National Society for Women's Suffrage

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The National Society for Women's Suffrage Manchester Branch

The National Society for Women's Suffrage was the first national group in the United Kingdom to campaign for women's right to vote. Formed on 6 November 1867, by Lydia Becker, the organisation helped lay the foundations of the women's suffrage movement.[1]

Eliza Wigham, Jane Wigham and some of their friends set up an Edinburgh chapter of this National Society. Eliza and her friend Agnes McLaren became the secretaries,.[2]

Jacob Bright's suggested in 1871 that it would be useful to create a London based organisation to lobby members of parliament concerning women's suffrage. The Central Committee of the National Society for Women's Suffrage first met on 17 January 1872.[3]

The national society was furthered later by the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies and the Women's Social and Political Union.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Early Suffrage Societies in the 19th century - a timeline". UK Parliament. Retrieved 2017-10-03.
  2. ^ National Society of Women's Suffrage. Examiner; 14 January 1871; 3285; British Periodicals pg 55
  3. ^ "The Early Suffrage Societies in the 19th century - a timeline". UK Parliament. Retrieved 2018-01-05.

See also[edit]