National Register of Historic Places listings in Sauk County, Wisconsin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Location of Sauk County in Wisconsin

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Sauk County, Wisconsin. It is intended to provide a comprehensive listing of entries in the National Register of Historic Places that are located in Sauk County, Wisconsin. The locations of National Register properties for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below may be seen in a map.[1]

There are 56 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county. Three of these are further designated as National Historic Landmarks.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted June 1, 2018.[2]
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap · Google Maps
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Current listings[edit]

[3] Name on the Register[4] Image Date listed[5] Location City or town Description
1 Baraboo Public Library
Baraboo Public Library
September 14, 1981
(#81000058)
230 4th Ave.
43°28′16″N 89°44′44″W / 43.471111°N 89.745556°W / 43.471111; -89.745556 (Baraboo Public Library)
Baraboo 1903 Carnegie library designed in Neoclassical style by Louis Claude. Served the workers at Badger Ordnance during World War II, and still serves the community.[6]
2 Chicago and North Western Depot
Chicago and North Western Depot
December 26, 1984
(#84000639)
240 Railroad St.
43°31′49″N 90°00′27″W / 43.530278°N 90.0075°W / 43.530278; -90.0075 (Chicago and North Western Depot)
Reedsburg 1905 red brick depot of Chicago and North Western Railway with a Classical Revival entry.[7] At this site in 1873 a crowd of Reedsburg locals protested the deportation of a local Ho-Chunk family to Nebraska.[8]
3 City Hotel
City Hotel
December 26, 1984
(#84000642)
125 Main St.
43°31′57″N 90°00′33″W / 43.5325°N 90.009167°W / 43.5325; -90.009167 (City Hotel)
Reedsburg Red brick hotel built in 1886 in Second Empire style by Abner Harris' building company for German immigrant William Roper, who operated the hotel.[9]
4 William Clark House
William Clark House
April 8, 1980
(#80000193)
320 Walnut St.
43°27′48″N 89°44′27″W / 43.463333°N 89.740833°W / 43.463333; -89.740833 (William Clark House)
Baraboo Second Empire styled house with mansard roof built in mid-1800s. Clark was an engineer[10] for the C&NW.
5 J. W. Corwith Livery
J. W. Corwith Livery
April 20, 2004
(#84004018)
121 S. Webb Ave.
43°31′54″N 90°00′34″W / 43.531667°N 90.009444°W / 43.531667; -90.009444 (J. W. Corwith Livery)
Reedsburg Livery stable, built in 1911 near the hotels and the depot, where a traveler could rent a horse and buggy or board a horse. Only a few livery buildings are left in the state.[7][11]
6 August W. Derleth House
August W. Derleth House
April 30, 1991
(#91000468)
S10431a Lueders Rd.
43°15′59″N 89°44′26″W / 43.266288°N 89.74061°W / 43.266288; -89.74061 (August W. Derleth House)
Sauk City Derleth built this home from local limestone near his beloved Wisconsin River about 1939 to house his books and his writing career. He called his home Place of Hawks.[12][13]
7 Devil's Lake State Park
Devil's Lake State Park
January 21, 2015
(#14001192)
S5975 Park Rd.
43°25′39″N 89°44′02″W / 43.427492°N 89.733816°W / 43.427492; -89.733816 (Devil's Lake State Park)
Baraboo The lake between two stone bluffs was sacred to Native Americans, who built effigy mounds on its shores. The state park was founded in 1911. The CCCs built most of the rustic structures in the 1930s. Now Wisconsin's largest and most popular state park.[14]
8 Downtown Baraboo Historic District
Downtown Baraboo Historic District
June 8, 2015
(#15000340)
Roughly bounded by 5th & 2nd Aves., 5th, Ash, 1st, Oak & Birch Sts.
43°28′13″N 89°44′39″W / 43.470393°N 89.744265°W / 43.470393; -89.744265 (Downtown Baraboo Historic District)
Baraboo Concentration of 75 commercial and civic buildings[15] including the 1872 Italianate Draper Brothers Meat Market,[16] the 1873 Moeller Wagon Shop,[17] the 1885 Ewing Livery,[18] the 1888 Miller Saloon,[19] the 1896 Civil War Memorial,[20] the 1896 Romanesque Revival First Methodist Episcopal Church,[21] the 1900 Romanesque Wellington Hotel,[22] the 1907 Baraboo Steam Laundry,[23] the 1922 Colonial Revival Trimpey Building,[24] the 1928 Prairie Style Baraboo High School,[25] and the 1938 Art Moderne Juliar Theatre.[26]
9 Durst-Bloedau Site
Durst-Bloedau Site
December 19, 1978
(#78000137)
North of Leland
Address Restricted

Leland 50 foot long rock shelter, in which Archaic and later points have been found.[27]
10 Freethinkers' Hall
Freethinkers' Hall
March 31, 1988
(#88000237)
309 Polk St.
43°16′34″N 89°43′28″W / 43.276111°N 89.724444°W / 43.276111; -89.724444 (Freethinkers' Hall)
Sauk City 1884 meeting hall designed by Alfred Clas. The Freethinkers' congregation was formed by German immigrants in 1852, and meets to this day, the last such congregation in North America.[28]
11 Gust Brothers' Store
Gust Brothers' Store
August 5, 2002
(#02000834)
101 Fourth St.
43°28′16″N 89°44′32″W / 43.471111°N 89.742222°W / 43.471111; -89.742222 (Gust Brothers' Store)
Baraboo 1877 limestone commercial building, with Italianate features. Originally a meat market, it later housed banks and offices.[29]
12 Edward M. Hackett House
Edward M. Hackett House
December 26, 1984
(#84000644)
612 E. Main St.
43°31′56″N 90°00′08″W / 43.532222°N 90.002222°W / 43.532222; -90.002222 (Edward M. Hackett House)
Reedsburg High Victorian Gothic home built 1877-78 by Edward M. Hackett, a local lumberman, builder and architect.[7][30]
13 Otto Sr. and Lisette Hahn House
Otto Sr. and Lisette Hahn House
January 4, 2012
(#11001015)
626 Water St.
43°16′26″N 89°43′13″W / 43.273783°N 89.720169°W / 43.273783; -89.720169 (Otto Sr. and Lisette Hahn House)
Sauk City Red brick house built between 1850 and 1857. Hahn, an immigrant harness-maker bought the house in 1866 and built a workshop next to it. After his wife Lisette died in 1871, he raised the children in the house.[31]
14 Abner L. Harris House
Abner L. Harris House
December 26, 1984
(#84000649)
226 N. Pine St.
43°31′58″N 90°00′13″W / 43.532778°N 90.003611°W / 43.532778; -90.003611 (Abner L. Harris House)
Reedsburg Three story Second Empire house built around 1873. Harris was postmaster, mayor, merchant and promoter of Reedsburg.[7]
15 Harrisburg School
Harrisburg School
March 24, 2015
(#15000109)
E7646 Cty. Rd. B
43°15′23″N 89°56′22″W / 43.256364°N 89.939463°W / 43.256364; -89.939463 (Harrisburg School)
Troy One-room rural school rebuilt in 1890s on site of an 1856 school. Served as a school until 1955, when it closed for school consolidation.[32][33]
16 Honey Creek Swiss Rural Historic District
Honey Creek Swiss Rural Historic District
April 6, 1990
(#89000484)
SE of Prairie du Sac
43°18′10″N 89°51′08″W / 43.302778°N 89.852222°W / 43.302778; -89.852222 (Honey Creek Swiss Rural Historic District)
Prairie du Sac Rural area settled chiefly by immigrants from Graubünden canton, Switzerland starting in 1842. Some characteristic stone and timber-framed buildings remain.[34]
17 Hulburt Creek Garden Beds
Hulburt Creek Garden Beds
August 8, 1991
(#91000958)
Birchwood Road near CTH H
43°37′08″N 89°49′38″W / 43.61891°N 89.827092°W / 43.61891; -89.827092 (Hulburt Creek Garden Beds)
Delton Raised garden beds built around 1000 AD. The oldest radio-carbon dated ridged fields in the upper Midwest.[35]
18 Island Woolen Company Office Building
Island Woolen Company Office Building
August 18, 2011
(#11000559)
900 2nd Ave.
43°28′10″N 89°45′24″W / 43.469444°N 89.756667°W / 43.469444; -89.756667 (Island Woolen Company Office Building)
Baraboo Only remaining building from textile mill complex, designed by Claude & Starck in Prairie School style and built 1917-18.[36] In the 1920s, Island Woolen was the biggest employer in Sauk County.[37]
19 Lachmund Family House
Lachmund Family House
March 29, 2000
(#00000257)
717 Water St.
43°16′22″N 89°43′16″W / 43.272778°N 89.721111°W / 43.272778; -89.721111 (Lachmund Family House)
Sauk City Gothic Revival-styled home built in 1861 by Charles Halasz, who founded Lachmund Lumber Company. Now apartments.[38]
20 Aldo Leopold Shack
Aldo Leopold Shack
July 14, 1978
(#78000082)
Levee Rd.
43°33′46″N 89°39′33″W / 43.562778°N 89.659167°W / 43.562778; -89.659167 (Aldo Leopold Shack)
Baraboo vicinity Former chicken coop where conservationist Aldo Leopold wrote much of A Sand County Almanac.
21 Main Street Commercial Historic District
Main Street Commercial Historic District
December 26, 1984
(#84000654)
Roughly bounded by N. Park, S. Park, N. Walnut, and S. Walnut Sts. on Main
43°31′57″N 90°00′25″W / 43.5325°N 90.006944°W / 43.5325; -90.006944 (Main Street Commercial Historic District)
Reedsburg Commercial buildings in various styles, ranging from the 1873 Italianate Kelsey Block to the 1888 Romanesque Revival Free Press Block, to the large 1896 Queen Anne Hotel Stolte, to the 1920 Neoclassical Reedsburg Bank.[39]
22 Man Mound
Man Mound
November 30, 1978
(#78000138)
East of Baraboo off WI 33 on Man Mound Road
43°29′19″N 89°40′15″W / 43.488611°N 89.670833°W / 43.488611; -89.670833 (Man Mound)
Baraboo The only remaining man-shaped effigy mound in the Upper Midwest, built by Late Woodland people between 750 and 1200 AD.[40] Designated a National Historic Landmark in 2016.
23 Manchester Street Bridge
Manchester Street Bridge
October 13, 1988
(#88002005)
Ochsner Park
43°28′13″N 89°45′21″W / 43.470278°N 89.755833°W / 43.470278; -89.755833 (Manchester Street Bridge)
Baraboo Camelback through truss bridge across the Baraboo River, built in 1884 by Milwaukee Bridge and Iron Works.[41] Moved to a park around 1987. Now the last remaining bridge of this type in the state.[42]
24 Marshall Memorial Hall
Marshall Memorial Hall
April 1, 1993
(#93000264)
30 Wisconsin Dells Parkway S.
43°35′20″N 89°47′37″W / 43.588889°N 89.793611°W / 43.588889; -89.793611 (Marshall Memorial Hall)
Lake Delton Small Georgian Revival municipal building built in 1928 with a bequest from Roujet D. Marshall, a Wisconsin Supreme Court justice from the area. The building houses a library, offices and a meeting room.[43]
25 Merrimac Ferry
Merrimac Ferry
December 31, 1974
(#74000330)
WI 113 at the Wisconsin River
43°22′05″N 89°37′26″W / 43.368056°N 89.623889°W / 43.368056; -89.623889 (Merrimac Ferry)
Merrimac Car ferry across the Wisconsin River. Ferries have operated at this site since 1844.[44]
26 Our Lady of Loretto Roman Catholic Church and Cemetery
Our Lady of Loretto Roman Catholic Church and Cemetery
March 9, 1990
(#90000378)
Co. Hwy. C, 1 mi. W of Denzer
43°21′03″N 89°54′17″W / 43.350833°N 89.904722°W / 43.350833; -89.904722 (Our Lady of Loretto Roman Catholic Church and Cemetery)
Honey Creek Gothic Revival church built in 1880 as a mission church for German and Irish settlers. Includes original pews, 1887 pump organ and pot-bellied stove.[45]
27 Park Street Historic District
Park Street Historic District
December 26, 1984
(#84000656)
On N. Park St. roughly bounded by 6th, Locust, N. Pine and Main Sts.
43°32′04″N 90°00′20″W / 43.534444°N 90.005556°W / 43.534444; -90.005556 (Park Street Historic District)
Reedsburg Largely residential district, with homes in various styles built as early as 1870.[7]
28 Seth Peterson Cottage
Seth Peterson Cottage
November 9, 1981
(#81000059)
Dell Ave.
43°33′47″N 89°49′30″W / 43.563056°N 89.825°W / 43.563056; -89.825 (Seth Peterson Cottage)
Lake Delton Small modernist cottage built in 1958, overlooking Mirror Lake. Frank Lloyd Wright's last building in Wisconsin. Now available for rental and tours.[46]
29 Point of Rocks
Point of Rocks
June 11, 2010
(#10000345)
US-12 approximately .85 mi north of Ski Hi Rd. and .25 mi south of STH 159
43°26′09″N 89°46′22″W / 43.435833°N 89.772778°W / 43.435833; -89.772778 (Point of Rocks)
Baraboo Outcrop of Baraboo quartzite. From this and other area outcrops, UW-Madison geologists developed theories on metamorphism, Pre-Cambrian and structural geology.[47]
30 Walworth D. Porter Duplex Residence
Walworth D. Porter Duplex Residence
September 27, 1996
(#96001053)
221-225 7th St.
43°28′27″N 89°44′22″W / 43.474167°N 89.739444°W / 43.474167; -89.739444 (Walworth D. Porter Duplex Residence)
Baraboo Queen Anne duplex built in 1894. Once occupied by Charles Ringling.[48]
31 Raddatz Rockshelter
Raddatz Rockshelter
December 18, 1978
(#78000139)
On CTH C at Natural Bridge State Park
43°20′53″N 89°55′53″W / 43.348084°N 89.931432°W / 43.348084; -89.931432 (Raddatz Rockshelter)
Leland Oldest documented site of human occupation in the upper Midwest, dated to 10,000 to 12,000 years ago.[49]
32 Reedsburg Brewery
Reedsburg Brewery
December 26, 1984
(#84000661)
401 N. Walnut St.
43°32′09″N 90°00′30″W / 43.535833°N 90.008333°W / 43.535833; -90.008333 (Reedsburg Brewery)
Reedsburg A brewery started at this site in 1870, using locally-grown hops. It burned in 1903, was rebuilt in 1905 with 8,000 barrel capacity, and ran until 1950, except during Prohibition. Now apartments.[7]
33 Reedsburg Post Office
Reedsburg Post Office
October 24, 2000
(#00001240)
215 N. Walnut St.
43°32′01″N 90°00′30″W / 43.533611°N 90.008333°W / 43.533611; -90.008333 (Reedsburg Post Office)
Reedsburg Built in 1937, the post office contains a mural "Dairy Farming," painted by Richard Jansen and funded by a New Deal program.[50][51]
34 Reedsburg Woolen Mill Office
Reedsburg Woolen Mill Office
December 26, 1984
(#84000664)
26 Main St.
43°31′56″N 90°00′40″W / 43.532222°N 90.011111°W / 43.532222; -90.011111 (Reedsburg Woolen Mill Office)
Reedsburg The mill converted local wool into products from army blankets to commercial goods for Montgomery Ward and Sears. With 200 employees, it was Reedsburg's largest employer for much of its 80 years,[7] from around 1881 to 1967.[52]
35 Rest Haven Motel
Rest Haven Motel
July 20, 2011
(#11000478)
E5116 US 14
43°11′08″N 90°03′47″W / 43.185556°N 90.063056°W / 43.185556; -90.063056 (Rest Haven Motel)
Spring Green 1952 motel designed by Jesse Caraway, a student of Frank Lloyd Wright.[53] Now the Usonian Inn[54]
36 William Riggert House
William Riggert House
December 26, 1984
(#84000666)
547 S. Park St.
43°31′35″N 90°00′22″W / 43.526389°N 90.006111°W / 43.526389; -90.006111 (William Riggert House)
Reedsburg Riggert, a banker and city leader, had this Queen Anne house built in 1892. It still has a carriage house.[7]
37 Ringling Brothers Circus Headquarters
Ringling Brothers Circus Headquarters
August 4, 1969
(#69000032)
Bounded roughly by Water, Brian, Lynn, and East Sts.
43°28′02″N 89°44′21″W / 43.467194°N 89.739053°W / 43.467194; -89.739053 (Ringling Brothers Circus Headquarters)
Baraboo Winter quarters for the Ringling Brothers Circus from 1884 to 1919, including the Ring Barn for horses and the Elephant House. Now part of Circus World Museum.[55]
38 Al. Ringling Theatre
Al. Ringling Theatre
May 17, 1976
(#76000202)
136 4th Ave.
43°28′16″N 89°44′37″W / 43.471111°N 89.743611°W / 43.471111; -89.743611 (Al. Ringling Theatre)
Baraboo The eldest Ringling brother gave this gift to Baraboo in 1915, an ornate Beaux Arts theater which was one of the first "movie palaces" in the U.S.[56]
39 Albrecht C. Ringling House
Albrecht C. Ringling House
May 17, 1976
(#76000079)
623 Broadway
43°28′25″N 89°44′41″W / 43.473611°N 89.744722°W / 43.473611; -89.744722 (Albrecht C. Ringling House)
Baraboo 1905 Romanesque Revival home of Albrecht and Lou Ringling of the Ringling Brothers Circus. Al was the "circus genius" and Lou started as the snake charmer.[57]
40 Charles Ringling House
Charles Ringling House
March 21, 1997
(#97000268)
201 8th St.
43°28′30″N 89°44′24″W / 43.475°N 89.74°W / 43.475; -89.74 (Charles Ringling House)
Baraboo Neoclassical-styled home built in 1900 of Charles Ringling,[58] operating manager of the Ringling Brothers Circus.
41 Charles and Anna Ruhland House Upload image March 20, 2017
(#100000774)
213 Lynn St.
43°27′55″N 89°44′30″W / 43.465216°N 89.741799°W / 43.465216; -89.741799 (Charles and Anna Ruhland House)
Baraboo Two-story brick Craftsman house, built in 1909.[59] Charles ran a nearby brewery with his father.[60]
42 Salem Evangelical Church
Salem Evangelical Church
March 29, 1988
(#86003576)
Jct. of CR PF and Church Rd.
43°17′59″N 89°50′30″W / 43.299722°N 89.841667°W / 43.299722; -89.841667 (Salem Evangelical Church)
Plain Church of block and stack masonry built in 1875.[61] The congregation formed at the site in 1844 was the focus of the Swiss community. A.k.a. Ragatz Church.[62]
43 Sauk City Fire Station
Sauk City Fire Station
July 28, 1999
(#99000920)
717 John Adams St.
43°16′14″N 89°43′23″W / 43.270556°N 89.723056°W / 43.270556; -89.723056 (Sauk City Fire Station)
Sauk City Firehouse built in 1889, with hose-drying tower added in 1894. Also served as village hall.[38] The volunteer fire department had organized in 1854, the first in the state.[63]
44 Sauk City High School
Sauk City High School
February 23, 1989
(#89000071)
713 Madison St.
43°16′22″N 89°43′33″W / 43.272778°N 89.725833°W / 43.272778; -89.725833 (Sauk City High School)
Sauk City 1916 brick building designed by Alfred Clas in Mission style.[38]
45 Sauk County Courthouse
Sauk County Courthouse
March 9, 1982
(#82000711)
515 Oak St.
43°28′13″N 89°44′35″W / 43.470278°N 89.743056°W / 43.470278; -89.743056 (Sauk County Courthouse)
Baraboo 1905 Classical Revival building designed by Ferry and native-son Clas and built in 1905.[64]
46 Seven Gables
Seven Gables
January 20, 1978
(#78000140)
215 6th St.
43°28′23″N 89°44′23″W / 43.473056°N 89.739722°W / 43.473056; -89.739722 (Seven Gables)
Baraboo Carpenter Gothic home built in 1860 for Terrell Thomas, a Baraboo banker.[65]
47 Spellman Granite Works
Spellman Granite Works
July 14, 2015
(#15000426)
615 Phillips Blvd.
43°16′19″N 89°43′44″W / 43.272039°N 89.728823°W / 43.272039; -89.728823 (Spellman Granite Works)
Sauk City The Spellman brothers ran a stone-finishing business that produced gravestones, urns and statuary from 1917 to 2005.[66]
48 State Bank of Spring Green
State Bank of Spring Green
July 16, 2010
(#10000463)
134 W. Jefferson St.
43°10′36″N 90°04′08″W / 43.176667°N 90.068889°W / 43.176667; -90.068889 (State Bank of Spring Green)
Spring Green 1915 Neoclassical Revival building with terra cotta ornamentation, designed by William Hilgen.[67]
49 Steam Locomotive #1385
Steam Locomotive #1385
May 18, 2000
(#00000524)
E8948 Diamond Hill Rd.
43°27′31″N 89°52′29″W / 43.458611°N 89.874722°W / 43.458611; -89.874722 (Steam Locomotive #1385)
North Freedom Built in 1907, #1385 is the only remaining operable steam locomotive of the Chicago & North Western Railway.[68]
50 William Stolte, Jr., House
William Stolte, Jr., House
December 26, 1984
(#84000667)
432 S. Walnut St.
43°31′44″N 90°00′30″W / 43.528889°N 90.008333°W / 43.528889; -90.008333 (William Stolte, Jr., House)
Reedsburg Queen Anne house built 1899. Stolte Jr. was a partner in the Big Store and was active in civic life and the local Old Settlers Association.[7]
51 William Stolte, Sr., House
William Stolte, Sr., House
December 26, 1984
(#84000670)
444 S. Walnut St.
43°31′43″N 90°00′30″W / 43.528611°N 90.008333°W / 43.528611; -90.008333 (William Stolte, Sr., House)
Reedsburg Stolte Sr. built the house in the 1880s, mixing the styles of Victorian Gothic and Queen Anne. A smokehouse and hitching post are in the back yard. Stolte built the hotel at 204 Main.[7]
52 Thompson House Hotel
Thompson House Hotel
December 22, 1997
(#97001583)
200 Ash St.
43°28′02″N 89°44′24″W / 43.467222°N 89.74°W / 43.467222; -89.74 (Thompson House Hotel)
Baraboo Semi-Italianate hotel built around 1890(?) near the C&NW depot. Later housed the City Hotel, Wilder's Tavern, and a rooming house.[69]
53 Tripp Memorial Library and Hall
Tripp Memorial Library and Hall
September 14, 1981
(#81000060)
565 Water St.
43°17′29″N 89°43′17″W / 43.291389°N 89.721389°W / 43.291389; -89.721389 (Tripp Memorial Library and Hall)
Prairie du Sac J. S. Tripp, a local banker, lawyer and public servant, donated funds to build a library and village hall. William Dresen and Alfred C. Clas designed it in Neoclassical style and it opened in 1913.[70]
54 A.G. Tuttle Estate
A.G. Tuttle Estate
November 6, 1980
(#80000194)
N. Elizabeth St.
43°29′00″N 89°43′59″W / 43.483333°N 89.733056°W / 43.483333; -89.733056 (A.G. Tuttle Estate)
Baraboo Gothic revival house built in 1869.[71] Tuttle started a fruit tree orchard in 1853.[72]
55 Van Hise Rock
Van Hise Rock
September 25, 1997
(#97001267)
WI 136, 0.75 mi. N of WI 154
43°29′22″N 89°54′55″W / 43.489444°N 89.915278°W / 43.489444; -89.915278 (Van Hise Rock)
Rock Springs Roadside outcrop of quartzite which shows cross-bedding. UW-Madison geologist Charles Van Hise used this outcrop and others to interpret the Precambrian rock of the Baraboo district.[73]
56 Jacob Van Orden House
Jacob Van Orden House
September 6, 1996
(#96000988)
531 4th Ave.
43°28′15″N 89°45′06″W / 43.470833°N 89.751667°W / 43.470833; -89.751667 (Jacob Van Orden House)
Baraboo Tudor Revival house designed by Ferry & Clas and built in 1903. Van Orden had worked his way up from "general utility boy" to president of the First National Bank of Baraboo. Now houses the Sauk County Historical Museum.[74]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The latitude and longitude information provided is primarily from the National Register Information System, and has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. For 1%, the location info may be way off. We seek to correct the coordinate information wherever it is found to be erroneous. Please leave a note in the Discussion page for this article if you believe any specific location is incorrect.
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on June 1, 2018.
  3. ^ Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  4. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-24). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  5. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  6. ^ "Baraboo Public Library - Library History". Baraboo Public Library. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Historical and Architectural Walking Tour of Reedsburg". Reedsburg Public Library. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  8. ^ "Indian Relocation Fails at Reedsburg". Reedsburg Public Library. Retrieved 2012-05-30. 
  9. ^ "City Hotel". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-05-24. 
  10. ^ "3 more added to historic list". The Milwaukee Journal. 1980-04-27. Retrieved 2012-06-01. 
  11. ^ "J. Corwith Livery (Feed Barn)". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-05-23. 
  12. ^ Eiseley, Jane (Summer 1991). "Place of Hawks". Wisconsin Academy Review. 3. Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. 37: 15–19. 
  13. ^ "August W. Derleth House (Place of Hawks)". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-09-03. 
  14. ^ "Devil's Lake State Park". National Register or State Register. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  15. ^ "Downtown Baraboo Historic District". National Register or State Register. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  16. ^ "Draper Brothers Meat Market". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  17. ^ "Moeller Wagon Shop". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  18. ^ "Ewing Livery". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  19. ^ "Frank Miller Saloon". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  20. ^ "Civil War Memorial". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  21. ^ "First Methodist Episcopal Church". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  22. ^ "The Wellington Hotel". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  23. ^ "Baraboo Steam Laundry". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  24. ^ "Trimpey Building". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  25. ^ "Baraboo High School". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  26. ^ "Juliar Theatre". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  27. ^ "Durst Rockshelter (No. 44)". Wisconsin State Natural Areas Program. Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  28. ^ "Free Congregation of Sauk County". Free Congregation of Sauk County. Retrieved January 29, 2018. 
  29. ^ "Gust Brothers Store". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-29. 
  30. ^ "Edward M. Hackett House". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-09-03. 
  31. ^ "Otto Sr. and Lisette Hahn House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-30. 
  32. ^ Anderson, Nathan (2010-06-24). "It's old-school: One-room schoolhouse in Troy restored". Baraboo News Republic. Retrieved 2015-04-04. 
  33. ^ "Harrisburg School". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-04. 
  34. ^ Eiseley, Jane; William H. Tishler (Autumn 1989). "The Honey Creek Swiss Settlement in Sauk County: An Expression of Cultural Norms in Rural Wisconsin". Wisconsin Magazine of History. 1. 73: 3–20. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  35. ^ Gartner, William G. "Hulburt Creek Garden Beds". Sauk County Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  36. ^ "Island Woolen Company Office Building". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-29. 
  37. ^ Bridgeford, Brian D. (2011-09-01). "Making history: Woolen Mill earns spot on National Registry of Historic Places". Baraboo News Republic. Retrieved 2012-05-29. 
  38. ^ a b c Stehling, Donna. "Historic Sauk City - Walkers and Wheels Guide" (PDF). Sauk City Historic Preservation Committee. Retrieved 2012-05-29. 
  39. ^ "List of Some Buildings in Reedsburg's Main Street Commercial Historic District". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-05-23. 
  40. ^ "Man Mound". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-29. 
  41. ^ "Manchester Street Bridge, Spanning Baraboo River on Manchester Street, Baraboo, Sauk County, WI". Historic American Buildings Survey, Engineering Record, Landscapes Survey. Library of Congress. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  42. ^ "Manchester Street Bridge". BridgeHunter.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  43. ^ "Marshall Memorial Hall". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-29. 
  44. ^ "Merrimac Ferry - History". Wisconsin Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 29, 2018. 
  45. ^ "Our Lady of Loretto Church". Landmarks Registry of Sauk County. Sauk County. Retrieved January 29, 2018. 
  46. ^ "Cottage for Mr. Seth C. Peterson". The Seth Peterson Cottage Conservancy, Inc. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  47. ^ "Point of Rocks". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-31. 
  48. ^ "Walworth Porter Duplex". Landmarks Registry of Sauk County. Sauk County. Retrieved January 29, 2018. 
  49. ^ "Raddatz Rockshelter and Natural Bridge". Wisconsin Historical Images. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  50. ^ "Reedsburg Post Office (U.S. Post Office)". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  51. ^ "Post Office, Reedsburg, Wisconsin". The Living New Deal. University of California Regents. Retrieved 2012-06-01. 
  52. ^ "Reedsburg Woolen Mill Office". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-05-25. 
  53. ^ "Rest Haven Motel". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-31. 
  54. ^ "The Usonian Inn: History". Retrieved August 7, 2011. 
  55. ^ "Ringling Brothers Circus Winter Quarters". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-19. 
  56. ^ "Al Ringling Theater". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-19. 
  57. ^ The Al Ringling House - marker in front of house. Sauk County Historical Society. 1985. 
  58. ^ "Charles Ringling House (Charles E. and Edith)". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  59. ^ "Ruhland, Charles and Anna, House". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2017-04-05. 
  60. ^ Damos, Tim (2012-08-15). "City stalls plan to raze property". WiscNews. Baraboo News Republic. Retrieved 2017-04-05. 
  61. ^ "Salem-Ragatz Historic Church". Sauk Prairie Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-07-17. 
  62. ^ Eiseley, Jane; William H. Tishler (Autumn 1989). "The Honey Creek Swiss Settlement in Sauk County: An Expression of Cultural Norms in Rural Wisconsin". Wisconsin Magazine of History. 1. 73: 6,. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  63. ^ "Histories of the Historic Registry Sites". Village of Sauk City. Retrieved 2012-05-31. 
  64. ^ "Sauk County Courthouse". Landmarks Registry of Sauk County. Sauk County. Retrieved January 29, 2018. 
  65. ^ "A Fine New Residence Begun". Baraboo Republic. 1860-08-09. Archived from the original on 2012-06-27. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  66. ^ "Spellman Granite Works". National Register or State Register. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  67. ^ "State Bank of Spring Green". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-31. 
  68. ^ "Chicago and Northwestern #1385". Mid-Continent Railway Museum. Retrieved January 29, 2018. 
  69. ^ "Thompson House Hotel". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-06-14. 
  70. ^ "Tripp Memorial Museum". Sauk Prairie Area Historical Society. Archived from the original on 2012-07-12. Retrieved 2012-07-17. 
  71. ^ "Albert G. Tuttle Estate". Architecture and History Inventory. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  72. ^ Harris, J. S. (December 1896). "A Longfield Apple Tree and its Planter, A. F. Tuttle, Baraboo Wis." The Minnesota Horticulturist. 24 (12): 473. Retrieved 2012-07-17. 
  73. ^ "Van Hise Rock". Wisconsin HIstorical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-31. 
  74. ^ "Jacob Van Orden House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-05-19.