National Latino AIDS Awareness Day

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National Latino AIDS Awareness Day
FoundedOctober 15, 2003 (2003-10-15)
Location
  • 24 W 25th Street, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10010 USA
Area served
United States of America and its territories
Methodcommunity mobilization and social marketing
Key people
latinoaids.org
hispanicfederation.org
Websitewww.nlaad.org

National Latino AIDS Awareness Day (NLAAD) (Spanish : El Dia Nacional de Concientizacion Latina del SIDA) takes place in the United States of America and its territories on October 15, the last day of National Hispanic Heritage Month, and aims to increase awareness of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in the Hispanic/Latino population living in the United States including Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. It is a national community mobilizing and social marketing campaign co-ordinated by the Latino Commission on AIDS and the Hispanic Federation in partnership with commercial sponsors, community and public health organisations.[1][2]

National coordination, local ownership[edit]

A National Planning Committee coordinates NLAAD, retains a national convenor and supplies participating organisations with materials such as campaign kits and with advice. Each local participating organisation organises its own activities tailored to their particular community. All aim to promote or sponsor prevention activities, including counselling and testing. Some also undertake to educate community leaders and public officials in reducing new infections and caring for Latinos living with HIV/AIDS. Some organise cultural events and celebrations. Each local group is largely responsible for raising funds for their organized activities.[2][3]

History[edit]

2003[edit]

The first NLAAD was in 2003, initiated by the Latino Commission on AIDS under the leadership of Dennis deLeon[1] joined by the Hispanic Federation and attracted support from various community groups. In a media release announcing the event, deLeon was quoted: "AIDS has disproportionately affected Latinos whom represent 14% of the United States population (including Puerto Rico), but as a percentage of the national number of People Living with AIDS, Latinos represent a staggering 20%. ... There is no reason why Latinos should be disproportionately affected except for neglect by community leaders and government funders".[4] The day was observed in more than 100 cities around the United States including New York, Miami, Los Angeles and Chicago.[5] Events around the theme Prevention Saves Lives included "proclamation ceremonies", press conferences, educational and cultural events, HIV testing and counselling.[6]

2004[edit]

The theme for NLAAD in 2004 was Abre Los Ojos: el VIH No Tiene Fronteras - Open Your Eyes: HIV Has No Borders. The day was recognised with statements by Tommy Thompson as Secretary of Health and Human Services[7] and Anthony Fauci as Director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases[8] Activities were organised in almost 250 cities in 45 states "to increase HIV awareness among Latinos, and to address the stigma and discrimination associated with AIDS" and attracted sponsors including American Airlines, Verizon Foundation, Abbott Laboratories, Boehringer Ingelheim, Terra, PR Newswire, Viacom, Univision and NBC/Telemundo.[9]

2005[edit]

By the third NLAAD in 2005, the number of community partner organisations had reached 1000 and the day was marked in more than 350 cities in 46 states and in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands around the message Abre los ojos: Ama Tu Vida, Protegete, Hazte La Prueba - Open Your Eyes: Love Your Life, Protect Yourself, Get Tested. Activities included prevention education, free testing, press conferences, public service announcements on major television networks and a Congressional briefing in Washington, D.C. on 18 October 2005.[10]

2006[edit]

Saber Es Poder. Infórmate. Hazte La Prueba Del VIH - Knowledge is Power. Get the Facts. Get Tested for HIV. was the theme of the 2006 NLAAD.[11][12]

2007[edit]

The fifth NLAAD in 2007 adopted the theme Despierta! Toma Control! Hazte la Prueba del VIH! Wake Up! Take Control! Take the HIV Test!. Publicity was also given to a draft Hispanic/Latino national agenda prepared by "Hispanic/Latino organizations, departments of health, elected and designated officials".[13]

2008[edit]

United We Can: HIV/AIDS Stops Here. Prevention Starts With Us. Unidos Podemos: Detengamos Al VIH/SIDA. La Prevencion Empieza Con Nosotros was the theme for the sixth NLAAD in 2008. NLAAD claimed "380 partners who together, organized 160 events in 101 cities across the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands."[14][15]

2008 also saw the release of "SOY" ("I AM") as an official media component of NLAAD. Produced by The Kaiser Family Foundation and Univision Communications, SOY was described as a "Spanish-language media campaign featuring the personal stories of a diverse group of Latinos living with HIV and the people who love them."[16]

2009[edit]

The seventh NLAAD in 2009 adopted the theme United We Can Stop HIV and Prevent AIDS" - Unidos Podemos Detener el VIH y Prevenir el SIDA placing an emphasis on community unity.[17] NLAAD reported 420 partners and 350 events in 35 states in 2009.[17]

2010[edit]

Save a Life, It May be your Own. Get Tested for HIV was chosen as the theme for the eighth NLAAD in 2010.[18] In the lead-up to the day, there was an official launch of a new NLAAD bi-lingual website.[19] 131 registered events were listed at the website.[20]

2011[edit]

The theme for the ninth NLAAD was Latinos stand together! Let's stay healthy! Get Tested for HIV placing HIV awareness in a general health awareness context.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hevesi, Dennis (14 December 2009). "Dennis deLeon, AIDS Activist, Dies at 61". New York Times online edition. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  2. ^ a b "About Us". National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. Archived from the original on 15 April 2013. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  3. ^ "National Latino AIDS Awareness Day". Louisiana Latino Health Coalition for HIV/AIDS Awareness. Archived from the original on 25 May 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  4. ^ "Latino Leaders Respond to HIV/AIDS State of Emergency in the Hispanic Community Coalition Formed to Celebrate First National Latino AIDS Awareness Day". New York and Los Angeles. PR Newswire. 10 October 2003.
  5. ^ "Latino Leaders Join Forces to Commemorate First National Latino AIDS Awareness Day". New York. PR Newswire. 10 October 2003.
  6. ^ "Latino Leaders From Across the Nation Declare October 15th First National Latino AIDS Awareness Day 100 Cities From Across U.S. Sponsor Programs & Events to Respond to Disproportionate Impact of HIV/AIDS in Latino Community". New York. PR Newswire. 15 October 2003.
  7. ^ "Statement by Tommy G. Thompson Secretary of Health and Human Services Regarding National Latino AIDS Awareness Day". Federal Information & News Dispatch, Inc. U.S. Health & Human Services Documents. 15 October 2004.
  8. ^ "Statement of Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, on National Latino Aids Awareness Day". Federal Information & News Dispatch, Inc. National Institutes of Health Documents. 15 October 2004.
  9. ^ "Latinos Across the Country Commemorate National Latino AIDS Awareness Day Latino Leaders From the Nation Address the HIV Epidemic". PR Newswire Association LLC. PR Newswire. 16 October 2004.
  10. ^ "3rd Annual National Latino Aids Awareness Day Unites Over 46 States From Coast to Coast The Last Day Of Hispanic Heritage Month Will Be Reserved To Spread The Message: 'Love Your Life, Protect Yourself, Get Tested For HIV'". PR Newswire Association LLC. PR Newswire. 18 October 2005.
  11. ^ "Communities Rally for 4th Annual National Latino AIDS Awareness; Local Events Across the Nation Offer Testing and Prevention Education for Latinos". PR Newswire Association LLC. PR Newswire. 17 October 2006.
  12. ^ "NYC Councilmembers to Take HIV Test in Commemoration of National Latino Aids Awareness Day; New York City Councilmembers and Latino Leaders to Speak Out Against Proposed Federal Funding Cuts to HIV Treatment and Care". U.S. Newswire. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. U.S. Newswire. 11 October 2006.
  13. ^ "Latinos/Hispanics Across the Nation Recognize National Latino AIDS Awareness Day and Call to Action Leaders in Promoting HIV Testing, Prevention and Access to Care". PR Newswire Association LLC. PR Newswire. 16 October 2007.
  14. ^ "Highlights: National Latino AIDS Awareness Day 2008". National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. Retrieved 9 August 2011.[permanent dead link]
  15. ^ "National Latino AIDS Awareness Day -- October 15, 2008". MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 57 (40): 1105. 2008-10-10. ISSN 0149-2195.
  16. ^ "Kaiser Family Foundation and Univision Launch First National Spanish-Language Media Campaign Featuring HIV-Positive Latinos and Loved Ones". Targeted News Service. 18 September 2008.
  17. ^ a b "The Final Theme". National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. Retrieved 9 August 2011.[permanent dead link] Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "NLAAD_2009Theme" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  18. ^ "Organizer Offers Glimpse of Upcoming National Latino AIDS Awareness Day". Close-Up Media, Inc. Wireless News. 11 June 2010.
  19. ^ "National Latino AIDS Awareness Day Official Launching 2010 Website". Latino Commission on AIDS. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  20. ^ "Events". National Latino AIDS Awareness Day. Archived from the original on 15 April 2013. Retrieved 9 August 2011.
  21. ^ "Organizers Gear Up for National Latino AIDS Awareness". Close-Up Media, Inc. Wireless News. 27 April 2011.

External links[edit]