
Friendship Hill Albertfriendship.jpg Pennsylvania 674.56 acres (2.7298 km2) [34]
Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church
(affiliated area)
Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Episcopal Church 916 S Swanson St Philadelphia PA (DSC 3836).jpg Pennsylvania 3.7 acres (0.015 km2) [35]
Grant–Kohrs Ranch GRKO Long Horn.jpg Montana 1,618.43 acres (6.5496 km2) [36]
Grey Towers Grey Towers National Historic Site The Letter Box.jpg Pennsylvania 102 acres (0.41 km2) [37]
Hampton Hampton NHS SW elevation.jpg Maryland 62.04 acres (0.2511 km2) [38]
Harry S. Truman Trumanhist.JPG Missouri 12.59 acres (0.0509 km2) [39]
Herbert Hoover Herbert Hoover National Historical Site HEHO3381.jpg Iowa 186.80 acres (0.7560 km2) [40]
Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt East facade of the President's house, Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site (edited).jpg New York 838.43 acres (3.3930 km2) [41]
Honouliuli Honouliuli Internment Camp.jpg Hawaii 154.46 acres (0.6251 km2) [42]
Hopewell Furnace The iron furnace - panoramio.jpg Pennsylvania 848.06 acres (3.4320 km2) [43]
Hubbell Trading Post Hubbell Trading Post 01.jpg Arizona 160.09 acres (0.6479 km2) [44]
James A. Garfield House front - James A Garfield National Historic Site (29552083810).jpg Ohio 7.82 acres (0.0316 km2) [45]
Jamestown
(affiliated area)
1639 Jamestown Church (2883847775).jpg Virginia
John Fitzgerald Kennedy John F. Kennedy home, Brookline, Massachusetts LCCN2011630152.tif Massachusetts 0.09 acres (0.00036 km2) [46]
John Muir California Historical Landmark 312+Muir National Historic Site MM 3534--John Muir3.tif California 344.14 acres (1.3927 km2) [47]
Kate Mullany
(affiliated area)
Kate Mullany House 30May2008.jpg New York
Knife River Indian Villages Earthlodge (04855a71-2de7-4be0-b721-a3b65078a18b).jpg North Dakota 1,751.00 acres (7.0860 km2) [48]
Lincoln Home Lincoln Home 1.jpg Illinois 12.24 acres (0.0495 km2) [49]
Little Rock Central High School Desegregation landmark, Little Rock Central High School, Little Rock, Arkansas LCCN2011631075 (cropped).tif Arkansas 28.22 acres (0.1142 km2) [50]
Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters Longfellow House, Cambridge.jpg Massachusetts 1.98 acres (0.0080 km2) [51]
Lower East Side Tenement
(affiliated area)
The Tenement Museum (51624759160).jpg New York [52]
Maggie L. Walker Maggie L. Walker House NPS.jpg Virginia 1.29 acres (0.0052 km2) [53]
Manzanar Manzanar September 2016 008.jpg California 813.81 acres (3.2934 km2) [54]
Martin Van Buren Lindenwald NY1.jpg New York 284.93 acres (1.1531 km2) [55]
Mary McLeod Bethune Council House Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, DC.jpg Washington, D.C. 0.07 acres (0.00028 km2) [56]
Minidoka Miin block 22.jpg Idaho 396.30 acres (1.6038 km2) The Minidoka War Relocation Center was the first of ten camps where Japanese Americans were imprisoned during World War II. More than 13,000 incarcerees stayed here at hastily built barracks in the high desert, working on camp construction, at its farm, or on the Anderson Ranch Dam. The Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial, commemorating where 276 residents were removed from their homes, is a unit of Minidoka NHS.[57]
Minuteman Missile Minuteman Missile National Historic Site visitor center, South Dakota.jpg South Dakota 43.80 acres (0.1773 km2) [58]
Nicodemus Township Hall P7260403.JPG Kansas 4.39 acres (0.0178 km2) [59]
Ninety Six South Carolina 1,021.94 acres (4.1356 km2) [60]
Pennsylvania Avenue Federal Triangle - facing east.jpg Washington, D.C. 17.61 acres (0.0713 km2) The neighborhood around Pennsylvania Avenue between the White House and the United States Capitol has many historically and architecturally significant buildings and sites, including the Old Post Office, Freedom Plaza, United States Navy Memorial, National World War I Memorial, Federal Triangle, John Marshall Park, and Judiciary Square.[61]
President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home Birthplace of Bill Clinton (37862197466).jpg Arkansas 0.68 acres (0.0028 km2) [62]
Puʻukoholā Heiau Pu'ukohola Heiau Historic Site, Waimea - panoramio (1).jpg Hawaii 86.24 acres (0.3490 km2) This stone temple was built by Kamehameha the Great in 1791 following a prophecy that would allow him to conquer all of the Hawaiian islands. At this site his cousin Keōua was slain, ending the civil war on Hawaiʻi. John Young governed the island from its first European-style house nearby while Kamehameha unified Hawaii.[63]
Sagamore Hill SagamoreHill.JPG New York 83.02 acres (0.3360 km2) [64]
Saint Paul's Church Saint Paul's Church National Historic Site.jpg New York 6.13 acres (0.0248 km2) [65]
Salem Maritime Salem Maritime Historic Site 5.JPG Massachusetts 9.02 acres (0.0365 km2) [66]
San Juan USA-2016-Puerto Rico-San Juan-Castillo San Felipe del Morro (and lighthouse) 03.jpg Puerto Rico 75.13 acres (0.3040 km2) [67]
Sand Creek Massacre High Plains P5310706.jpg Colorado 12,583.34 acres (50.9230 km2) [68]
Saugus Iron Works Saugus Iron Works house.jpg Massachusetts 8.51 acres (0.0344 km2) [69]
Springfield Armory Springfield Armory National Historic Site.jpg Massachusetts 54.93 acres (0.2223 km2) [70]
Steamtown Steamtown NHS-27527-5.jpg Pennsylvania 62.48 acres (0.2528 km2) [71]
Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace Roosevelt 3.jpg New York 0.11 acres (0.00045 km2) President Theodore Roosevelt was born at the original townhouse at this site in 1858 and lived there until 1872. Although it was demolished in 1916, the brownstone was reconstructed a few years later after his death, restored with original and reproduced furnishings as a museum about the statesman and his youth.[72]
Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Theodore Roosevelt Monument, with inaugural site in the background.jpg New York 1.18 acres (0.0048 km2) [73]
Thomas Cole
(affiliated area)
Cedar Grove.jpg New York [74]
Thomas Stone Thomas Stone National Historic Site 2009 2.jpg Maryland 328.25 acres (1.3284 km2) [75]
Touro Synagogue
(affiliated area)
Touro Synagogue, Newport, Rhode Island.jpg Rhode Island [76]
Tuskegee Airmen Hangar 1 from parking lot, Tuskegee Airmen NHS.jpg Alabama 89.68 acres (0.3629 km2) [77]
Tuskegee Institute Booker T. Washington residence - The Oaks.jpg Alabama 57.92 acres (0.2344 km2) [78]
Ulysses S. Grant White Haven - U.S. Grant Historic Site-06.jpg Missouri 9.60 acres (0.0388 km2) [79]
Vanderbilt Mansion Bridge and Weir at the Vanderbilt Mansion.jpg New York 211.65 acres (0.8565 km2) [80]
Washita Battlefield Washita battlefield national historic site.jpg Oklahoma 315.20 acres (1.2756 km2) [81]
Whitman Mission The Oregon Trail at the Whitman Mission in Walla Walla, WA.jpg Washington 138.53 acres (0.5606 km2) [82]
William Howard Taft William Howard Taft National Historic Site.JPG Ohio 3.64 acres (0.0147 km2) [83]

International Historic Site[edit]

There is one International Historic Site in the US park system, a unique designation given to Saint Croix Island, Maine, on the New Brunswick border. The title, given to the site of the first permanent French settlement in America, recognizes the influence that it has had on both Canada and the United States. The NPS does not distinguish among these designations in terms of their preservation or management policies.

National Historical Parks[edit]

In the United States, sites are "historic", while parks are "historical". The NPS explains that a site can be intrinsically historic, while a park is a modern legal invention. As such, a park is not itself "historic", but can be called "historical" when it contains historic resources. It is the resources which are historic, not the park.[84] There are 61 national historical parks.

National historical parks
Name Image Location Area[85] Description
Abraham Lincoln Birthplace Memorial Building 1.jpg Kentucky 344.50 acres (1.3941 km2) President Abraham Lincoln was born in 1809 in a one-room log cabin, which was reconstructed in a neoclassical memorial building. He lived until age seven on another farm nearby before moving to Indiana.[86]
Adams John Adams Birthplace.jpg Massachusetts 23.82 acres (0.0964 km2) The eleven buildings at this farm were home to United States presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams and several generations of their family. They include the John Adams Birthplace and John Quincy Adams Birthplace, the Stone Library, Peacefield mansion, and United First Parish Church, where they are buried.[87]
Appomattox Court House Slave quarters Appomattox VA1.jpg Virginia 1,774.60 acres (7.1816 km2) The end of the Civil War was initiated on April 9, 1865, with the Union victory at the Battle of Appomattox Court House, after which Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at the McLean House. Several hiking trails lead to historic cabins and other marked sites.[88]
Blackstone River Valley Slater and Wilkinson Mills - exterior & water power systems.jpg Rhode Island, Massachusetts 1,489.00 acres (6.0258 km2) Some of the earliest textile mills in America were built in the Blackstone Valley, developing the area into an industrial leader with several company towns connected by the Blackstone Canal. Five historic districts include preserved mill complexes.[89]
Boston Faneuil Hall (5813514354).jpg Massachusetts 43.82 acres (0.1773 km2) The Freedom Trail links several sites that made Boston important during the American Revolution. These include the Old State House, where the Boston Massacre took place; the Old North Church; the Old South Meeting House, where the Boston Tea Party was organized; Charlestown Navy Yard, home to the USS Constitution, and the 221 ft (67 m) Bunker Hill Monument at the site of the Battle of Bunker Hill.[90]
Brown v. Board of Education Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site.jpg Kansas, South Carolina 1.85 acres (0.0075 km2) Monroe Elementary School in Topeka was one of the city's four racially segregated schools for African American students. Brown v. Board of Education, a Supreme Court case brought by a parent at the school, held that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal" and segregation was unconstitutional. The park was expanded in 2022 to include two schools in South Carolina involved in the Briggs v. Elliott case that was combined with Brown.[91]
Cane River Creole Log house in the Cane River Creole National Historical Park.jpg Louisiana 205.50 acres (0.8316 km2) The Oakland and Magnolia Plantations represent the history of French Creole culture of Northern Louisiana. Generations of enslaved and tenant workers farmed cotton here, with 65 remaining buildings.[92]
Cedar Creek and Belle Grove Belle Grove house.jpg Virginia 3,704.96 acres (14.9934 km2) At the 1864 Battle of Cedar Creek, Union General Philip Sheridan's army fended off the last Confederate attempt to invade the North. The nearby Belle Grove Plantation served as Sheridan's headquarters and exhibits the history of farming and slavery in the Shenandoah Valley.[93]
Chaco Culture Chaco,-Chaco8.jpg New Mexico 33,960.19 acres (137.4320 km2) This canyon site was inhabited from the 9th to 12th centuries by the Ancestral Puebloans, who built the largest pre-colonial buildings in the US, including the great houses Pueblo Bonito and Chetro Ketl. Their architecture, archaeological artifacts, and petroglyphs, show the sophistication of this former economic center.[94]
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal 3- MG 0061-Edit-2.jpg District of Columbia, Maryland, West Virginia 19,617.37 acres (79.3887 km2) The 184 mi (296 km) Chesapeake and Ohio Canal shipped coal and other cargo down the Potomac River from Cumberland, Maryland, to Georgetown, Washington, D.C. from 1831 to 1924. Its towpath, alongside many preserved locks, is now a hiking and cycling trail, with more strenuous trails at Great Falls. It is also part of Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail.[95]
Colonial Yorktown County VA.jpg Virginia 8,675.04 acres (35.1066 km2) Founded in 1607, Jamestown was the first permanent English settlement in North America and served as the colonial capital until 1699. Historic Jamestown preserves its archaelogical ruins and is connected by the Colonial Parkway to the Yorktown Battlefield, where in 1781 George Washington's Continental Army defeated the British in the Siege of Yorktown, the last major battle of the Revolutionary War.[96]
Cumberland Gap Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia 24,546.83 acres (99.3375 km2) The Cumberland Gap of the Appalachian Mountains was a major passageway for Native Americans and later European settlers between the East Coast and the interior. Called the "first doorway of the west", the park includes the ridge of the Cumberland Mountains, the Gap Cave, and the Hensley Settlement.[97]
Dayton Aviation Heritage Huffman Prairie.jpg Ohio 110.56 acres (0.4474 km2) Dayton, Ohio, was home to Orville and Wilbur Wright, who invented powered flight. This multi-site park includes their Wright Cycle Company shop, Huffman Prairie Flying Field, where they conducted test flights, the Wright Company airplane factory, Orville's home Hawthorn Hill, and the Wright Brothers Aviation Center, as well as the Paul Laurence Dunbar House, home of poet Paul Laurence Dunbar[98]
First State First State National Historic Park by Greg Young.jpg Delaware, Pennsylvania 1,409.22 acres (5.7029 km2) Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, and this park features several sites dating to the colonial era. These include New Castle Court House, the first capitol of the state; Fort Christina and the Old Swedes Church, site of the first Swedish colony in America; Dover Green; the John Dickinson House, the plantation owned by founding father John Dickinson; and Brandywine Valley nature reserve.[99]
Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie South Carolina 232.52 acres (0.9410 km2) In April 1861 the South Carolina militia bombarded Fort Sumter, build on an artificial island in Charleston Harbor, initiating the Civil War. During a second battle in 1863 Union forces largely destroyed the fort, which was later rebuilt. Nearby Fort Moultrie, first built in 1776, defended Charleston from the British in the Battle of Sullivan's Island, and its palmetto log construction is represented on the Flag of South Carolina.[100]
George Rogers Clark George Rogers Clark Memorial - right murals.jpg Indiana 26.17 acres (0.1059 km2) George Rogers Clark sacked the British Fort Sackville on the Wabash River in 1779 during the Illinois campaign of the Revolutionary War. President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated a memorical to this victory in 1936. The circular domed Classical-style memorial has a bronze statue of Clark and seven murals depicting the events and their aftermath.[101]
Golden Spike A meeting of the engines at the Golden Spike National Historic Site, Utah (angled view).jpg Utah 2,735.28 acres (11.0693 km2) The rirst transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869 when the Union Pacific Railroad from Iowa connected with the Central Pacific Railroad from California at Promontory Summit. Leland Stanford ceremoniously drove the golden spike to join the final rails. Replica Jupiter and No. 119 locomotives on rebuilt rails are used in reenactment events at the park. An auto tour and a hiking trail follow routes of tracklaying race of 1869.[102]
Harpers Ferry 2010-09-02-Harpers-Ferry-From-Maryland-Heights-Panorama-Crop.jpg West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland 3,669.19 acres (14.8487 km2) In 1859 abolitionist John Brown conducted a raid on the arsenal at Harpers Ferry, a prelude to the Civil War; he was executed and became a martyr. John Brown's Fort remains in the historic lower town in West Virginia. Hiking trails in all three states have overlooks of the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers. The park also has the remains of Storer College, industrial ruins, and Civil War batteries.[103]
Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman National Historical Park (35403023243).jpg New York 31.50 acres (0.1275 km2) Harriet Tubman, a leading abolitionist and conductor in the Underground Railroad, moved to Auburn, New York, in 1859, where she continued to shelter Blacks moving north. The park features her residence, the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church she attended, and the Tubman Home for the Aged she founded for elderly African Americans.[104]
Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway - Cars Parked Before Buildings in Historic Downtown Cambridge - NARA - 7719109.jpg Maryland 480.00 acres (1.9425 km2) Harriet Tubman, after escaping slavery herself in 1849, guided 70 enslaved people from the Eastern Shore of Maryland to freedom during 13 trips. The fields, marshes, and woodlands of the park include the site of her childhood home, several farms sites she was forced to work at, the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, and a scenic byway.[105]
Homestead Homestead National monument of America, Historic Palmer-Epard cabin.jpg Nebraska 210.45 acres (0.8517 km2) After passage of the Homestead Act of 1862, hundreds of thousands of families moved west to farm federally owned land, which they would receive after five years of cultivation. This site includes some of the first acres claimed. Over 10% of the country was homesteaded, allocating land of the Native Americans to settlers. The site includes a historic cabin and school, heritage center, and restored tallgrass prairie, which was largely eradicated by the settlers.[106]
Hopewell Culture Hopewell Culture National Historical Park.jpg Ohio 1,775.78 acres (7.1863 km2) [107]
Independence Liberty Bell, 2016.jpg Pennsylvania 44.87 acres (0.1816 km2) The Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776 and the Constitution was drafted in 1787 at Independence Hall, then the Pennsylvania capitol in Philadelphia. The Liberty Bell resides across the street, and other historic buildings include the First Bank of the United States, Carpenters' Hall, and Congress Hall.[108]
Jean Lafitte Barataria Preserve, Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana.jpg Louisiana 25,875.86 acres (104.7159 km2) [109]
Jimmy Carter Georgia 78.35 acres (0.3171 km2) [110]
Kalaupapa Hawaii 10,778.88 acres (43.6206 km2) [111]
Kaloko-Honokōhau Maliu Point turtle beach Park Big island Hawaii (31338166057).jpg Hawaii 1,163.05 acres (4.7067 km2) This coastal park includes two fishponds and a fish trap used in Ancient Hawaiian aquaculture and brackish anchialine pools with ‘ōpae‘ula shrimp. Lava flows lead down to the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail, running along the beach and by ruins of an ancient heiau.[112]
Keweenaw Gfp-michigan-fort-wilkens-state-park-across-the-lake.jpg Michigan 1,870.00 acres (7.5676 km2) [113]
Klondike Gold Rush Alaska, Washington 12,996.49 acres (52.5949 km2) After gold was found at the Klondike River in 1896, 100,000 prospectors journeyed to the Yukon for the Klondike Gold Rush, most taking a route through Skagway, Alaska, along the Chilkoot Trail, which can still be hiked today, or the White Pass Trail.[114] The Seattle unit in Pioneer Square tells the city's history as a boomtown when prospectors passed through and bought their provisions.[115]
Lewis and Clark Clatsop County - Fort Clatsop - 20160606112655.jpg Oregon, Washington 3,410.15 acres (13.8004 km2) After crossing the continent to the Pacific Ocean, members of the Corps of Discovery Expedition spent the winter of 1805–1806 at Fort Clatsop, which was reconstructed from William Clark's journals. Lewis and Clark documented the nature and geography around the mouth of the Columbia River, including at the affiliated Ecola and Cape Disappointment State Parks.[116]
Lowell Boott courtyard.jpg Massachusetts 141.71 acres (0.5735 km2) [117]
Lyndon B. Johnson President Lyndon B. Johnson's boyhood home in Johnson City, Texas LCCN2014633827.tif Texas 1,571.71 acres (6.3605 km2) President Lyndon B. Johnson spent much of his life here in the Hill Country, where visitors can tour his reconstructed birthplace, boyhood home, and ranch. The still-working ranch was Johnson's Little White House where he spent a fifth of his presidency working and hosting guests. It also has the plane used as Air Force One.[118]
Manhattan Project X-10 Reactor 12.jpg New Mexico, Tennessee, Washington 113.61 acres (0.4598 km2) The Manhattan Project was a massive top secret project with the goal of producing an atomic weapon during World War II. Representing the multi-faceted nature of the project, the park consists of three units that were key to the development of the atomic bomb: Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Hanford, Washington. [119]
Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller Vermont 643.07 acres (2.6024 km2) [120]
Martin Luther King Jr. Behold statue & Ebenezer Baptist Church 1.jpg Georgia 39.17 acres (0.1585 km2) Civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born in 1929 in a home in Sweet Auburn, Atlanta, and succeeded his father as pastor of the Ebenezer Baptist Church down the street. After his 1968 assassination, the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, the site of his and his widow's tombs, was founded next door to the church. The historic district also includes the Fire Station No. 6 and period shotgun houses.[121]
Minute Man Minute Man National Historical Park (0a6d9a50-3395-472f-9e40-3d9f72a7d29a).jpg Massachusetts 1,027.76 acres (4.1592 km2) [122]
Morristown Ford Mansion Morristown NHP NJ2.jpg New Jersey 1,710.72 acres (6.9230 km2) [123]
Natchez Mississippi 119.75 acres (0.4846 km2) [124]
New Bedford Whaling Back in the 1800s (754e5cc7-6e5d-4571-b108-fab207ce714a).JPG Massachusetts 34.00 acres (0.1376 km2) [125]
New Orleans Jazz Louisiana 5.13 acres (0.0208 km2) [126]
Nez Perce Big-hole-national-battlefield-06022012-rogermpeterson-007 (7351656778).jpg Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington 4,564.93 acres (18.4736 km2) [127]
Ocmulgee Mounds Georgia 3,401.92 acres (13.7671 km2) People of the Mississippian culture built several large earthworks along the Ocmulgee River around 900–1100 CE, including ceremonial temples, platform mounds, and earth lodges. In the 1930s, the largest archaeological dig in U.S. history excavated millions of artifacts dating to more than 14,000 years ago. The park also has trails through forests and wetlands rich with wildlife.[128]
Palo Alto Battlefield Palo Alto Battlefield NHP.JPG Texas 3,426.87 acres (13.8681 km2) [129]
Paterson Great Falls Great Falls of Paterson 2016.jpg New Jersey 51.33 acres (0.2077 km2) [130]
Pecos Mission Church, Pecos National Park, Pecos, New Mexico 02.jpg New Mexico 6,693.49 acres (27.0876 km2) [131]
Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park(1).jpg Hawaii 419.80 acres (1.6989 km2) This "place of refuge" provided protection to defeated warriors and those who broke the kapu, or sacred laws of ancient Hawaiʻi. A long masonry wall separates the ceremonial site from the Royal Grounds, which includes the reconstructed Hale o Keawe, a heiau that was a mausoleum for local aliʻi, or high chiefs. The Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail passes through the park, alongside cliffs and volcanic tide pools.[132]
Reconstruction Era South Carolina 64.99 acres (0.2630 km2) [133]
Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front California 145.19 acres (0.5876 km2) [134]
Saint-Gaudens Saint-Gauden Little Studio.jpg New Hampshire 190.75 acres (0.7719 km2) [135]
Ste. Genevieve Photograph of the Location of the Felix Vallee House in Ste Genevieve MO.jpg Missouri 16.91 acres (0.0684 km2) [136]
Salt River Bay U.S. Virgin Islands 989.42 acres (4.0040 km2) [137]
San Antonio Missions Flying Buttresses Mission San Jose.JPG Texas 947.77 acres (3.8355 km2) [138]
San Francisco Maritime Eppleton Hall 2 (15409666017).jpg California 49.86 acres (0.2018 km2) This maritime museum has a collection of historic vessels including the steam ferry Eureka, the world's largest wooden ship; the square rig sailing ship Balclutha, schooners, and tugboats.[139]
San Juan Island Washington 2,145.56 acres (8.6828 km2) With the U.S. and Great Britain engaged in a boundary dispute over the San Juan Islands, the killing of a pig in 1859 led both sides to form military camps on opposite ends of San Juan Island. The bloodless Pig War ended 13 years later when the U.S. was decided the owner of the islands. Both the American and English camps have surviving buildings, developed trails, and shoreline.[140]
Saratoga British Canon, Revolutionary War.jpg New York 3,579.14 acres (14.4843 km2) [141]
Sitka Alaska 116.29 acres (0.4706 km2) [142]
Thomas Edison Edison laboratories NJ2.jpg New Jersey 21.25 acres (0.0860 km2) Inventor and industrialist Thomas Edison moved to the Glenmont mansion in 1886 and opened his nearby laboratory complex the next year. His company developed phonographs, batteries, movie cameras, and numerous other products in over 40 years in operation in West Orange. The park has several early cars from Edison's collection and a reproduction of the Black Maria, the first movie studio.[143]
Tumacácori Tuma MS 01 (32) (cropped).jpg Arizona 360.32 acres (1.4582 km2) [144]
Valley Forge Artillery Park in the Snow.jpg Pennsylvania 3,468.54 acres (14.0367 km2) The Continental Army was encamped at Valley Forge during the winter and spring of 1777–1778, where they were led by General George Washington and trained by Baron von Steuben in preparation for the Revolutionary War. The site is preserved with Washington's Headquarters, reconstructed cabins displaying soldiers' hardship, and the 1917 National Memorial Arch.[145]
War in the Pacific War in the Pacific National Historical Park.jpg Guam 2,030.65 acres (8.2177 km2) This park commemorates the bravery and sacrifice of those who participated in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Park units include the Asan and Agat Invasion Beaches where U.S. troops landed in 1944 after Japanese occupation, the Piti Guns and other Japanese defensive sites, and memorials.[146]
Weir Farm Weir Farm National Historic Site - Weir Farmhouse rear.jpg Connecticut 74.20 acres (0.3003 km2) [147]
Women's Rights Elizabeth Cady Stanton House with plaque 2013.jpg New York 7.44 acres (0.0301 km2) [148]

International Historical Park[edit]

Klondike Gold Rush International Historical Park was formally established by the United States and Canada in 1998, the year of the centennial of the gold rush the park commemorates. The park comprises Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Washington and Alaska, and Chilkoot Trail National Historic Site in British Columbia. It was this trail which so many prospectors took in hopes of making their fortunes in the Klondike River district of Yukon.

See also[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Special Initiatives in the Northeastern Area/Grey Towers National Historic Site". 2006-01-18. Retrieved 2008-02-12.
  2. ^ "LIST OF NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS BY STATE" (PDF). nps.gov. National Park Service. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  3. ^ "Listing of Acreage (Summary)" (PDF). NPS Stats. National Park Service. December 31, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  4. ^ "Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  5. ^ "Andersonville National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  6. ^ "Andrew Johnson National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  7. ^ "Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  8. ^ "Boston African American National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  9. ^ "Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  10. ^ "Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  11. ^ "Charles Pinckney National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  12. ^ "Chimney Rock National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service)". www.nps.gov. Retrieved 2022-02-24.
  13. ^ "Christiansted National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  14. ^ "Clara Barton National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  15. ^ "Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  16. ^ "Eisenhower National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  17. ^ "Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  18. ^ "Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  19. ^ "Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  20. ^ "Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  21. ^ "Ford's Theatre National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  22. ^ "Fort Bowie National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  23. ^ "Fort Davis National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  24. ^ "Fort Laramie National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  25. ^ "Fort Larned National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  26. ^ "Fort Point National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  27. ^ "Fort Raleigh National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  28. ^ "Fort Scott National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  29. ^ "Fort Smith National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  30. ^ "Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  31. ^ "Fort Vancouver National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  32. ^ "Frederick Douglass National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  33. ^ "Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  34. ^ "Friendship Hill National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  35. ^ "Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  36. ^ "Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  37. ^ "Grey Towers National Historic Site". U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  38. ^ "Hampton National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  39. ^ "Harry S. Truman National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  40. ^ "Herbert Hoover National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  41. ^ "Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  42. ^ "Honouliuli National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  43. ^ "Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  44. ^ "Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  45. ^ "James A. Garfield National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  46. ^ "John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  47. ^ "John Muir National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  48. ^ "Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  49. ^ "Lincoln Home National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  50. ^ "Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  51. ^ "Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  52. ^ "Lower East Side Tenement National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  53. ^ "Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  54. ^ "Manzanar National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  55. ^ "Martin Van Buren National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  56. ^ "Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  57. ^ "Minidoka National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  58. ^ "Minuteman Missile National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  59. ^ "Nicodemus National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  60. ^ "Ninety Six National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  61. ^ "Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  62. ^ "President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  63. ^ "Puʻukoholā Heiau National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  64. ^ "Sagamore Hill National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  65. ^ "Saint Paul's Church National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  66. ^ "Salem Maritime National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  67. ^ "San Juan National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  68. ^ "Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  69. ^ "Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  70. ^ "Springfield Armory National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  71. ^ "Steamtown National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  72. ^ "Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  73. ^ "Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  74. ^ "Thomas Cole National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  75. ^ "Thomas Stone National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  76. ^ "Touro Synagogue National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  77. ^ "Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  78. ^ "Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  79. ^ "Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  80. ^ "Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  81. ^ "Washita Battlefield National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  82. ^ "Whitman Mission National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  83. ^ "William Howard Taft National Historic Site". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  84. ^ U.S. National Park Service, Headquarters Office, Washington, DC. Personal letter.
  85. ^ "Listing of Acreage (Summary)" (PDF). NPS Stats. National Park Service. December 31, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  86. ^ "Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  87. ^ "Adams National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  88. ^ "Appomattox Court House National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  89. ^ "Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  90. ^ "Boston National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  91. ^ "Brown v. Board of Education National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved May 13, 2022.
  92. ^ "Cane River Creole National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  93. ^ "Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  94. ^ "Chaco Culture National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  95. ^ "Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  96. ^ "Colonial National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  97. ^ "Cumberland Gap National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  98. ^ "Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  99. ^ "First State National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  100. ^ "Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  101. ^ "George Rogers Clark National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  102. ^ "Golden Spike National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  103. ^ "Harpers Ferry National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  104. ^ "Harriet Tubman National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  105. ^ "Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  106. ^ "Homestead National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  107. ^ "Hopewell Culture National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  108. ^ "Independence National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  109. ^ "Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  110. ^ "Jimmy Carter National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  111. ^ "Kalaupapa National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  112. ^ "Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  113. ^ "Keweenaw National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  114. ^ "Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  115. ^ "Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park – Seattle Unit". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  116. ^ "Lewis and Clark National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  117. ^ "Lowell National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  118. ^ "Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  119. ^ "Manhattan Project National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  120. ^ "Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  121. ^ "Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  122. ^ "Minute Man National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  123. ^ "Morristown National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  124. ^ "Natchez National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  125. ^ "New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  126. ^ "New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  127. ^ "Nez Perce National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  128. ^ "Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  129. ^ "Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  130. ^ "Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  131. ^ "Pecos National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  132. ^ "Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  133. ^ "Reconstruction Era National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  134. ^ "Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  135. ^ "Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  136. ^ "Ste. Genevieve National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  137. ^ "Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  138. ^ "San Antonio Missions National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  139. ^ "San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  140. ^ "San Juan Island National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  141. ^ "Saratoga National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  142. ^ "Sitka National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  143. ^ "Thomas Edison National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  144. ^ "Tumacácori National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  145. ^ "Valley Forge National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  146. ^ "War in the Pacific National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  147. ^ "Weir Farm National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  148. ^ "Women's Rights National Historical Park". National Park Service. Retrieved October 11, 2021.

External links[edit]