National Register of Historic Places listings in Audubon County, Iowa

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Location of Audubon County in Iowa

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Audubon County, Iowa.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Audubon County, Iowa, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.[1]

There are 14 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 19, 2017.[2]
[3] Name on the Register[4] Image Date listed[5] Location City or town Description
1 Audubon County Court House
Audubon County Court House
August 28, 2003
(#03000826)
318 Leroy St.
41°43′18″N 94°55′47″W / 41.721530°N 94.929594°W / 41.721530; -94.929594 (Audubon County Court House)
Audubon The Audubon County Court House designed by Keffer and Jones of Des Moine in the PWA Moderne style in 1939, is significant as one of ten county courthouses built in Iowa during the New Deal Era as part of the federal Public Works Administration.[6]
2 Audubon County Courthouse Upload image
July 26, 1977
(#77000493)
Washington and Kilworth Sts.
41°35′29″N 94°52′30″W / 41.591389°N 94.875°W / 41.591389; -94.875 (Audubon County Courthouse)
Exira Served as the Audubon County Courthouse from 1874 to 1879, and is the first building erected in the county specifically for use as a county government facility. In 1887, Knights of Pythias Lodge took over the rent, and rented the lower floor to travelling musical and theater troupes, and later to entrepreneurs who showed silent movies. Community plays and dances were also held here.[7]
3 Audubon County Home Historic District Upload image
March 17, 2015
(#15000080)
1891 215th St.
41°41′44″N 94°55′21″W / 41.695681°N 94.922570°W / 41.695681; -94.922570 (Audubon County Home Historic District)
Audubon vicinity
4 Bennedsen, Boldt, and Hansen Building Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001460)
Main St.
41°37′42″N 95°04′21″W / 41.628333°N 95.0725°W / 41.628333; -95.0725 (Bennedsen, Boldt, and Hansen Building)
Kimballton 1913 commercial building, built by Danish immigrant settlers.[8]
5 Bethany Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001457)
1.5 miles north of Iowa Highway 44 and 1 mile east of Iowa Highway 68
41°39′08″N 95°03′11″W / 41.652222°N 95.053056°W / 41.652222; -95.053056 (Bethany Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church)
Kimballton 1898 church significant for its association with an important United Church congregation following the split in the Danish Lutheran Church in 1894.[9]
6 John D. Bush House Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001461)
219 N. Kilworth
41°35′39″N 94°52′32″W / 41.594167°N 94.875556°W / 41.594167; -94.875556 (John D. Bush House)
Exira 1873 Gabled-ell house built by Danish immigrant carpenter Jens Uriah Hansen, who was the first Dane to settle in the county.[10]
7 Andrew P. Hansen Farmstead Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001458)
Between Iowa Highway 44 and County Road P58 on Little Elkhorn Creek
41°36′01″N 94°59′06″W / 41.600278°N 94.985°W / 41.600278; -94.985 (Andrew P. Hansen Farmstead)
Brayton 1894 farmstead including a hipped foursquare house built by Danish immigrants[11]
8 Immanuel Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001462)
Eastern side of W. 2nd St.
41°37′46″N 95°04′28″W / 41.629375°N 95.074514°W / 41.629375; -95.074514 (Immanuel Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church)
Kimballton Gothic and Queen Anne styled church built by Danish immigrants significant for its association with the Grundtvigian synod of the Danish Lutheran Church following the historic split within the church in 1894.[12]
9 Hans J. Jorgensen Barn Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001452)
Junction of Iowa Highway 44 and Main St.
41°37′55″N 95°04′25″W / 41.631944°N 95.073611°W / 41.631944; -95.073611 (Hans J. Jorgensen Barn)
Kimballton Square hipped barn with a distinctive pyramidal roofs built by Danish Immigrant settler Hans J. Jorgesen, an instrumental person in the growth of the community of Kimballton.[13]
10 Kimballton Commercial District Upload image
August 18, 1995
(#95001016)
Junction of Alfred and Main Sts.
41°37′44″N 95°04′22″W / 41.628889°N 95.072778°W / 41.628889; -95.072778 (Kimballton Commercial District)
Kimballton 1889-1940 commercial buildings, significant for their influence of the Danish immigrant and Danish American craftmanship.[14]
11 Kimballton West 2nd – West 3rd Street Residential District Upload image
August 18, 1995
(#95001017)
Roughly W. 2nd St. from Iowa Highway 44 to south of Odense St. and W. 3rd St. from Iowa Highway 44 to Esbeck St.
41°37′43″N 95°04′32″W / 41.628611°N 95.075556°W / 41.628611; -95.075556 (Kimballton West 2nd – West 3rd Street Residential District)
Kimballton Residential neighborhood with late 19th & 20th Century homes including Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Prairie School, and Craftsman styles.[15]
12 Hans M. Koch House Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001453)
Western side of Iowa Highway 173, 0.5 miles south of Kimballton
41°37′12″N 95°04′25″W / 41.62°N 95.073611°W / 41.62; -95.073611 (Hans M. Koch House)
Kimballton A 1908 gabled double-pile home built to serve as the manager's residence for the Crystal Springs brickworks.[16]
13 Jens T. Larsen House Upload image
October 3, 1991
(#91001451)
103 Main St.
41°37′37″N 95°04′23″W / 41.626944°N 95.073056°W / 41.626944; -95.073056 (Jens T. Larsen House)
Kimballton 1894 gabled ell house, a unique example of skilled Danish immigrant craftsmen, Anders and Thorvald Jensen.[17]
14 Poplar Rural District Upload image
April 9, 1992
(#91001463)
Roughly the area from Poplar south and west to Wolf Creek
41°40′28″N 95°06′29″W / 41.674444°N 95.108056°W / 41.674444; -95.108056 (Poplar Rural District)
Jacksonville Danish rural farming community of the largest rural Danish immigrant settlement in Iowa and the United States, with the district still appearing much as it did during the early 1900s.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The latitude and longitude information provided in this table was derived originally from the National Register Information System, which has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. For about 1% of NRIS original coordinates, experience has shown that one or both coordinates are typos or otherwise extremely far off; some corrections may have been made. A more subtle problem causes many locations to be off by up to 150 yards, depending on location in the country: most NRIS coordinates were derived from tracing out latitude and longitudes off of USGS topographical quadrant maps created under the North American Datum of 1927, which differs from the current, highly accurate WGS84 GPS system used by most on-line maps. Chicago is about right, but NRIS longitudes in Washington are higher by about 4.5 seconds, and are lower by about 2.0 seconds in Maine. Latitudes differ by about 1.0 second in Florida. Some locations in this table may have been corrected to current GPS standards.
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on May 19, 2017.
  3. ^ Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  4. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-24). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  5. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  6. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Audubon County Court House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  7. ^ Milliman, Leon. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Audubon County Courthouse (Exira)" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  8. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Bennedsen, Boldt, and Hansen Building" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  9. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Bethany Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  10. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - John D. Bush House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  11. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form: Andrew P. Hansen Farmstead" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  12. ^ Lillehoj, Jeanette. "National Register of Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form: Immanuel Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 5 October 2015. 
  13. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Hans J. Jorgsensen Barn" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  14. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Kimballton Commercial District" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  15. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Kimballton West 2nd--West 3rd Street Residential District" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  16. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Koch, Hans M., House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  17. ^ Rogers, Leah. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Larsen, Jens T., House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  18. ^ Johnson, Roslea. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form - Poplar Rural District" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 6 October 2015.