National Register of Historic Places listings in Asotin County, Washington

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Location of Asotin County in Washington

This list presents the full set of buildings, structures, objects, sites, or districts designated on the National Register of Historic Places in Asotin County, Washington, and offers brief descriptive information about each of them. The National Register recognizes places of national, state, or local historic significance across the United States.[1] Out of over 90,000 National Register sites nationwide,[2] Washington is home to approximately 1,500,[3] and 8 of those are found in Asotin County.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted October 4, 2018.[4]

Current listings[edit]

[5] Name on the Register Image Date listed[6] Location City or town Description
1 Clarkston Public Library
Clarkston Public Library
August 3, 1982
(#82004193)
1001 6th Street
46°24′38″N 117°02′43″W / 46.41066°N 117.04523°W / 46.41066; -117.04523 (Clarkston Public Library)
Clarkston Carnegie library built in 1913.
2 Cloverland Garage
Cloverland Garage
May 2, 1986
(#86000895)
Along Cloverland Road, about 0.11 miles (0.18 km) from its junction with Roupe Road
46°15′07″N 117°15′03″W / 46.25203°N 117.25091°W / 46.25203; -117.25091 (Cloverland Garage)
Cloverland
3 Full Gospel Church
Full Gospel Church
January 19, 1972
(#72001266)
305 1st Street
46°20′28″N 117°03′05″W / 46.34107°N 117.05133°W / 46.34107; -117.05133 (Full Gospel Church)
Asotin
4 Grande Ronde River Bridge
Grande Ronde River Bridge
March 28, 1995
(#95000262)
On State Route 129, about 23 miles (37 km) southwest of Asotin
46°02′30″N 117°15′09″W / 46.04159°N 117.25251°W / 46.04159; -117.25251 (Grande Ronde River Bridge)
Asotin Built in 1941 over Grande Ronde River, this was perhaps the first steel girder bridge in the state highway system, and is still in use.
5 Indian Timothy Memorial Bridge
Indian Timothy Memorial Bridge
July 16, 1982
(#82004194)
Spans Alpowa Creek, about 8 miles (13 km) west of Clarkston
46°24′43″N 117°12′48″W / 46.411930°N 117.213301°W / 46.411930; -117.213301 (Indian Timothy Memorial Bridge)
Clarkston Only concrete tied arch bridge in the state, built in 1923. Stands parallel to current bridge.
6 Snake River Archeological District May 13, 1976
(#76001868)
Address restricted[7]
Asotin
7 U.S. Post Office – Clarkston Main
U.S. Post Office – Clarkston Main
May 30, 1991
(#91000642)
949 6th Street
46°24′40″N 117°02′43″W / 46.41111°N 117.04531°W / 46.41111; -117.04531 (U.S. Post Office – Clarkston Main)
Clarkston Buff-colored brick post office building which has a low-relief sculpted eagle within an aluminum grille on its front facade.
8 C. C. Van Arsdol House
C. C. Van Arsdol House
May 6, 1975
(#75001839)
1011 15th Street
46°24′38″N 117°04′07″W / 46.41044°N 117.06862°W / 46.41044; -117.06862 (C. C. Van Arsdol House)
Clarkston A home of civil engineer Cassius C. Van Arsdol.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andrus, Patrick W.; Shrimpton, Rebecca H.; et al. (2002), How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation, National Register Bulletin (15), National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, retrieved June 20, 2014.
  2. ^ National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places Program: Research, retrieved January 28, 2015.
  3. ^ Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, Washington Information System for Architectural and Archaeological Records Data (WISAARD), retrieved February 14, 2015.
  4. ^ https://www.nps.gov/subjects/nationalregister/weekly-list.htm "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions"]. National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on October 4, 2018.
  5. ^ Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  6. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  7. ^ Federal and state laws and practices restrict general public access to information regarding the specific location of this resource. In some cases, this is to protect archeological sites from vandalism, while in other cases it is restricted at the request of the owner. See: Knoerl, John; Miller, Diane; Shrimpton, Rebecca H. (1990), Guidelines for Restricting Information about Historic and Prehistoric Resources, National Register Bulletin (29), National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, OCLC 20706997.

External links[edit]

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