National Register of Historic Places listings in Winnebago County, Wisconsin

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Location of Winnebago County in Wisconsin

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Winnebago County, Wisconsin.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a map.[1]

There are 88 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county.[2] Several of these properties in Oshkosh were used in filming the 2009 movie Public Enemies.[3]

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 19, 2017.[4]

Current listings[edit]

[5] Name on the Register[2] Image Date listed[6] Location City or town Description
1 Algoma Boulevard Historic District
Algoma Boulevard Historic District
December 1, 1994
(#94001368)
Roughly Algoma Boulevard from Woodland Ave. to Hollister Ave.
44°02′01″N 88°33′23″W / 44.033611°N 88.556389°W / 44.033611; -88.556389 (Algoma Boulevard Historic District)
Oshkosh String of large, elaborate homes, once known as the "Gold Coast" of Oshkosh. Many were built by lumber barons and officers of their companies. Notable examples of different styles are[7] the 1857 Greek Revival Kohlmann house,[8] the 1868 Italianate Anthes house,[9] the 1888 Queen Anne Charles Wood house,[10] the 1897 Shingle-style Ideson-Osborn house,[11] the 1911 Richardsonian Romanesque Moses Hooper house,[12] the 1908 Tudor Revival Sawyer house,[13] the 1911 Colonial Revival Schriber house,[14] the 1917 Wright-designed Prairie Style Hunt house,[15] and the 1926 Mediterranean Revival Converse house.[16]
2 Algoma Boulevard Methodist Church
Algoma Boulevard Methodist Church
December 3, 1974
(#74000140)
1174 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′55″N 88°33′19″W / 44.031944°N 88.555278°W / 44.031944; -88.555278 (Algoma Boulevard Methodist Church)
Oshkosh Richardsonian Romanesque Methodist church designed by Oshkosh architect William Waters and built in 1892. Prominent Oshkosh families belonged, including the Paines, Sawyers and Hicks.[17]
3 Gustav Augustin Block
Gustav Augustin Block
May 30, 1986
(#86001181)
68 Racine St.
44°12′07″N 88°26′46″W / 44.201944°N 88.446111°W / 44.201944; -88.446111 (Gustav Augustin Block)
Menasha This 1894 building is now the "most complete example of late 19th century commercial vernacular form in Menasha." German immigrant Gustav worked his way up from farming and factory work to running a grocery in the first floor of this building and living upstairs.[18]
4 Havilah Babcock House
Havilah Babcock House
August 7, 1974
(#74000141)
537 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°10′51″N 88°26′59″W / 44.180833°N 88.449722°W / 44.180833; -88.449722 (Havilah Babcock House)
Neenah Well-preserved 2.5 story Queen Anne home with 3-story round tower and touches of Eastlake style, Stick style, and Tudor Revival, designed by Waters and completed in 1883. Interior furnishings are mostly Eastlake, chosen by Havilah Babcock, one of the four founders of Kimberly, Clark and Co.[19][20]
5 George, Sr., and Ellen Banta House
George, Sr., and Ellen Banta House
May 5, 1997
(#97000366)
348 Naymut St.
44°11′47″N 88°26′38″W / 44.196389°N 88.443889°W / 44.196389; -88.443889 (George, Sr., and Ellen Banta House)
Menasha Two-story house built in 1878 and restyled to Queen Anne in 1888. In that year George began printing with a small press in the dining room of this house. That operation expanded to the modern Banta Corporation, which survived to 2006.[21]
6 Edward D. & Vina Shattuck Beals House
Edward D. & Vina Shattuck Beals House
February 27, 2008
(#08000121)
220 N. Park Ave.
44°11′16″N 88°26′50″W / 44.187778°N 88.447222°W / 44.187778; -88.447222 (Edward D. & Vina Shattuck Beals House)
Neenah Arts and Crafts-styled home overlooking the Fox River, designed by Alexander Eschweiler in the manner of British architect Charles Voysey in 1911. Edward led a door manufacturing business and Vina was a Kimberly-Clark heiress.[22]
7 George O. Bergstrom House
George O. Bergstrom House
March 22, 1993
(#93000144)
579 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°10′50″N 88°26′59″W / 44.180556°N 88.449722°W / 44.180556; -88.449722 (George O. Bergstrom House)
Neenah Queen Anne home with two towers, built in 1894, probably designed by Waters. Bergstrom immigrated from Norway in 1851, co-founded Bergstrom Brothers Stove Works, and served as mayor and director of banks in Neenah and Kaukauna. His son co-designed the Pentagon.[23]
8 Black Oak School
Black Oak School
June 25, 1987
(#87001062)
5028 S. Green Bay Rd.
43°56′42″N 88°34′56″W / 43.945°N 88.582222°W / 43.945; -88.582222 (Black Oak School)
Nekimi Second-generation one-room school, with hipped roof and bell tower, built around 1900.[24]
9 Abraham Briggs Bowen House
Abraham Briggs Bowen House
April 22, 1982
(#82000731)
1010 Bayshore Dr.
44°00′37″N 88°31′29″W / 44.010278°N 88.524722°W / 44.010278; -88.524722 (Abraham Briggs Bowen House)
Oshkosh Ornate early Italianate house built in 1856 for Bowen, real estate developer and investor in Michigan lumber. Later divided into rental units.[25]
10 Brainerd Site
Brainerd Site
September 7, 1984
(#84003823)
Address Restricted
Neenah
11 Brin Building
Brin Building
July 10, 1986
(#86001541)
1 Main St.
44°11′57″N 88°27′10″W / 44.199167°N 88.452778°W / 44.199167; -88.452778 (Brin Building)
Menasha Brick commercial building designed by local architect H. D. Werwath in Mediterranean Revival style and built in 1928. It included a 932-seat movie theater, stores, a 12-lane bowling alley in the basement, and apartments upstairs.[26]
12 Brooklyn No. 4 Fire House
Brooklyn No. 4 Fire House
January 11, 1996
(#95001505)
17 W. 6th Ave.
44°00′44″N 88°32′19″W / 44.012222°N 88.538611°W / 44.012222; -88.538611 (Brooklyn No. 4 Fire House)
Oshkosh Italianate-styled fire house designed by William Waters and built in 1868, after major fires in 1859 and 1866. By the time it closed in 1946, #4 spanned the transitions from volunteer firemen to professionals, from mobile pumps to hose wagons, and from horses to motorized trucks.[27]
13 Carpenter Site (47 Wn 246)
Carpenter Site (47 Wn 246)
April 7, 1982
(#82000725)
Address Restricted
Eureka
14 Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot
Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot
March 7, 1994
(#94000134)
500 N. Commercial St.
44°11′35″N 88°27′23″W / 44.193056°N 88.456389°W / 44.193056; -88.456389 (Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot)
Neenah Hip-roofed red-brick depot of the C&NW, designed by Charles Sumner Frost in Richardsonian Romanesque style. Built in 1892, remodeled in 1942, and in service until 1982.[28]
15 Cole Watch Tower
Cole Watch Tower
June 9, 1978
(#78000148)
West of Omro on Highway 21
44°02′51″N 88°46′54″W / 44.0475°N 88.781667°W / 44.0475; -88.781667 (Cole Watch Tower)
Omro 7-story brick and steel tower added in 1935 to an Italianate farmhouse built in the 1870s. The tower provided living quarters, but also a perch from which the Coles could watch their fox pens without disturbing the animals.[29]
16 Daily Northwestern Building
Daily Northwestern Building
May 13, 1982
(#82000732)
224 State St.
44°01′00″N 88°32′09″W / 44.016667°N 88.535833°W / 44.016667; -88.535833 (Daily Northwestern Building)
Oshkosh Newspaper office and production building designed by Auler, Jensen & Brown of Oshkosh in Neo-Italian Renaissance style and built in 1930. The Daily Northwestern, founded in 1860 and guided by John Hicks, became one of the strongest Republican papers in the state, and is the only survivor of the early papers.[30]
17 Doty Island (47-WN-30)
Doty Island (47-WN-30)
June 20, 1985
(#85001368)
Address Restricted
Menasha
18 Doty Island Village Site
Doty Island Village Site
January 19, 1996
(#95001552)
Address Restricted
44°11′19″N 88°26′19″W / 44.188611°N 88.438611°W / 44.188611; -88.438611 (Doty Island Village Site)
Neenah
19 East Forest Avenue Historic District
East Forest Avenue Historic District
November 9, 2005
(#05001229)
Generally bounded by E. Forest Ave., Webster St., Hewitt St., and 11th St.
44°11′27″N 88°26′44″W / 44.190833°N 88.445556°W / 44.190833; -88.445556 (East Forest Avenue Historic District)
Neenah Well-to-do neighborhood with 27 contributing properties,[31] including the 1882 Italianate/Second Empire Syme-Gilbert House,[32] several Queen Anne houses listed below, the 1904 Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Gilbert-Lachmann House[33] pictured at left, the 1915 Arts & Crafts/Craftsman Pfeiffer-Kimberley house,[34] the 1924 American Foursquare Seiler House,[35] and the 1937 International-styled Bellack House.[36]
20 Equitable Fraternal Union Building
Equitable Fraternal Union Building
January 19, 2016
(#15000989)
116 S. Commercial St.
44°11′09″N 88°27′44″W / 44.185864°N 88.462156°W / 44.185864; -88.462156 (Equitable Fraternal Union Building)
Neenah Meeting hall of a fraternal life insurance society, designed by William Waters in Neoclassical style and built in 1908.[37]
21 Eureka Lock and Lock Tender's House
Eureka Lock and Lock Tender's House
September 29, 1976
(#76000082)
South of Eureka on the Fox River
43°59′45″N 88°52′18″W / 43.995833°N 88.871667°W / 43.995833; -88.871667 (Eureka Lock and Lock Tender's House)
Eureka 200x35 foot navigation lock built of wood in 1876 as part of the Fox–Wisconsin Waterway and rebuilt of concrete in 1941, with lock-tender's house built in 1878.[38] Now the only operating lock on the upper Fox, since a revamp by the Berlin Boat Club in 2012.[39]
22 First Methodist Church
First Methodist Church
March 17, 1995
(#95000247)
502 N. Main St.
44°01′12″N 88°32′13″W / 44.02°N 88.536944°W / 44.02; -88.536944 (First Methodist Church)
Oshkosh Unusual (in Wisconsin) urban church building with storefronts at street-level. The building was begun as an opera house, until damaged by a fire in 1874. At that point the Methodist congregation bought it and completed it as a Neo-Classical-styled church. After they moved to a new building in 1970, it was used by Boys' Club and as a homeless shelter.[40][1]
23 First Presbyterian Church
First Presbyterian Church
December 27, 1974
(#74000142)
110 Church Ave.
44°01′14″N 88°32′19″W / 44.020556°N 88.538611°W / 44.020556; -88.538611 (First Presbyterian Church)
Oshkosh Picturesque Richardsonian Romanesque church designed by W. A. Holbrook and built in 1893 by Presbyterian congregation.[41]
24 Fraternal Reserve Association
Fraternal Reserve Association
February 2, 2016
(#15001048)
105 Washington Ave.
44°01′04″N 88°32′10″W / 44.017715°N 88.536235°W / 44.017715; -88.536235 (Fraternal Reserve Association)
Oshkosh 4-story office building designed by local architect Henry Auler in Neoclassical style and built 1913-14 to house a fraternal insurance company which merged with Equitable Fraternal Union of Neenah in 1930. A.k.a. the Washington Building.[42][43]
25 Frontenac
Frontenac
April 22, 1982
(#82000733)
132-140 High St. and 9 Brown St.
44°01′05″N 88°32′22″W / 44.018056°N 88.539444°W / 44.018056; -88.539444 (Frontenac)
Oshkosh 2-story Victorian apartment building, mixing Queen Anne style and Richardsonian Romanesque, built from 1893 to 1899 by Joseph T. Raycraft. Largely unchanged since.[44][45]
26 Hans Gram House
Hans Gram House
July 2, 1987
(#87001123)
345 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°11′01″N 88°27′19″W / 44.183611°N 88.455278°W / 44.183611; -88.455278 (Hans Gram House)
Neenah 2-story frame home with Queen Anne and Italianate influences, built in 1887. Hans operated a dry goods store.[46]
27 Grand Loggery
Grand Loggery
March 22, 1974
(#74000143)
Doty Park (Lincoln St.)
44°11′14″N 88°26′53″W / 44.187222°N 88.448056°W / 44.187222; -88.448056 (Grand Loggery)
Neenah Large house of squared logs built in 1845 by James Doty, territorial judge, land developer (of Madison in particular), and governor of Wisconsin Territory and Utah Territory. Mrs. Doty is said to have named the house. Reconstructed in 1948 and now a museum.[47]
28 Augustin Grignon Hotel
Augustin Grignon Hotel
April 14, 1975
(#75000084)
Southeastern corner of the junction of Main and Washington Sts.
44°05′58″N 88°39′12″W / 44.099444°N 88.653333°W / 44.099444; -88.653333 (Augustin Grignon Hotel)
Butte des Morts Early inn/trading post built in 1843 by Augustin Grignon on the Tomahawk Trail, which ran from Green Bay to Prairie du Chien. The Greek Revival building housed a trading post, post office and saloon on the first floor and guest rooms on the second. It is one of the oldest wooden buildings in the state.[48]
29 Richard Guenther House
Richard Guenther House
March 1, 1984
(#84003824)
1200 Washington Ave.
44°01′05″N 88°31′18″W / 44.018056°N 88.521667°W / 44.018056; -88.521667 (Richard Guenther House)
Oshkosh Large Queen Anne house designed by Waters and built in 1888 for Richard W. Guenther, a Prussian immigrant, Oshkosh druggist, Wisconsin state treasurer, US Congressman, and diplomat. From 1906 to 1913 the large house also hosted the new Lakeside Sanitorium and Training School for Nurses, which later evolved into Mercy Medical Center.[49]
30 Frank Winchester Hawks House
Frank Winchester Hawks House
May 9, 1997
(#97000430)
433 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°10′57″N 88°27′14″W / 44.1825°N 88.453889°W / 44.1825; -88.453889 (Frank Winchester Hawks House)
Neenah Shingle-style home built in 1904. Frank was an Indiana furniture manufacturer who married Helen Howard, and joined her father's paper-making business. Their son, film director Howard Hawks, spent part of his boyhood in the house.[50]
31 Jessie Jack Hooper House
Jessie Jack Hooper House
December 18, 1978
(#78000151)
1149 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′52″N 88°33′20″W / 44.031111°N 88.555556°W / 44.031111; -88.555556 (Jessie Jack Hooper House)
Oshkosh Home of women's suffrage leader Jessie Jack Hooper. The house and matching coach house are Shingle style, designed by Waters and built in 1888. Her husband Benjamin was a grocery wholesaler. Jessie also organized women's war work during World War I, presided over the Wisconsin League of Women Voters in the 20s, and was involved in anti-war campaigns in the 30s.[51]
32 Irving-Church Historic District
Irving-Church Historic District
March 7, 1994
(#94000156)
Roughly bounded by W. Irving Ave., Franklin St., Church Ave., Wisconsin St., and Amherst Ave.
44°01′23″N 88°32′45″W / 44.023056°N 88.545833°W / 44.023056; -88.545833 (Irving-Church Historic District)
Oshkosh Large residential district of homes built from 1858 to 1938, dominated by Queen Anne homes[52] like the 1880 Edward Jones house.[53] Other styles are represented, including the 1878 Italianate Rogers house,[54] the 1900 NeoClassical Radford house,[55] the 1914 Craftsman/Prairie Style Davis house,[56] the 1921 Mediterranean Revival Foster house,[57] the 1924 Clark(?) Bungalow,[58] and the 1938 Tudor Revival Zielke house.[59]
33 Ellis Jennings House
Ellis Jennings House
March 20, 1992
(#92000110)
711 E. Forest Ave.
44°11′24″N 88°26′54″W / 44.19°N 88.448333°W / 44.19; -88.448333 (Ellis Jennings House)
Neenah Queen Anne home designed by Waters and built in 1893. Jennings was a partner in a small lumber business.[60]
34 Rev. Jens N. Jersild House
Rev. Jens N. Jersild House
September 2, 2003
(#03000898)
331 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°11′03″N 88°27′24″W / 44.184072°N 88.456667°W / 44.184072; -88.456667 (Rev. Jens N. Jersild House)
Neenah Queen Anne house with Colonial Revival veranda, built in 1886. Danish immigrant Jersild was a Lutheran minister who was a key player in a doctrinal battle that split the Danish Lutheran Church of America. He was also a publisher, and founder of the Jersild Knitting Company.[61]
35 Kamrath Site
Kamrath Site
May 6, 1975
(#75000085)
Address Restricted
Winneconne Paleo-Indian and Archaic archaeological site, which has produced many rhyolite adzes.[62]
36 Judge J.C. Kerwin House
Judge J.C. Kerwin House
August 16, 1996
(#96000907)
516 E. Forest Ave.
44°11′26″N 88°26′58″W / 44.190556°N 88.449444°W / 44.190556; -88.449444 (Judge J.C. Kerwin House)
Neenah Queen Anne house with Georgian Revival influences built in 1885. Kerwin was a son of Menasha who successfully opposed railroad and utility interests as a local attorney, served as Neenah city attorney, on the UW Board of Regents, and on the state Supreme Court.[63]
37 Kimberly Point Park Lighthouse
Kimberly Point Park Lighthouse
February 5, 2013
(#12001275)
290 Lake Shore Ave.
44°11′08″N 88°26′30″W / 44.185612°N 88.441671°W / 44.185612; -88.441671 (Kimberly Point Park Lighthouse)
Neenah A gift from J. C. Kimberly, built in 1945 to serve as a rest stop, a guide into Neenah harbor, and a landmark for boat races.[64] Also known as Neenah Light.
38 Carl Koch Block
Carl Koch Block
July 10, 1986
(#86001539)
2 Tayco St.
44°11′56″N 88°27′11″W / 44.198889°N 88.453056°W / 44.198889; -88.453056 (Carl Koch Block)
Menasha Elegant brick commercial building built in 1882 in the business district near the Butte des Morts Bridge. The first floor housed a saloon and Bavarian immigrant Koch's own dry goods store. Koch lived on the second floor and rented out an apartment there.[65]
39 Larson Brothers Airport
Larson Brothers Airport
April 5, 1984
(#84003825)
Highway 150
44°12′10″N 88°38′19″W / 44.202778°N 88.638611°W / 44.202778; -88.638611 (Larson Brothers Airport)
Clayton Early Wisconsin airport, opened in 1922 by the four Larson brothers, with the original sod landing field and a hangar constructed with barn-building techniques. The Larsons were the first agency in Wisconsin to sell government-approved planes.[66]
40 Lasley's Point Site
Lasley's Point Site
September 6, 1979
(#79000120)
5900 Lasley Point Road
Coordinates missing
Winneconne This site of an Oneota village from 1200 to 1500 AD contained garden beds, cache pits, bone tools, shells, human bones, copper flakes, charcoal and pottery.[67]
41 Perry Lindsley House
Perry Lindsley House
September 2, 2003
(#03000899)
1102 E. Forest Ave.
44°11′33″N 88°26′36″W / 44.1925°N 88.443333°W / 44.1925; -88.443333 (Perry Lindsley House)
Neenah Modest but classic 1893 Shingle-style home designed by Waters.[68]
42 Robert Lutz House
Robert Lutz House
May 27, 1982
(#82000734)
1449 Knapp St.
44°00′17″N 88°33′47″W / 44.004722°N 88.563056°W / 44.004722; -88.563056 (Robert Lutz House)
Oshkosh 1910 limestone Queen Anne/eclectic house with porte-cochere, designed by Waters. Also a matching brick barn built in 1925 for Lutz's Belgians, and a pigeon coop. The limestone came from Lutz's quarry nearby. He also helped found the State Bank of Oshkosh.[69]
43 Mayer-Banderob House
Mayer-Banderob House
September 23, 1999
(#99001174)
809 Ceape Ave.
44°00′53″N 88°31′36″W / 44.014722°N 88.526667°W / 44.014722; -88.526667 (Mayer-Banderob House)
Oshkosh Brick Italianate home built around 1868 for Bavarian immigrant George Mayer, the first jeweler in Oshkosh. John Banderob lived in the house from 1890 to 1921. He was also a German immigrant, Civil War veteran, furniture manufacturer, and progressive six-term mayor of Oshkosh.[70]
44 Menasha Dam
Menasha Dam
December 7, 1993
(#93001330)
Fox River at Mill St.
44°11′58″N 88°26′48″W / 44.199444°N 88.446667°W / 44.199444; -88.446667 (Menasha Dam)
Menasha 402 foot concrete dam rebuilt in 1937 to replace earlier wooden dams. All were built as part of the Fox-Wisconsin Waterway, to flood the Menasha lock and raise or lower boats between Lake Winnebago and Little Lake Butte des Morts.[71]
45 Menasha Lock Site
Menasha Lock Site
January 5, 1998
(#93001323)
Address Restricted
Menasha
46 Metzig Garden Site (47WN283)
Metzig Garden Site (47WN283)
December 29, 1988
(#88003070)
Address Restricted
Wolf River Paleo-indian archeological site which has produced two distinct types of early projectile points, and hints at their sequencing.[72]
47 John R. Morgan House
John R. Morgan House
October 14, 1983
(#83004365)
234 Church Ave.
44°01′17″N 88°33′13″W / 44.021389°N 88.553611°W / 44.021389; -88.553611 (John R. Morgan House)
Oshkosh Elaborate Queen Anne home with octagonal tower, designed and built by Bell and Cole of Oshkosh in 1884. Morgan was an immigrant from Wales, a civic leader, and a principal of Morgan Brothers, a large sash, door and blind company.[73]
48 Neenah United States Post Office
Neenah United States Post Office
November 8, 1990
(#90001743)
307 S. Commercial St.
44°11′06″N 88°27′48″W / 44.1849°N 88.4633°W / 44.1849; -88.4633 (Neenah United States Post Office)
Neenah Georgian Revival post office with fanlight and palladian window, built 1916-18.[74][75]
49 North Main Street Bungalow Historic District
North Main Street Bungalow Historic District
September 25, 2013
(#13000783)
North Main St. generally bounded by Nevada & Huron Aves.
44°02′14″N 88°32′15″W / 44.037118°N 88.537619°W / 44.037118; -88.537619 (North Main Street Bungalow Historic District)
Oshkosh Neighborhood of homes constructed from 1908 to 1930, predominantly Craftsman bungalows built by middle-class carpenters, railroad men, machinists, salesmen, etc.[76]
50 North Main Street Historic District
North Main Street Historic District
March 7, 1996
(#96000250)
Roughly N. Main St. from Parkway Ave. to Algoma Boulevard, and Market St. northwest to High Ave.
44°01′11″N 88°32′16″W / 44.019722°N 88.537778°W / 44.019722; -88.537778 (North Main Street Historic District)
Oshkosh The old commercial downtown of Oshkosh, rebuilt after the fires of 1874 and 1875 in brick to replace the previous wood buildings.[77] Notable examples of different styles include the Waters-designed 1876 Italianate Beckwith House Hotel,[78] the 1895 Queen Anne Webster Block,[79] the 1907 Soldiers Monument at Market and High Ave.,[80] the 1926 Modern Broadfront-styled Foute-Slate Auto Company,[81] and the 1927 Neo-Gothic/Art Deco Raulf Hotel.[82]
51 Omro Downtown Historic District
Omro Downtown Historic District
March 7, 1996
(#96000248)
Junction of Main St. and S. Webster Ave.
44°02′22″N 88°44′41″W / 44.039444°N 88.744722°W / 44.039444; -88.744722 (Omro Downtown Historic District)
Omro Omro's old commercial downtown, including the 1871 Race Hardware store Building, the 1874 Northwestern Hotel, the 1881 Frank Building, the 1894 I.O.O.F. Building, the 1890-95 Earl & McGuire grocery building, and the 1927 Anton Bank Meat Market.[83]
52 Omro High School, Annex and Webster Manual Training School
Omro High School, Annex and Webster Manual Training School
June 19, 1985
(#85001369)
515 S. Webster St.
44°02′07″N 88°44′43″W / 44.035278°N 88.745278°W / 44.035278; -88.745278 (Omro High School, Annex and Webster Manual Training School)
Omro The old middle-school complex, consisting of the Romanesque Revival/Italianate high school built 1893 and 1909, the 1906 Romanesque Webster building, and the Annex built in 1934. The Webster Manual Training School was one of the early vocational-ed schools in the state.[84]
53 Omro Village Hall and Engine House
Omro Village Hall and Engine House
April 14, 1997
(#97000327)
144 E. Main St.
44°02′21″N 88°44′37″W / 44.039167°N 88.743611°W / 44.039167; -88.743611 (Omro Village Hall and Engine House)
Omro Late Victorian municipal building with a 3.5 (or 5?) story tower, designed by Fred G. Root and built in 1896 to house Omro's village offices, fire department, and jail. Now houses the museum.[85]
54 Orville Beach Memorial Manual Training School
Orville Beach Memorial Manual Training School
September 12, 1985
(#85002334)
240 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′11″N 88°32′25″W / 44.019722°N 88.540278°W / 44.019722; -88.540278 (Orville Beach Memorial Manual Training School)
Oshkosh Built in 1911, this was one of the earliest vocational-tech schools in Wisconsin. Building is a 3-story Neoclassical design of Waters. Orville ran lumber mills, was involved in banks, and helped found the Oshkosh and Mississippi Railroad. His wife Helen gave the city a large endowment to found the school.[86][87]
55 Oshkosh Grand Opera House
Oshkosh Grand Opera House
January 21, 1974
(#74000144)
100 High Ave.
44°01′02″N 88°32′19″W / 44.017222°N 88.538611°W / 44.017222; -88.538611 (Oshkosh Grand Opera House)
Oshkosh Cream-brick Victorian opera house designed by Waters and built in 1883, hosting Caruso, the Barrymores, James Whitcomb Riley, Jenny Lind, Mark Twain, and others. Converted to a movie theater in 1949,[88] and restored to a live theater in the 1980s.[89]
56 Oshkosh State Normal School Historic District
Oshkosh State Normal School Historic District
December 6, 1984
(#84000722)
Buildings at 800, 842, and 912 Algoma Boulevard, and 845 Elmwood Ave.
44°01′45″N 88°33′04″W / 44.029167°N 88.551111°W / 44.029167; -88.551111 (Oshkosh State Normal School Historic District)
Oshkosh Buildings of the old teachers training school, including the 1912 Industrial Education Building and the 1917 Administration and Science Building designed by Van Ryn & DeGelleke, and the 1926 Swart Training School designed by Arthur Peabody, along with the Oviatt house described elsewhere on this page.[90]
57 Overton Archeological District
Overton Archeological District
May 2, 1975
(#75000086)
Address Restricted
Oshkosh
58 Oviatt House
Oviatt House
August 27, 1979
(#79000121)
842 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′38″N 88°33′06″W / 44.027222°N 88.551667°W / 44.027222; -88.551667 (Oviatt House)
Oshkosh Victorian house with an exterior of rough blue limestone and corner tower, designed by Waters and built in 1882 for Moses Hooper. Hooper was an Oshkosh attorney who represented Kimberly-Clark among others, and was such an authority on riparian rights that he appeared before the US Supreme Court repeatedly. In 1900 the house was bought by Dr. Charles Oviatt, a noted surgeon who insisted that nuns assisting in surgery wear sterilized garb rather than woolen habits, and eventually received a letter of agreement from Pope Leo XIII.[91]
59 Henry Paepke House
Henry Paepke House
March 13, 1987
(#87000462)
251 E. Doty Ave.
44°11′01″N 88°27′30″W / 44.183611°N 88.458333°W / 44.183611; -88.458333 (Henry Paepke House)
Neenah 1885 house built by Paepke himself in Stick style, which is unusual in the Fox valley. Paepke was a German immigrant building contractor who worked on St. Mary's Catholic Church of Menasha and Menasha City Hall.[92]
60 Paine Art Center and Arboretum
Paine Art Center and Arboretum
December 1, 1978
(#78000152)
1410 Algoma Boulevard
44°02′07″N 88°33′30″W / 44.035278°N 88.558333°W / 44.035278; -88.558333 (Paine Art Center and Arboretum)
Oshkosh Rambling English-like country house with gardens, designed in Tudor Revival style by Bryant Fleming and built from 1927 to 1947 by lumberman Nathan Paine[93] as a home, and as a gift to his community.[94] Now an art museum and arboretum.[95]
61 Paine Lumber Company Historic District
Paine Lumber Company Historic District
June 26, 1986
(#86001392)
Off Congress Ave. roughly between High, New York, and Summit Aves., and a Paine Lumber access road
44°02′01″N 88°33′51″W / 44.033611°N 88.564167°W / 44.033611; -88.564167 (Paine Lumber Company Historic District)
Oshkosh Edward Paine founded a lumber mill here on the east bank of the Fox in 1853.[96] His sons and grandson developed the enterprise, steering it through the Oshkosh Woodworkers Strike of 1898 and growing it into the largest sash and door company in the world in 1929. Remnants include row houses for workers, a company bank, and the dockwall along the river.[97]
62 William E. Pollock Residence
William E. Pollock Residence
December 6, 1984
(#84000728)
765 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′31″N 88°33′04″W / 44.025278°N 88.551111°W / 44.025278; -88.551111 (William E. Pollock Residence)
Oshkosh Spanish-Mediterranean Revival home completed in 1920 by Fluor Brothers of Oshkosh for Pollock, who headed Oshkosh Overall Co, which would become Oshkosh B'Gosh. Pollock later donated it to the Teachers College and it has served as dormitory etc, but remains well-preserved.[98]
63 Read School Upload image
February 11, 1993
(#93000025)
1120 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′51″N 88°33′16″W / 44.0307°N 88.5544°W / 44.0307; -88.5544 (Read School)
Oshkosh Public school built in phases, with the first High Victorian Italianate sections designed by Waters and built in 1879, 1893 and 1907, and other sections built later. George Read was Superintendent of Schools at the time.[99]
64 Riverside Cemetery
Riverside Cemetery
June 26, 2003
(#03000578)
1901 Algoma Boulevard
44°02′48″N 88°33′58″W / 44.046667°N 88.566111°W / 44.046667; -88.566111 (Riverside Cemetery)
Oshkosh Large old cemetery begun in 1855 along the Fox River, with a 1921 Richardsonian Romanesque chapel, a G.A.R. veterans plot, a Masonic section, a potter's field, and family mausoleums in various styles.[100]
65 Security Bank
Security Bank
October 7, 1994
(#94001212)
903 Oregon St.
44°00′37″N 88°32′34″W / 44.010278°N 88.542778°W / 44.010278; -88.542778 (Security Bank)
Oshkosh Brick and limestone bank designed by Oshkosh architect Julius Dreger in NeoClassical style and built by C.R. Meyer and Sons in 1926-27, with a 20-foot vault from the Mosler Safe Company.[101]
66 J. Leslie Sensenbrenner House
J. Leslie Sensenbrenner House
September 2, 2003
(#03000897)
256 N. Park Ave.
44°11′13″N 88°26′42″W / 44.186944°N 88.445°W / 44.186944; -88.445 (J. Leslie Sensenbrenner House)
Neenah The Cape-Cod styled core was built in 1932 by Menasha industrialist George Gaylord, then extensively remodeled and expanded by Sensenbrenner in 1941 in various period revival styles. Sensenbrenner and his father were executives at Kimberly-Clark.[102]
67 Franklyn C. Shattuck House
Franklyn C. Shattuck House
December 4, 1978
(#78000153)
547 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°10′51″N 88°27′02″W / 44.180833°N 88.450556°W / 44.180833; -88.450556 (Franklyn C. Shattuck House)
Neenah Georgian Revival home with porte cochere designed by Ferry & Clas and built 1890-93. Shattuck was a founder of Kimberly-Clark. His son Arthur was a well-known concert pianist. Daniel Brown, president of the Neenah Paper Company, later lived in the house.[103]
68 Henry Sherry House
Henry Sherry House
December 22, 1999
(#99001607)
527 E. Wisconsin Ave.
44°11′00″N 88°27′06″W / 44.183333°N 88.451667°W / 44.183333; -88.451667 (Henry Sherry House)
Neenah Home with 4-story tower and porte cochere, designed by Waters in High Victorian Gothic style with some Queen Anne decoration and built in 1883. Sherry was a lumberman with interests in northeastern and central Wisconsin. The house was later the home of Hugh Strange of the Strange Lumber Company.[104]
69 Charles R. Smith House
Charles R. Smith House
July 16, 1979
(#79000122)
824 E. Forest Ave.
44°11′26″N 88°26′42″W / 44.190556°N 88.445°W / 44.190556; -88.445 (Charles R. Smith House)
Neenah Rambling mansion begun by Smith in 1890 and later expanded with various pavilions and porches with Queen Anne, Italianate, and Colonial Revival features.[105] Charles was a son of Elisha Smith, founder of Menasha Wooden Ware, and expanded, modernized, and diversified the company when he took over. For his second wife, Smith got the town of Warner renamed Ladysmith, and after Charles died, that wife married the silent movie actor Orrin Johnson, who retired to the mansion.[106]
70 Henry Spencer Smith House
Henry Spencer Smith House
June 25, 1982
(#82000735)
706 E. Forest Ave.
44°11′27″N 88°26′47″W / 44.190833°N 88.446389°W / 44.190833; -88.446389 (Henry Spencer Smith House)
Neenah Another Smith mansion, started in 1892 and expanded by another son of Elisha Smith and executive of Menasha Wooden Ware. Included music room, conservatory, 3-story tower, and third floor ballroom. At least partly designed by Waters.[107]
71 Hiram Smith House
Hiram Smith House
September 6, 1996
(#96000990)
336 Main St.
44°11′10″N 88°28′07″W / 44.186111°N 88.468611°W / 44.186111; -88.468611 (Hiram Smith House)
Neenah 2-story brick octagon house with Italianate styling and rear wing, built between 1851 and 1854. Hiram ran a dry goods business, started an early paper company with his brother in 1865, and was president of the Manufacturer's Bank.[108]
72 Tayco Street Bridge
Tayco Street Bridge
May 30, 1986
(#86001182)
Tayco and Water Sts.
44°11′54″N 88°27′09″W / 44.198333°N 88.4525°W / 44.198333; -88.4525 (Tayco Street Bridge)
Menasha Drawbridge across the Government Canal, specifically a Strauss Trunnion bascule bridge with Classical styling, designed by McMahon & Clark Engineering of Menasha and built 1928-29.[109]
73 Trinity Episcopal Church
Trinity Episcopal Church
December 30, 1974
(#74000145)
203 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′08″N 88°32′24″W / 44.018889°N 88.54°W / 44.018889; -88.54 (Trinity Episcopal Church)
Oshkosh Richardsonian Romanesque church designed by Waters and built 1887-89, with a large round Tiffany stained glass window portraying "The Angel of Prayer".[110]
74 Upper Main Street Historic District
Upper Main Street Historic District
December 6, 1984
(#84000714)
163-240 Main, 3 Mill, 56 Racine, and 408 Water Sts.
44°12′04″N 88°26′51″W / 44.201111°N 88.4475°W / 44.201111; -88.4475 (Upper Main Street Historic District)
Menasha Old downtown, including[111] the 1884 High Victorian Scott Block[112] and Planner's Block,[113] the 1892 Clovis Block,[114] the 1894 Queen Anne-styled Masonic Block,[115] the 1895 Romanesque Revival Beck's Meat Market,[116] the 1897 Neoclassical Elisha D. Smith Library,[117] and the 1905 Waters-designed Hotel Menasha.[118]
75 US Post Office-Menasha
US Post Office-Menasha
August 22, 1986
(#86001518)
84 Racine St.
44°12′08″N 88°26′47″W / 44.202222°N 88.446389°W / 44.202222; -88.446389 (US Post Office-Menasha)
Menasha Colonial Revival post office with atypical mansard roof, built in 1931.[119]
76 Dewitt Clinton Van Ostrand House
Dewitt Clinton Van Ostrand House
January 9, 1997
(#96001575)
413 Church St.
44°11′05″N 88°27′53″W / 44.184722°N 88.464722°W / 44.184722; -88.464722 (Dewitt Clinton Van Ostrand House)
Neenah 2-story brick Italianate house started between 1855 and 1861. Van Ostrand was a pioneer businessman, involved in rocking chair manufacture, shipping, retail dry goods, flour milling, paper manufacture, stove manufacture, and banking. In the late 1860s, Van Ostrand's and Hiram Smith's Neenah Paper Company was one of the first to show the Fox Valley's potential for making paper.[120]
77 Gorham P. Vining House
Gorham P. Vining House
December 8, 1983
(#83004366)
1590 Oakridge Rd.
44°11′06″N 88°29′57″W / 44.185°N 88.499167°W / 44.185; -88.499167 (Gorham P. Vining House)
Neenah Well-preserved Greek Revival home with summer kitchen, built in 1848. Vining from Massachusetts, was an early settler of the Neenah area.[121]
78 Thomas R. Wall Residence
Thomas R. Wall Residence
December 6, 1984
(#84000732)
751 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′30″N 88°33′02″W / 44.025°N 88.550556°W / 44.025; -88.550556 (Thomas R. Wall Residence)
Oshkosh 1898 home designed by Waters in a blend of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles for Wall, a businessman with interests in lumber, steamships, and banking. Later owned by Morgan Davies of Morgan Sash and Door, then John Bartlett of Oshkosh Trunk, then UW-Oshkosh.[122]
79 Washington Avenue Historic District
Washington Avenue Historic District
May 22, 1986
(#86001129)
Roughly bounded by Merritt Ave., Linde and Lampert Sts., Washington Ave., and Bowen and Evan Sts.
44°01′06″N 88°31′20″W / 44.018333°N 88.522222°W / 44.018333; -88.522222 (Washington Avenue Historic District)
Oshkosh Large, mainly residential district on the east side,[123] including the 1870 Italianate Weisbrod house,[124] the 1885 Queen Anne Roenitz house,[125] the 1897 Queen Anne Buckstaff house pictured at left,[126] the 1903 Georgian Revival Oshkosh Yacht Club,[127] the 1904 Colonial Revival Schmidt house,[128] the 1911 Schwalm bungalow,[129] the 1927 English Cottage-style Meusel house,[130] and the 1929 Tudor Revival Stephenson house.[131]
80 Washington Avenue Neoclassical Historic District
Washington Avenue Neoclassical Historic District
April 10, 2017
(#100000863)
Roughly the 100 and 200 blocks of Washington Avenue
44°01′04″N 88°32′06″W / 44.017695°N 88.535113°W / 44.017695; -88.535113 (Washington Avenue Neoclassical Historic District)
Oshkosh A cluster of six stately Neoclassical-styled buildings: the 1900 Oshkosh Public Library,[132] the 1914 Fraternal Reserve Association,[133] the 1924 Goettman Printing Company,[134] the 1925 Oshkosh Masonic Temple,[135] the 1929 U.S. Post Office,[136] and the 1925 Wisconsin National Life Insurance Building.[137][138]
81 Washington Street Historic District
Washington Street Historic District
May 30, 1986
(#86001180)
214-216 Washington St.
44°11′43″N 88°27′15″W / 44.195278°N 88.454167°W / 44.195278; -88.454167 (Washington Street Historic District)
Menasha Consists of the 1930 Northwest Electrotype & Engraving Office & Plant[139] (pictured) and the 1935 Verbrick's Gas Station.[140] Both are in Tudor Revival style, part of an effort by Menasha Wooden Ware Corp. to redevelop its stave yards on Doty Island into an "English-styled" commercial district.[141]
82 S.H. Waterman House
S.H. Waterman House
February 25, 1993
(#93000068)
1141 Algoma Boulevard
44°01′52″N 88°33′21″W / 44.031111°N 88.555833°W / 44.031111; -88.555833 (S.H. Waterman House)
Oshkosh Large Queen Anne house with Eastlake ornamentation (e.g. delicate, turned spindle-work) built in 1889, with 2-story carriage house. Waterman was a lumberman.[142]
83 Frank Whiting Boathouse
Frank Whiting Boathouse
April 20, 2011
(#11000204)
98 5th St.
44°11′08″N 88°26′59″W / 44.185556°N 88.449722°W / 44.185556; -88.449722 (Frank Whiting Boathouse)
Neenah Spanish Revival-styled boathouse with rooftop dancing pavilion, where Whiting hosted yachting and tennis parties. Designed by Richard Messmer and built in 1932. Donated to the city after Whiting's death.[143]
84 Frank B. Whiting House
Frank B. Whiting House
May 31, 2000
(#00000523)
620 E. Forest Ave.
44°11′34″N 88°26′53″W / 44.192778°N 88.448056°W / 44.192778; -88.448056 (Frank B. Whiting House)
Neenah Queen Anne-style home built in 1885 for David Barnes, with 2-story carriage house. Whiting remodeled the house and installed a secret liquor vault during Prohibition. He led the Wisconsin River operations of his father's Whiting Paper Co. and promoted air travel in the Fox Valley.[144]
85 William C. Wing House
William C. Wing House
May 6, 1993
(#93000400)
143 N. Park Ave.
44°10′52″N 88°26′44″W / 44.181111°N 88.445556°W / 44.181111; -88.445556 (William C. Wing House)
Neenah 2-story French Renaissance-styled house overlooking Lake Winnebago, designed by Childs & Smith and built in 1918 for George Gaylord of the Menasha Carton Company and Menasha Paper Company. Later bought by William Wing of the Fox River Paper Company.[145]
86 Winnebago County Courthouse
Winnebago County Courthouse
June 23, 1982
(#82000736)
415 Jackson St.
44°01′17″N 88°32′35″W / 44.021389°N 88.543056°W / 44.021389; -88.543056 (Winnebago County Courthouse)
Oshkosh 5-story Moderne-styled courthouse designed by Frank Venning of Granger & Bollenbacher of Chicago.[146]
87 Wisconsin Avenue Historic District
Wisconsin Avenue Historic District
June 14, 1984
(#84003827)
106-226 W. Wisconsin Ave. and 110 Church St.
44°11′14″N 88°27′47″W / 44.187222°N 88.463056°W / 44.187222; -88.463056 (Wisconsin Avenue Historic District)
Neenah The old commercial heart of Neenah,[147] including the 1858 Wheeler & Leavens Block, a.k.a. Sorenson & Son Furniture,[148] the 1866 Jandrey dry good store,[149] the 1883 Queen Anne-styled Sherry's Post Office Block,[150] the 1894 Romanesque-styled Winnebago Paper Company Office, and the 1934 Art Deco Northwestern Distributing Company Store and Manufactury.[151]
88 Wisconsin National Life Insurance Building
Wisconsin National Life Insurance Building
April 29, 1982
(#82000737)
220 Washington Ave.
44°01′04″N 88°32′03″W / 44.017778°N 88.534167°W / 44.017778; -88.534167 (Wisconsin National Life Insurance Building)
Oshkosh Neoclassical office building with four colossal columns in front, decorated with relief sculpture. Designed by Auler and Jensen and built in 1927.[152] Used by Winnebago County in 2008.

Former listings[edit]

[5] Name on the Register Image Date listed Date removed Location City or town Summary
1 Amos House Upload image
June 1, 1982
(#82000730)
August 17, 1989
1157 High Ave.
Oshkosh Greek Revival home with a full one-story porch, built in 1866. Frank Amos was a teamster and partner in lumber companies.[153]
2 Buckstaff Observatory
Buckstaff Observatory
May 17, 1979
(#79000119)
November 2, 2012
2119 N. Main St.
44°02′38″N 88°32′18″W / 44.043889°N 88.538333°W / 44.043889; -88.538333 (Buckstaff Observatory)
Oshkosh Private observatory built around 1924 by amateur astronomer Ralph Buckstaff of Buckstaff Furniture, from which he studied sunspots, discovered the variable star Yi 1256, and took observations for the US Weather Service for over 50 years.[154] Dismantled and moved in 2011.[155][156]
3 Menasha City Hall
Menasha City Hall
March 15, 1984
(#84003826)
February 17, 1989
124 Main St.
Menasha Late Victorian Gothic public building designed by Charles Hove and built in 1885. Initially housed city offices, fire department, jail and council chambers.[157] Demolished in 1988.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The latitude and longitude information provided in this table was derived originally from the National Register Information System, which has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. For about 1% of NRIS original coordinates, experience has shown that one or both coordinates are typos or otherwise extremely far off; some corrections may have been made. A more subtle problem causes many locations to be off by up to 150 yards, depending on location in the country: most NRIS coordinates were derived from tracing out latitude and longitudes off of USGS topographical quadrant maps created under the North American Datum of 1927, which differs from the current, highly accurate WGS84 GPS system used by most on-line maps. Chicago is about right, but NRIS longitudes in Washington are higher by about 4.5 seconds, and are lower by about 2.0 seconds in Maine. Latitudes differ by about 1.0 second in Florida. Some locations in this table may have been corrected to current GPS standards.
  2. ^ a b National Park Service (2008-04-24). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  3. ^ "Public Enemies". Oshkosh Public Library. Retrieved 2009-10-25. 
  4. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on May 19, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  6. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  7. ^ Miller, Elizabeth L. (1993-07-20). "Algoma Boulevard Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  8. ^ "Charles Kohlman House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  9. ^ "Henry Anthes; Martin Anthes; Louis Schneider". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  10. ^ "Charles Wood House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  11. ^ "Ideson-Osborn House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  12. ^ "Moses Hooper House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  13. ^ "Barney Philh. and Caroline Sawyer House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  14. ^ "Louis and Floretta Schriber House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  15. ^ "Steven Hunt House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  16. ^ "Glen and Emma Converse House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  17. ^ "Algoma Boulevard Methodist Church". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-16. 
  18. ^ Mulvey, Jeffrey H.; Adams, Peter J. (1985-08-15). "Gustav Augustin Block" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-04. 
  19. ^ Anderson, Donald N. (1974-02-20). "Babcock, Havilah, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-21. 
  20. ^ "Havilah Babcock House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-21. 
  21. ^ Adams, Peter J. (1996-03-03). "Banta, George Sr., and Ellen, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-04. 
  22. ^ Adams, Peter J. (2006-11-15). "Beals, Edward D. and Vina Shattuck, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-21. 
  23. ^ Adams, Peter J. (2006-11-15). "Bergstrom, George O., House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-21. 
  24. ^ Vogel, John N. (1986-11-30). "Black Oak School" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-25. 
  25. ^ Steele, Dorothy (September 1981). "Bowen, Abraham Briggs, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-18. 
  26. ^ Mulvey, Jeffrey H.; Adams, Peter J. (1985-08-15). "Brin Building" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-04. 
  27. ^ Hundt Rankin, Katherine (1994-11-01). "Brooklyn No. 4 Fire House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-21. 
  28. ^ Adams, Peter J. (1992-06-15). "Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-25. 
  29. ^ Farnsley, Louise (1977-06-01). "Cole Watch Tower" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-16. 
  30. ^ Steele, Dorothy; Causier, Charles (September 1981). "The Daily Northwestern Building" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-21. 
  31. ^ Schnell, Traci E. (June 2004). "East Forest Avenue Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-25. 
  32. ^ "Syme-Gilbert House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-26. 
  33. ^ "Gilbert Lachmann House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-26. 
  34. ^ "Pfeiffer-Kimberley House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-26. 
  35. ^ "Truman J. Seiler House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-26. 
  36. ^ "Willard Bellack House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-26. 
  37. ^ "Equitable Fraternal Union Building". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-01-29. 
  38. ^ Henninger, Allan T. (1975-12-03). "Eureka Lock and Lock Tender's House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-29. 
  39. ^ Jones, Meg (2012-08-13). "Eureka lock reopens a window to the past". Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel. Retrieved 2015-06-29. 
  40. ^ Miller, Elizabeth L. (1993-09-30). "First Methodist Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-21. 
  41. ^ Engel, Charlene Stant (1974-09-05). "First Presbyterian Church" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-21. 
  42. ^ "Fraternal Reserve Association Building". Photograph Record. Oshkosh Public Museum. Retrieved 2016-02-13. 
  43. ^ "Fraternal Reserve Association". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-02-13. 
  44. ^ Steele, Dorothy (September 1981). "The Frontenac Flats" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-22. 
  45. ^ "Frontenac (Flats)". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-22. 
  46. ^ Adams, Peter J. (1986-04-30). "Hans Gram House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-29. 
  47. ^ Anderson, Donald N. (1973-07-09). "Grand Loggery" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-29. 
  48. ^ Faulkner, Dr. Alaric; Lewis, Ernest R. (1974-11-30). "Augustin Grignon Hotel" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-14. 
  49. ^ Baker, Dr. Bruce N. (November 1983). "Guenther, Richard, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-22. 
  50. ^ Adams, Peter J. (1995-10-28). "Hawks, Frank Winchester, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-29. 
  51. ^ Donath, David A. (July 1978). "Jessie Jack Hooper House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-25. 
  52. ^ Miller, Elizabeth L. (1992-08-03). "Irving-Church Historic District" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  53. ^ "Edward R. Jones House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  54. ^ "George Rogers House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  55. ^ "Stephen and Mary Radford House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  56. ^ "John and Katherine Davis House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  57. ^ "Carlton and Marion Foster House". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  58. ^ "609 Jackson St". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  59. ^ "Leo and Esther Zielke house". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-04-28. 
  60. ^ Cummings, Gail; Kidd, Mary; Adams, Peter J. (1988-02-01). "Jennings, Ellis, House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-07-03. 
  61. ^ Adams, Peter J. (2002-07-15). "Jersild, Reverend Jens N., House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-07-03. 
  62. ^ "Midwest Archaeological Conference - abstracts" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-07-03. 
  63. ^ Adams, Peter J. (1995-02-25). "Kerwin, Judge J. C., House" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-07-03. 
  64. ^ "Kimberly Point Park Lighthouse". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-07-03. 
  65. ^ Mulvey, Jeffrey H.; Adams, Peter J. (1985-08-15). "Carl Koch Block" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. US Dept. of the Interior. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-06-10. 
  66. ^ Adams, Peter J. (1983-10-06). "Larson Brothers Airport" (PDF). NRHP Inventory-Nomination Form. National Park Service. Retrieved 2015-07-07. 
  67. ^ "Lasley Point Archeological Site". Winnebago County - Parks Department. Retrieved 2015-07-07. 
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