National Register of Historic Places listings in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin

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Location of Fond du Lac County in Wisconsin

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. It is intended to provide a comprehensive listing of entries in the National Register of Historic Places that are located in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. The locations of National Register properties for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below may be seen in a map.[1]

There are 47 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 19, 2017.[2]

Current listings[edit]

[3] Name on the Register[4] Image Date listed[5] Location City or town Description
1 Aetna Station No. 5
Aetna Station No. 5
December 12, 1976
(#76000059)
193 N. Main St.
43°47′03″N 88°26′46″W / 43.784167°N 88.446111°W / 43.784167; -88.446111 (Aetna Station No. 5)
Fond du Lac 2-story Italianate-styled fire station designed by local architect Thomas Green and built in 1875, with a 4-story hose-drying tower topped by a wooden belvedere holding a fire bell.[6][7]
2 Baptist Church
Baptist Church
March 29, 2007
(#07000237)
133 East Fond Du Lac St.
43°50′39″N 88°50′15″W / 43.844167°N 88.8375°W / 43.844167; -88.8375 (Baptist Church)
Ripon Greek Revival church built in 1857 by the Baptist congregation. Sold to the local American Legion post in 1932. Now the oldest remaining church building in Ripon.[8][9]
3 Brandon Village Hall and Library
Brandon Village Hall and Library
January 9, 2008
(#07001388)
117 E. Main St.
43°44′06″N 88°46′57″W / 43.735°N 88.7825°W / 43.735; -88.7825 (Brandon Village Hall and Library)
Brandon In 1894 Charles Ellis constructed this building with a harness shop on the first floor and cold storage above. In 1897 the village of Brandon bought the building and reconfigured it for meeting halls, the fire department, and eventually the library.[10][11]
4 Ceresco Site
Ceresco Site
September 5, 1975
(#75000064)
Bounded by North, Church, Union, and both sides of Warren Sts.
43°50′55″N 88°51′07″W / 43.848611°N 88.851944°W / 43.848611; -88.851944 (Ceresco Site)
Ripon Site of an agricultural commune based on Fourierist ideals, a.k.a. the Wisconsin Phalanx, which was founded in 1844 and disbanded in 1851.[12][13]
5 Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot
Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot
August 10, 1990
(#90001232)
182 Forest Ave.
43°46′34″N 88°27′13″W / 43.776111°N 88.453611°W / 43.776111; -88.453611 (Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot)
Fond du Lac Depot of the CNW, designed by Charles Sumner Frost in Richardsonian Romanesque style and built in 1891. Served as a depot until the 1970s.[14]
6 Club Harbor
Club Harbor
January 22, 1980
(#80000135)
Jct. of WI 151 and WI W
43°54′51″N 88°18′50″W / 43.914167°N 88.313889°W / 43.914167; -88.313889 (Club Harbor)
Pipe 2.5 story brick stagecoach inn, built by Rufus Eaton in 1846 along the Military Road that linked Fort Howard and Fort Winnebago. Operated by Jacob Fuhrman from 1856.[15][16]
7 William I Cole House
William I Cole House
March 28, 2002
(#02000283)
303 Gillett St.
43°46′41″N 88°26′09″W / 43.778056°N 88.435833°W / 43.778056; -88.435833 (William I Cole House)
Fond du Lac 2-story Italianate home with corner pilasters, built in 1857 for William Cole, vice-president of the Cole Savings Bank.[17]
8 George and Mary Agnes Dana House
George and Mary Agnes Dana House
March 6, 2002
(#02000148)
136 Sheboygan St.
43°46′46″N 88°26′28″W / 43.779444°N 88.441111°W / 43.779444; -88.441111 (George and Mary Agnes Dana House)
Fond du Lac Two-story 1906 Craftsman-style house with hip roof and Tudor Revival details on the outside, but a Classical interior with Art Nouveau details. George was an owner of the Globe Furniture Company.[18][19]
9 East Division Street-Sheboygan Street Historic District
East Division Street-Sheboygan Street Historic District
April 7, 2010
(#10000169)
East Division St. generally bounded by Oaklawn Ave. and Amory St.; Sheboygan St. generally bounded by Everett St. and N.
43°46′44″N 88°26′16″W / 43.778806°N 88.437775°W / 43.778806; -88.437775 (East Division Street-Sheboygan Street Historic District)
Fond du Lac Large residential historic district with 122 contributing properties.[20][21] Examples of different styles include the 1852 Greek Revival Hamilton house,[22] the 1875 Second Empire Pierron house,[23] the 1880 Italianate Huber house,[24] the 1885 Gothic Revival Simmons house,[25] the 1890 Queen Anne Boyle house,[26] the c1900 Craftsman Longua house,[27] the 1902 Mediterranean Revival Lyons house,[28] the 1920 Georgian Revival Snow house,[29] the 1927 Colonial Revival Gerhard house,[30] and the 1931 Tudor Revival Kraut house.[31]
10 Rudolph and Louise Ebert House
Rudolph and Louise Ebert House
April 1, 2002
(#02000327)
199 E. Division St.
43°46′52″N 88°26′21″W / 43.781111°N 88.439167°W / 43.781111; -88.439167 (Rudolph and Louise Ebert House)
Fond du Lac 2.5 story Queen Anne house with two large towers and matching carriage house, built in 1892. Rudolph was president of the German American Savings Bank, Registrar, and city treasurer.[32][33]
11 El Dorado Apartments
El Dorado Apartments
January 22, 1992
(#91001979)
130 Forest Ave.
43°46′37″N 88°27′07″W / 43.776944°N 88.451944°W / 43.776944; -88.451944 (El Dorado Apartments)
Fond du Lac Highly intact 4-story Neoclassical-styled brick apartment complex, built in 1921 by the Immel Construction Company. Its apartments were modern at the time, with gas stoves, hot and cold running water, telephones and garbage disposals.[34][35]
12 End of the Trail
End of the Trail
August 29, 1980
(#80000136)
Madison St. (Shaler Park)
43°38′17″N 88°43′50″W / 43.638056°N 88.730556°W / 43.638056; -88.730556 (End of the Trail)
Waupun Bronze-cast statue of a Native American warrior slumped on his horse, commissioned by Clarence Shaler and created by James Earle Fraser in 1929.[36][37]
13 First Baptist Church of Fond du Lac
First Baptist Church of Fond du Lac
December 29, 1986
(#86003522)
90 S. Macy St.
43°46′35″N 88°26′53″W / 43.776389°N 88.448056°W / 43.776389; -88.448056 (First Baptist Church of Fond du Lac)
Fond du Lac Neo-Gothic styled church with modified cruciform plan, designed by M. O. Pillsbury and built 1906-07 for influential Baptist congregation.[38][39]
14 First Congregational Church
First Congregational Church
September 4, 1979
(#79000077)
220 Ransom St.
43°50′42″N 88°50′26″W / 43.845°N 88.840556°W / 43.845; -88.840556 (First Congregational Church)
Ripon Prominent church building with square corner tower, designed by E. Townsend Mix in Romanesque Revival style and built between 1865 and 1868. This Congregational congregation included settlers from New England and was active early in the abolition movement, the formation of the Republican party, and other progressive causes.[40][41]
15 Edwin H. Galloway House
Edwin H. Galloway House
May 28, 1976
(#76000060)
336 E. Pioneer Rd.
43°45′17″N 88°26′07″W / 43.754722°N 88.435278°W / 43.754722; -88.435278 (Edwin H. Galloway House)
Fond du Lac Italianate mansion with 3-story tower, begun by Selim Newton in 1846, and greatly expanded by Galloway from 1868 to 1880. Galloway was involved in lumber, real estate, banking, and served in the state assembly.[42][43] Now a museum.
16 John Scott Horner House
John Scott Horner House
September 27, 1984
(#84003672)
336 Scott St.
43°50′44″N 88°50′01″W / 43.845556°N 88.833611°W / 43.845556; -88.833611 (John Scott Horner House)
Ripon Simplified Italianate house built around 1860 with walls of limestone masonry. Horner was a founder of Ripon, who had been governor of Michigan Territory and secretary of Wisconsin Territory.[44][45]
17 Hotel Calumet
Hotel Calumet
March 20, 1992
(#92000111)
170 Forest Ave.
43°46′37″N 88°27′11″W / 43.776944°N 88.453056°W / 43.776944; -88.453056 (Hotel Calumet)
Fond du Lac 3-story simple Neoclassical hotel built between 1902 and 1907 and expanded 1920-22. This hotel was a railroad hotel, largely serving travelers from the Chicago & Northwestern depot next door.[46][47]
18 Hotel Retlaw
Hotel Retlaw
September 7, 1984
(#84003673)
15 E. Division St.
43°46′46″N 88°26′02″W / 43.779444°N 88.433889°W / 43.779444; -88.433889 (Hotel Retlaw)
Fond du Lac 8-story hotel designed in Neoclassical style by Herbert Tullgren, built in 1922-23 with a steel frame clad in brick and stone, and later added on to. A first-class hotel, the Retlaw hosted Eleanor Roosevelt, Gene Autry, JFK, and other notables.[48][49]
19 Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 89
Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 89
April 6, 2015
(#15000137)
203 W. Division St.
43°48′27″N 88°40′37″W / 43.8075°N 88.677°W / 43.8075; -88.677 (Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 89)
Rosendale IOOF Lodge built in 1891, and used as meeting hall and for basketball games, plays, and dinners. Now houses the Rosendale Historical Society.[50]
20 Kendall-Blankenburg House
Kendall-Blankenburg House
April 18, 2002
(#02000381)
47 Sixth St.
43°46′20″N 88°26′43″W / 43.772169°N 88.445281°W / 43.772169; -88.445281 (Kendall-Blankenburg House)
Fond du Lac Second Empire-styled house with mansard roof and high limestone foundation, built in 1874 by Charles Kendall, a Civil War veteran and painter. Around 1890 Albert Blankenburg, who owned a furniture store, added the ell with Stick style decoration.[51][52]
21 Linden Street Historic District
Linden Street Historic District
April 26, 2002
(#02000418)
253-295 and 274-304 Linden St.
43°46′22″N 88°26′54″W / 43.772778°N 88.448333°W / 43.772778; -88.448333 (Linden Street Historic District)
Fond du Lac Small residential neighborhood just SW of downtown,[53] including the 1856 Brown Octagon house,[54] the 1867 early Italianate Pierce house,[55] the 1885 late Italianate Treleven house,[56] the 1904 Queen Anne-styled Mieklejohn house,[57] and the 1910 Craftsman Karstens house.[58]
22 Little White Schoolhouse
Little White Schoolhouse
August 14, 1973
(#73000079)
SE corner of Blackburn and Blossom Sts.
43°50′38″N 88°50′11″W / 43.843889°N 88.836389°W / 43.843889; -88.836389 (Little White Schoolhouse)
Ripon Reputed birthplace of the U.S. Republican Party, born from an anti-slavery meeting in 1854. Greek Revival-styled one-room school built in 1853.[59][60]
23 Longfellow School
Longfellow School
April 14, 1997
(#97000325)
221 Spaulding Ave.
43°50′53″N 88°50′00″W / 43.848056°N 88.833333°W / 43.848056; -88.833333 (Longfellow School)
Ripon 2-story Collegiate Gothic elementary school designed by Auler, Jensen and Brown and built 1927-28.[59][61]
24 Moose Temple
Moose Temple
April 22, 1993
(#93000340)
17-23 Forest Ave.
43°46′39″N 88°26′51″W / 43.7775°N 88.4475°W / 43.7775; -88.4475 (Moose Temple)
Fond du Lac 3.5-story brick Neoclassical building designed by Frank Stepnoski and built around 1923, originally with stores and a barber shop on the first floor and Moose chambers and auditorium above.[62][63]
25 North Main Street Historic District
North Main Street Historic District
March 6, 2002
(#02000149)
Roughly along Main St., from Merrill to Sheboygan
43°46′53″N 88°26′49″W / 43.781389°N 88.446944°W / 43.781389; -88.446944 (North Main Street Historic District)
Fond du Lac Part of Fond du Lac's old downtown, including the 1852 Greek Revival Schmidt Sample Room,[64] where Carrie Nation smashed a whiskey bottle with her hatchet in 1902, the 1876 Italianate Radford-Reinig block,[65] and the 1925 Classical Revival/Beaux Arts Fischer Theater.[66][67]
26 Octagon House
Octagon House
November 3, 1972
(#72000051)
276 Linden St.
43°46′16″N 88°26′54″W / 43.771111°N 88.448333°W / 43.771111; -88.448333 (Octagon House)
Fond du Lac 1.5 story octagon house with grout walls designed by Orson Fowler and built around 1856 by Isaac Brown, an early builder and first mayor of Fond du Lac.[68][69]
27 Marcellus Pedrick House
Marcellus Pedrick House
September 29, 1976
(#76000061)
515 Ransom Ave.
43°50′27″N 88°50′23″W / 43.840833°N 88.839722°W / 43.840833; -88.839722 (Marcellus Pedrick House)
Ripon This Italianate house constructed around 1858 appears to be the earliest house with walls of concrete block in the state. Pedrick, a mason, constructed it himself.[70][71]
28 William and Annie McDermott House
William and Annie McDermott House
September 10, 2014
(#14000616)
109 S. Park Ave.
43°46′33″N 88°26′20″W / 43.7757°N 88.4388°W / 43.7757; -88.4388 (William and Annie McDermott House)
Fond du Lac 2.5 story fine Queen Anne-styled home with porte-cochère built in 1899. William was a real estate developer and philanthropist, pushing for creation of what is now McDermott Park.[72][73]
29 Pipe Site
Pipe Site
December 22, 1978
(#78000095)
NE of Fond du Lac in Pipe
Coordinates missing
Fond du Lac / Pipe
30 Raube Road Site
Raube Road Site
June 4, 1992
(#92000589)
Address Restricted
43°43′49″N 88°43′53″W / 43.730278°N 88.731389°W / 43.730278; -88.731389 (Raube Road Site)
Springvale Two segments of the old Military Road built around 1835, which linked Fort Howard (Green Bay) with Fort Crawford (Prairie du Chien).[74]
31 The Recording Angel
The Recording Angel
July 15, 1974
(#74000088)
Forest Mound Cemetery, N. Madison St.
43°38′20″N 88°44′01″W / 43.638889°N 88.733611°W / 43.638889; -88.733611 (The Recording Angel)
Waupun Bronze sculpture of an angel holding the Book of Life, created by Lorado Taft around 1923. Given by the Shalers for the whole cemetery.[75][76]
32 Ripon College Historic District
Ripon College Historic District
June 2, 1995
(#95000679)
Jct. of Seward and Elm Sts.
43°50′39″N 88°50′34″W / 43.844167°N 88.842778°W / 43.844167; -88.842778 (Ripon College Historic District)
Ripon The older buildings of Ripon College, including the Greek Revival/Italianate East Hall, built 1851-1863 (pictured),[77] the 1865 Romanesque Revival First Congregational Church,[40] the 1930 Neoclassical Lane Library,[78] and the 1940 Georgian Revival Merriman house.[79][80]
33 Saint John Evangelical Lutheran Church
Saint John Evangelical Lutheran Church
April 15, 1986
(#86000794)
670 County Trunk Hwy. S
43°33′52″N 88°10′59″W / 43.564444°N 88.183056°W / 43.564444; -88.183056 (Saint John Evangelical Lutheran Church)
New Fane Rural Gothic-styled fieldstone church with angle buttresses, built around 1871.[81]
34 St. Mary School Upload image
May 1, 2017
(#100000948)
63 E. Merrill Ave.
43°46′52″N 88°26′40″W / 43.780977°N 88.444321°W / 43.780977; -88.444321 (St. Mary School)
Fond du Lac Contemporary Style 2-story school clad in limestone, designed by Frank & Sylvester Stepnoski of Fond du Lac and built in 1949.[82][83]
35 Sisson's Peony Gardens
Sisson's Peony Gardens
December 22, 2006
(#06001193)
207 N. Main St.
43°48′33″N 88°40′32″W / 43.809167°N 88.675556°W / 43.809167; -88.675556 (Sisson's Peony Gardens)
Rosendale Peony nursery and display garden established by Wilbur Sisson around 1920, with a fieldstone windmill built by Jesse Phillips. Now rehabilitated by the Rosendale Historical Society.[84][85]
36 South Main Street Historic District
South Main Street Historic District
March 11, 1993
(#93000160)
Roughly, 71-213 S. Main St.
43°46′32″N 88°26′48″W / 43.775556°N 88.446667°W / 43.775556; -88.446667 (South Main Street Historic District)
Fond du Lac South end of the old downtown, including the 1875 Italianate Frieberg Grocery,[86] the 1890 High Victorian Gothic Carstens' Meat Market,[87] the 1903 Richardsonian Romanesque Commercial National Bank,[88] the 1912 Neoclassical Citizens State Bank,[89] and the 1923 Commercial-style Commercial National Bank,[90][91]
37 Southwest Historic District
Southwest Historic District
June 22, 2004
(#04000653)
115 Belleville, parts of Grove,Lincoln,Newbury,Oak, Ransom, W. Sullivan, Thorne, Watertown, and Watson St., and Woodside
43°50′19″N 88°50′28″W / 43.838611°N 88.841111°W / 43.838611; -88.841111 (Southwest Historic District)
Ripon Large residential district[92] including the 1853 Greek Revival Walcott house,[93] the 1866 Italianate Akin house,[94] the 1875 Second Empire Manville house,[95] the 1886 Queen Anne Mead house,[96] the 1909 Craftsman Higby house,[97] the 1913 Georgian Revival Strauss house,[98] the 1912 Colonial Revival Higby house,[99] the 1921 Dutch Colonial Revival Faustman house,[100] and the 1930 Tudor Revival Griffith house.[101]
38 St. John the Baptist Catholic Church
St. John the Baptist Catholic Church
October 29, 1980
(#80000137)
Off WI Q
43°52′36″N 88°17′26″W / 43.876667°N 88.290556°W / 43.876667; -88.290556 (St. John the Baptist Catholic Church)
Johnsburg Romanesque-styled Catholic church built of limestone from the surrounding fields, with a prominent steeple and spire, begun in 1857 and added to in 1892. The community is so strongly German that the language was used in services until 1948.[102][103]
39 St. Matthias Mission
St. Matthias Mission
October 13, 1988
(#88001838)
1081 County Trunk S
43°34′44″N 88°10′29″W / 43.578889°N 88.174722°W / 43.578889; -88.174722 (St. Matthias Mission)
New Fane Rural Catholic church in Carpenter Gothic style, built by immigrants from Bengel, Prussia in 1861, with tower added in 1888. With adjacent cemetery.[104][105]
40 St. Peter's Episcopal Church
St. Peter's Episcopal Church
December 31, 1974
(#74000089)
217 Houston St.
43°50′39″N 88°50′03″W / 43.844167°N 88.834167°W / 43.844167; -88.834167 (St. Peter's Episcopal Church)
Ripon Carpenter Gothic-styled church clad in board and batten, built in 1860 by the local Episcopal congregation.[106][107]
41 Montgomery and Nancy Tallmadge House
Montgomery and Nancy Tallmadge House
April 18, 2002
(#02000382)
225 Sheboygan St.
43°46′47″N 88°26′18″W / 43.779722°N 88.438333°W / 43.779722; -88.438333 (Montgomery and Nancy Tallmadge House)
Fond du Lac 2-story front-gabled brick Italianate/Greek Revival house built in 1875. The Tallmadges were New Yorkers who farmed in the town of Fond du Lac until they retired to this house in town.[108][109]
42 Tygert Street Historic District
Tygert Street Historic District
February 18, 2011
(#11000020)
Tygert St. and Spaulding Ave., generally bounded by Scott St. and E. Lane St.
43°50′51″N 88°50′04″W / 43.8475°N 88.834444°W / 43.8475; -88.834444 (Tygert Street Historic District)
Ripon Residential neighborhood developed partly by John Scott Horner,[110] including the 1852 Eggleston/Brown house,[111] the 1854 Colonial Revival Northrup-Dellinger-Cowan house,[112] the 1857 Second Empire Henton house,[113] the 1866 Italianate Fowler house,[114] the 1895 Queen Anne Mason house,[115] the 1907 Dutch Colonial Revival Heiman house,[116] the 1915 Behm Bungalow,[117] the 1921 Craftsman Huibregtse house,[118] and the 1935 Tudor Revival Krause house.[119]
43 Wallace-Jagdfeld Octagon House
Wallace-Jagdfeld Octagon House
April 26, 2002
(#02000416)
171 Forest Ave.
43°46′44″N 88°27′13″W / 43.778889°N 88.453611°W / 43.778889; -88.453611 (Wallace-Jagdfeld Octagon House)
Fond du Lac 2-story octagon house with Italianate details and tower, built around 1857. Norman Wallace was a local jeweler. Casper Jagdfeld owned the Northwestern Railroad Hotel.[120][121]
44 Watson Street Commercial Historic District
Watson Street Commercial Historic District
September 27, 1991
(#91001396)
Roughly, Watson St. from Seward to Jackson Sts. and Jackson and Scott Sts. from Watson to Blackburn Sts.
43°50′41″N 88°50′18″W / 43.844722°N 88.838333°W / 43.844722; -88.838333 (Watson Street Commercial Historic District)
Ripon Most of Ripon's old downtown,[122] including the 1860/1890 Dodge and Manville Carriage Works,[123] the 1870 Wolcott and Kinsbury Jewelry Store,[124] the 1872 Italianate Pettibone dry goods store,[125] the 1905 Neoclassical Ripon Public Library,[126] the 1922 20th-Century Commercial-styled Kohl Hardware Company,[127] and the 1930 Art Deco First National Bank.[128]
45 Waupun Post Office
Waupun Post Office
October 24, 2000
(#00001262)
400 E. Franklin St.
43°38′04″N 88°43′46″W / 43.634444°N 88.729444°W / 43.634444; -88.729444 (Waupun Post Office)
Waupun 1932 Neoclassical-styled U.S. post office, red brick with limestone trim, with a relief carving of an eagle above the center doorway.[129][130]
46 Jacob Woodruff House
Jacob Woodruff House
December 30, 1974
(#74000090)
610 Liberty St.
43°50′52″N 88°50′49″W / 43.847778°N 88.846944°W / 43.847778; -88.846944 (Jacob Woodruff House)
Ripon Octagon house begun in 1850, with grout walls, a large bay window, and widow's walk. Woodruff was a blacksmith from Connecticut who joined the Ceresco Phalanx. He was also an abolitionist and helped found Wisconsin's Republican Party.[131][132]
47 Zion Congregational Church
Zion Congregational Church
February 1, 2006
(#05001579)
N4042 Amity Rd.
43°41′28″N 88°47′45″W / 43.691111°N 88.795833°W / 43.691111; -88.795833 (Zion Congregational Church)
Alto Congregational church built in 1858 by Dutch immigrants, with limestone walls, Greek Revival styling, and cemetery.[133][134]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The latitude and longitude information provided is primarily from the National Register Information System, and has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. For 1%, the location info may be way off. We seek to correct the coordinate information wherever it is found to be erroneous. Please leave a note in the Discussion page for this article if you believe any specific location is incorrect.
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on May 19, 2017.
  3. ^ Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  4. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-24). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  5. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  6. ^ "Aetna Station #5". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-10. 
  7. ^ Cleary, Richard L. (1976-06-21). "Aetna Station #5" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-10. 
  8. ^ "Baptist Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-10. 
  9. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2006-04-06). "Baptist Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-10. 
  10. ^ "Brandon Village Hall and Library". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  11. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2006-10-13). "Brandon Village Hall and Library" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  12. ^ "Ceresco Site". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  13. ^ Engel, Charlene Stant (1974-07-23). "Ceresco Site" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  14. ^ "Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  15. ^ "Club Harbor". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  16. ^ Mueller, Patricia (June 1979). "Club Harbor" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  17. ^ "William I. Cole House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-16. 
  18. ^ "George and Mary Agnes Dana House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  19. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-05-07). "Dana, George and Mary Agnes, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  20. ^ "East Division Street - Sheboygan Street Historic District". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  21. ^ Lehrke, Jennifer L. (2009-10-01). "East Division Street - Sheboygan Street Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  22. ^ "Hamilton House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  23. ^ "John Pierron House / Clark S. Matteson". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  24. ^ "Jacob and Charlotte Huber House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  25. ^ "Milton and Helen Simmons House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  26. ^ "Henry Boyle House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  27. ^ "Joseph Longua House / Joseph & Clara Helz". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  28. ^ "Edward H. Lyons House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  29. ^ "Cecilia and Charles Snow House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  30. ^ "Emma Gerhard House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  31. ^ "Hans & Anna Kraut". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  32. ^ "Louise and Rudolph Ebert House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  33. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-08-01). "Ebert, Rudolph and Louise, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  34. ^ "El Dorado Apartments". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-29. 
  35. ^ Heggland, Timothy F. (1991-06-12). "El Dorado Apartments" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  36. ^ ""End of the Trail" sculpture". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-29. 
  37. ^ Shoptaugh, Terry L. (1980-03-19). "End of the Trail" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  38. ^ "First Baptist Church of Fond du Lac". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  39. ^ Neer, Bill; Adams, Peter (1986-04-03). "First Baptist Church of Fond du Lac" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  40. ^ a b "First Congregational Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  41. ^ Maitland, Mrs. Margaret (1978-12-05). "First Congregational Church of Ripon" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  42. ^ "Edwin H. Galloway House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-08. 
  43. ^ Hundt, Katherine E. (1975-12-19). "Galloway, Edwin H., House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-08. 
  44. ^ "John Scott Horner House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-08. 
  45. ^ King, Beverly J. (Mrs. Alfred D.) (1984-01-14). "Horner, John Scott, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-08. 
  46. ^ "Hotel Calumet". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-13. 
  47. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (1989-12-21). "Hotel Calumet" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-13. 
  48. ^ "Hotel Retlaw". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-13. 
  49. ^ Heggland, Timothy F.; Rankin, Katherine H. (1984-05-18). "Hotel Retlaw" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-13. 
  50. ^ "Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge No. 89". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-13. 
  51. ^ "Kendall-Blankenburg House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-19. 
  52. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-07-10). "Kendall-Blankenburg House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-19. 
  53. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-05-01). "Linden Street Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  54. ^ "Octagon House (Isaac Brown House)". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  55. ^ "Calvin Pierce House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  56. ^ "Levi & Georgia Treleven House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  57. ^ "Warren Mieklejohn House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  58. ^ "Charles & Paula Karstens House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  59. ^ a b "Little White Schoolhouse". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  60. ^ Levy, Benjamin (1973-11-08). "Little White Schoolhouse; "Birthplace of the Republican Party"" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  61. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (1995-09-13). "Longfellow School" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-24. 
  62. ^ "Moose Temple". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-27. 
  63. ^ Heggland, Timothy F. (1992-02-07). "Moose Temple" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-27. 
  64. ^ "Schmidt's Sample Room". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  65. ^ "Radford-Reinig block". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  66. ^ "Fischer's Fond du Lac". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  67. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-08-21). "North Main Street Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  68. ^ "Octagon House (Isaac Brown House)". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-27. 
  69. ^ Anderson, Donald N. (1972-06-14). "Octagon House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-27. 
  70. ^ "Marcellus Pedrick House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  71. ^ Cleary, Richard L. (1975-12-19). "Pedrick, Marcellus, house" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  72. ^ "McDermott, William and Annie, House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-06. 
  73. ^ "McDermott, William and Annie, House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-06. 
  74. ^ "Raube Road Historical Site". County Parks. Fond du Lac County. Retrieved 2014-08-22. 
  75. ^ "The Recording Angel". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-03-31. 
  76. ^ Anderson, Donald N. (1974-01-09). "The Recording Angel" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-06. 
  77. ^ "East Hall". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  78. ^ "Lane Library". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  79. ^ "Merriman House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  80. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (1993-09-09). "Ripon College Historical District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  81. ^ McArthur, Shirley du Fresne (1985-10-10). "St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  82. ^ "St. Mary's Catholic School". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2017-05-17. 
  83. ^ "St. Mary's Catholic Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2017-05-17. 
  84. ^ "Sisson's Peony Gardens". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  85. ^ Somerville, Lee (2006-05-23). "Sisson's Peony Gardens" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 
  86. ^ "Otto Frieberg Grocery". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-14. 
  87. ^ "August Carstens Meat Market". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-14. 
  88. ^ "Commercial National Bank". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-14. 
  89. ^ "Citizen's State Bank". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-14. 
  90. ^ "Commercial National Bank". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-14. 
  91. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (1991-10-01). "South Main Street Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-14. 
  92. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2003-07-31). "Southwest Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  93. ^ "Jeremiah & Caroline Wolcott House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  94. ^ "Dennis W. Akin". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  95. ^ "Edwin & Caroline Manville House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  96. ^ "Hiram & Albina Mead House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  97. ^ "Louise Higby House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  98. ^ "Irvin F. Strauss". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  99. ^ "Kenneth & Mary Higby House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  100. ^ "Carl & Eva Faustman". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  101. ^ "Fred and Hazel Griffith House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-18. 
  102. ^ "St. John the Baptist Catholic Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-22. 
  103. ^ Matucheski, Michael; Filipowicz, Diane H. (1980-03-12). "St. John the Baptist Catholic Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-22. 
  104. ^ "St. Matthias Mission". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-22. 
  105. ^ McArthur, Shirley du Fresne (July 1988). "St. Matthias Mission" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-22. 
  106. ^ "St. Peter's Episcopal Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-22. 
  107. ^ Engel, Charlene Stant (1974-07-10). "St. Peter's Episcopal Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-22. 
  108. ^ "Montgomery and Nancy Tallmadge House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  109. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-05-30). "Tallmadge, Montgomery and Nancy, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  110. ^ "Tygert Street Historic District". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  111. ^ "S. Eggleston/Lydia Brown". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  112. ^ "E.L. Northrup; George Dellinger; Charles Cowan". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  113. ^ "Henry Henton". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  114. ^ "David Fowler". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  115. ^ "Mrs. E. Mason". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  116. ^ "Julius & Sophia Heiman". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  117. ^ "Edward & Della Behm". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  118. ^ "S. Edward & Jennie Huibregtse". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  119. ^ "Krause". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-25. 
  120. ^ "Wallace-Jagdfeld Octagon House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  121. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2001-06-14). "Wallace-Jagdfeld Octagon House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  122. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (1989-08-10). "Watson Street Commercial Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  123. ^ "Dodge and Manville Carriage Works". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  124. ^ "Wolcott and Kingsbury Jewelry". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  125. ^ "A.W. Pettibone Block". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  126. ^ "Carnegie Public Library". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  127. ^ "Fred W. Kohl Hardware Store". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  128. ^ "First National Bank". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-04-30. 
  129. ^ "Waupun Post Office". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  130. ^ Causier, Charles W.; Grosse, Robert J. (1993-12-29). "Waupun Post Office" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  131. ^ "Woodruff, Jacob, House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  132. ^ Engel, Charlene Stant (1993-12-29). "Woodruff, Jacob, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  133. ^ "Zion Congregational Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  134. ^ Cartwright, Carol Lohry (2005-08-09). "Zion Congregational Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-05-05.