National Register of Historic Places listings in Morrison County, Minnesota

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Location of Morrison County in Minnesota

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Morrison County, Minnesota. It is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Morrison County, Minnesota, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.[1]

There are 25 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including one National Historic Landmark. A supplementary list includes two additional sites that were formerly on the National Register.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted July 24, 2015.[2]

Current listings[edit]

[3] Name on the Register Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 Ayer Mission Site
Ayer Mission Site
June 18, 1973
(#73000984)
Address Restricted
Belle Prairie Township Site of an 1849 farmhouse and mission school.[5]
2 Belle Prairie Village Site
Belle Prairie Village Site
August 14, 1973
(#73000985)
Address Restricted
Belle Prairie Township Precolumbian village site on the Mississippi River.[5]
3 Bridge No. 4969 Upload image
January 21, 2015
(#14001175)
TH 115 & BNSFRR over Mississippi R.
46°04′28″N 94°20′06″W / 46.0744°N 94.3349°W / 46.0744; -94.3349 (Bridge No. 4969)
Camp Ripley vicinity
4 Burton-Rosenmeier House
Burton-Rosenmeier House
March 13, 1986
(#86000328)
606 1st St., SE.
45°58′15″N 94°21′53″W / 45.970855°N 94.364586°W / 45.970855; -94.364586 (Burton-Rosenmeier House)
Little Falls Little Falls' leading example of Neoclassical architecture, built c. 1900 and owned successively by notable local merchant Barney Burton and attorney/politician Christian Rosenmeier.[6] Now houses the Little Falls Convention and Visitors Bureau.
5 Church of Our Savior-Episcopal
Church of Our Savior-Episcopal
July 17, 1980
(#80002090)
113 4th St., NE.
45°58′36″N 94°21′29″W / 45.976696°N 94.358004°W / 45.976696; -94.358004 (Church of Our Savior-Episcopal)
Little Falls 1903 Tudor Revival church significant as a leading example of Minnesota's second generation of Episcopal churches.[7]
6 Crow Wing State Park
Crow Wing State Park
July 28, 1970
(#70000288)
Off Minnesota Highway 371
46°16′39″N 94°20′40″W / 46.2775°N 94.344444°W / 46.2775; -94.344444 (Crow Wing State Park)
Brainerd vicinity Habitation site at a key travel junction, occupied from Precolumbian times up to the 19th-century town of Old Crow Wing.[5]
7 Fort Duquesne (21-MO-20)
Fort Duquesne (21-MO-20)
November 15, 1984
(#84000452)
Address Restricted
46°00′46″N 94°21′30″W / 46.012671°N 94.358305°W / 46.012671; -94.358305 (Fort Duquesne (21-MO-20))
Little Falls vicinity Site where explorer Joseph Marin de la Malgue wintered c. 1752.[5]
8 Fort Ripley
Fort Ripley
September 10, 1971
(#71000439)
Off Minnesota Highway 115[8]
46°10′32″N 94°22′23″W / 46.175503°N 94.373149°W / 46.175503; -94.373149 (Fort Ripley)
Camp Ripley Military Reservation Site of an 1849 military post—the second ever built in Minnesota—to keep the peace among the Dakota, Ojibwe, and Ho-Chunk.[5]
9 Charles A. Lindbergh House and Park
Charles A. Lindbergh House and Park
November 20, 1970
(#70000303)
1620 Lindbergh Dr. S.
45°57′29″N 94°23′16″W / 45.958043°N 94.387863°W / 45.958043; -94.387863 (Charles A. Lindbergh House and Park)
Little Falls vicinity 1907 house and farm of Congressman Charles August Lindbergh and his son, aviator Charles Lindbergh.[9] Now a state park and Minnesota Historical Society site.[10]
10 Charles A. Lindbergh State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources
Charles A. Lindbergh State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources
October 25, 1989
(#89001655)
Off County Highway 52, south of Little Falls
45°57′27″N 94°23′25″W / 45.957624°N 94.390406°W / 45.957624; -94.390406 (Charles A. Lindbergh State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources)
Little Falls vicinity Park facilities significant as examples of New Deal federal work relief, state park development, and National Park Service rustic design, with six contributing properties built 1938–39.[11]
11 Little Falls Carnegie Library
Little Falls Carnegie Library
November 3, 1980
(#80002091)
108 3rd St., NE.
45°58′36″N 94°21′31″W / 45.976716°N 94.358741°W / 45.976716; -94.358741 (Little Falls Carnegie Library)
Little Falls 1905 Carnegie library noted for its high state of preservation and atypical American Craftsman architecture.[12]
12 Little Falls Commercial Historic District
Little Falls Commercial Historic District
July 22, 1994
(#94000740)
Roughly 1st St., SE. from 1st Ave, SE. to 1st Ave., NE.
45°58′35″N 94°21′45″W / 45.976467°N 94.362596°W / 45.976467; -94.362596 (Little Falls Commercial Historic District)
Little Falls Downtown commercial district reflecting Little Falls' abrupt evolution from an agricultural trade center to a lumber and industrial powerhouse, with 32 contributing properties built 1887–1936.[13]
13 Morrison County Courthouse
Morrison County Courthouse
December 5, 1978
(#78001552)
107 2nd St., SE.
45°58′32″N 94°21′38″W / 45.975581°N 94.36042°W / 45.975581; -94.36042 (Morrison County Courthouse)
Little Falls County courthouse built 1890–91, noted for its impressive Richardsonian Romanesque architecture of local brick and granite.[14]
14 Northern Pacific Railway Depot
Northern Pacific Railway Depot
September 5, 1985
(#85001987)
200 1st St., NW.
45°58′42″N 94°22′11″W / 45.978206°N 94.36982°W / 45.978206; -94.36982 (Northern Pacific Railway Depot)
Little Falls Shingle Style railway station built 1899–1900, one of architect Cass Gilbert's last projects while in Minnesota and a symbol of the highly influential Northern Pacific Railway.[15]
15 Our Lady of the Angels Academy
Our Lady of the Angels Academy
December 28, 2005
(#05001474)
18801 Riverwood Dr.
46°02′05″N 94°20′18″W / 46.034664°N 94.33822°W / 46.034664; -94.33822 (Our Lady of the Angels Academy)
Belle Prairie Township 1911 parochial elementary school building enlarged in 1931, a local example of the nationally influential Catholic school system and anchor of the Belle Prairie community.[16]
16 Pelkey Lake Site
Pelkey Lake Site
October 2, 1973
(#73000986)
Address Restricted
Belle Prairie Township Mounds built between 5000 BCE and 1700 CE.[5]
17 Zebulon Pike's 1805-1806 Wintering Quarters
Zebulon Pike's 1805-1806 Wintering Quarters
July 11, 1988
(#88000538)
Address Restricted
Little Falls vicinity Site of the fortified winter camp of Zebulon Pike's first expedition.[5]
18 Pine Tree Lumber Company Office Building
Pine Tree Lumber Company Office Building
September 5, 1985
(#85001991)
735 1st St., NE.
45°59′04″N 94°21′39″W / 45.984444°N 94.360719°W / 45.984444; -94.360719 (Pine Tree Lumber Company Office Building)
Little Falls 1891 office building, the only intact surviving structure of Frederick Weyerhaeuser's Minnesota lumber company (active 1890–1919), one of the state's largest and the major employer in Little Falls.[17]
19 Rice Lake Prehistoric District
Rice Lake Prehistoric District
October 2, 1973
(#73000987)
Address Restricted
Little Falls vicinity 1000 BCE–1700 CE habitation and mound site.[5]
20 St. Joseph's Church-Catholic
St. Joseph's Church-Catholic
September 5, 1985
(#85001998)
Main St.
45°58′48″N 94°06′12″W / 45.98°N 94.103333°W / 45.98; -94.103333 (St. Joseph's Church-Catholic)
Pierz Gothic Revival church built 1886–88 for a German Catholic community attracted by Father Francis Xavier Pierz in the late 1860s.[18]
21 Stanchfield Logging Camp
Stanchfield Logging Camp
February 12, 1999
(#99000190)
Address Restricted
Camp Ripley Military Reservation[19] Site of an early commercial logging camp, active over the winter of 1847–48.[5]
22 Swan River Village Site
Swan River Village Site
October 2, 1973
(#73000988)
Address Restricted
Little Falls vicinity Site of an Ojibwe village on the Mississippi River, recorded by Joseph Nicollet in 1836.[5]
23 William Warren Two Rivers House Site and Peter McDougall Farmstead
William Warren Two Rivers House Site and Peter McDougall Farmstead
December 7, 1974
(#74001031)
County Road 231
45°50′36″N 94°20′49″W / 45.843333°N 94.346944°W / 45.843333; -94.346944 (William Warren Two Rivers House Site and Peter McDougall Farmstead)
Royalton vicinity 1874 farmstead on the site of William Whipple Warren's c. 1847 trading post.[5]
24 Charles A. Weyerhaeuser and Musser Houses
Charles A. Weyerhaeuser and Musser Houses
September 5, 1985
(#85001990)
Highland Ave.
45°58′15″N 94°21′59″W / 45.970723°N 94.366361°W / 45.970723; -94.366361 (Charles A. Weyerhaeuser and Musser Houses)
Little Falls Adjoining 1898 houses of second-generation lumber magnates, symbolizing the Minnesota lumber industry and its domination by a few powerful individuals.[20] Now Linden Hill Historical Event Center.[21]
25 Almond A. White House
Almond A. White House
March 13, 1986
(#86000330)
Cleveland and Beaulieu Sts.
46°20′10″N 94°38′28″W / 46.336214°N 94.641111°W / 46.336214; -94.641111 (Almond A. White House)
Motley 1902 house with a four-story tower, noted for its prominent and locally unusual Queen Anne architecture.[22]

Former listings[edit]

[3] Name on the Register Image Date listed Date removed Location City or town Summary
1 O. A. Churchill Store Upload image
September 5, 1985
(#85001988)
May 7, 1990
55 Bay St.
Little Falls Long the oldest commercial building in Central Minnesota, built in 1855. Demolished in 1988.[23]
2 Clough Township Hall Upload image
September 8, 1985
(#85001985)
September 29, 2004
CR 206
Randall vicinity 1922 Classical Revival meeting hall sided with sheet metal embossed to look like stone.[5] Moved in 2001.[24]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The latitude and longitude information provided in this table was derived originally from the National Register Information System, which has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. For about 1% of NRIS original coordinates, experience has shown that one or both coordinates are typos or otherwise extremely far off; some corrections may have been made. A more subtle problem causes many locations to be off by up to 150 yards, depending on location in the country: most NRIS coordinates were derived from tracing out latitude and longitudes off of USGS topographical quadrant maps created under the North American Datum of 1927, which differs from the current, highly accurate WGS84 GPS system used by most on-line maps. Chicago is about right, but NRIS longitudes in Washington are higher by about 4.5 seconds, and are lower by about 2.0 seconds in Maine. Latitudes differ by about 1.0 second in Florida. Some locations in this table may have been corrected to current GPS standards.
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on July 24, 2015.
  3. ^ a b Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  4. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Nord, Mary Ann (2003). The National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Society. ISBN 0-87351-448-3. 
  6. ^ Jenkinson, Thomas L.; Norene Roberts (1985-03-20). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Barney Burton – Christian Rosenmeier House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-11. 
  7. ^ Nelson, Charles; Charles Skrief (1980-03-12). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Church of Our Savior" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-11. 
  8. ^ Location given at "Fort Ripley". Minnesota National Register Properties Database. Minnesota Historical Society. 2009. Retrieved 2014-01-11.  NRIS lists site as "address restricted".
  9. ^ Grossman, John (1970-03-31). "National Register of Historic Places – Nomination Form: Lindbergh, Charles A., State Park and Lindbergh House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-09. 
  10. ^ "Charles A. Lindbergh Historic Site". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  11. ^ Anderson, Rolf T. (1988-09-09). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Charles A. Lindbergh State Park WPA/Rustic Style Historic Resources" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-09. 
  12. ^ Nelson, Charles W.; Charles W. Skrief (1980-03-10). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Little Falls Carnegie Library" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  13. ^ Granger, Susan et al. "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Little Falls Commercial Historic District" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  14. ^ Warner, Jan (1978-03-07). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory -- Nomination Form: Morrison County Courthouse" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  15. ^ Jenkinson, Thomas L.; Norene Roberts (1985-03-20). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Northern Pacific Railway Depot" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  16. ^ Fraser, Clayton B. (2005-05-30). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Our Lady of the Angels Academy" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2013-11-09. 
  17. ^ Jenkinson, Thomas L.; Norene Roberts (1985-03-20). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Pine Tree Lumber Company Office Building" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-06. 
  18. ^ Jenkinson, Thomas L.; Norene Roberts (1985-03-20). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: St. Joseph's Church" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-03. 
  19. ^ "Stanchfield Logging Camp". Minnesota National Register Properties Database. Minnesota Historical Society. 2009. Retrieved 2014-01-11. 
  20. ^ Jenkinson, Thomas L.; Norene Roberts (1985-03-20). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Charles A.- Weyerhaeuser and Richard Drew Musser Houses" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-03. 
  21. ^ "Linden Hill Historical Event Center". 2013. Retrieved 2014-01-11. 
  22. ^ Jenkinson, Thomas L.; Norene Roberts (1985-03-20). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Almond A. White House" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2014-01-03. 
  23. ^ El-Hai, Jack (2000). Lost Minnesota: Stories of Vanished Places. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 0816635153. 
  24. ^ "Changes to the National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota, 2003-2010". Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office. 2011-02-01. Retrieved 2013-03-01. 

External links[edit]