National Immigration Law Center

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The National Immigration Law Center (NILC) is a center in the United States that "engages in policy analysis, litigation, education and advocacy, to achieve [the] vision" of "a society in which all people — regardless of race, gender, immigration or economic status — are treated fairly and humanely." They claim to concentrate on social, economic, and racial justice for low-income immigrants.[1] They have offices in Washington, D.C. (the capital of the United States), as well as in Los Angeles and Oakland, California.[2]

Activities[edit]

NILC plays a role both in advocacy to influence legislation in a manner that would provide greater justice to immigrants and in spreading awareness and information so that immigrants can better navigate the existing social, political, and legal landscape. Unlike the National Immigrant Justice Center, they do not provide or facilitate direct legal representation to immigrants.[3] Their activities include publishing information on immigration reform legislation, immigration enforcement, workers' rights, education, driver's licenses, taxes, and litigation. Their litigation activities are intended as impact litigation, i.e., they focus on litigation that might have an effect on state laws or on the judicial interpretation of these laws.[4]

External coverage[edit]

Media coverage[edit]

The New York Times lists NILC as one of the main advocacy groups related to immigration in the United States, alongside the Federation for American Immigration Reform, National Immigration Forum, and American Immigration Lawyers Association. NILC has been cited in discussions of immigration and immigrant legal rights in the New York Times,[5] the Wall Street Journal,[6][7] Forbes,[8] and the Washington Post.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About us". National Immigration Law Center. Archived from the original on January 29, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Contact Us". National Immigration Law Center. Archived from the original on January 26, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Disclaimer". National Immigration Law Center. Archived from the original on June 11, 2013. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Litigation". National Immigration Law Center. Archived from the original on January 29, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  5. ^ Preston, Julia (June 9, 2011). "Alabama: Tough Immigration Measure Becomes Law". New York Times. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  6. ^ Jordan, Miriam (April 30, 2010). "Arizona Immigration Law Attracts Its First Legal Challenges". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  7. ^ Meckler, Laura (February 7, 2014). "Immigration Impasse Could Rekindle Fight Over Deportations. House's Retreat on Legislation Puts Obama Administration in a Tight Spot". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  8. ^ Matthews, Merrill (July 17, 2013). "Immigration Bill's Health Care Provisions Could Get U.S. Workers Fired". Forbes. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 
  9. ^ Nakamura, David (August 1, 2014). "Obama readies executive action on immigration". Washington Post. Retrieved August 8, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Official website