National Youth Leadership Council

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
National Youth Leadership Council
Nylc black full.jpg
Logo of National Youth Leadership Council
Abbreviation NYLC
Formation 1983
Type Youth organization
Legal status Non-profit organization
Headquarters St. Paul, MN
Location
CEO
Kelita Svoboda Bak
Mission The mission of the National Youth Leadership Council is to create a more just, sustainable, and peaceful world with young people, their schools, and their communities through service-learning.
Website National Youth Leadership Council

The National Youth Leadership Council, or NYLC, is a national nonprofit organization located in Saint Paul, Minnesota that promotes service-learning in schools and communities across the United States. Founded in 1983 by Dr. James Kielsmeier, NYLC is the host of the annual National Service-Learning Conference. The organization is a proponent of service-learning and national service in the United States.[1]

History[edit]

Founded in 1983, to "create a more just, sustainable, and peaceful world with young people, their schools, and their communities through service-learning".[2] The National Youth Leadership Council began hosting the National Service-Learning Conference in 1989.[3] In 1993 the organization became the main training and technical assistance for the Corporation for National Service focused on service learning.[4]

Programs[edit]

NYLC publishes an annual research publication, Growing to Greatness that seeks to document the scope, scale, and impacts of service-learning. Five full editions are now in print, published every year since 2004. Each edition features a series of topical research articles from leading scholars in the field as well as qualitative profiles of several U.S. states and territories and, increasingly, state-by-state data on service-learning and positive youth contributions.[5]

In 2008, NYLC released the K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice that detail the eight standards of quality service-learning, with three to five accompanying indicators for each standard. The standards are the result of a national review process that began with research from the field and vetted the previously-published Essential Elements of Service-Learning through a series of reactor panels to arrive at the final document.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kielsmeier, J.C. and Scheibel, J. (2008) "Service Learning: An On-Ramp to National Service", Education Week. Retrieved 11/1/08.
  2. ^ "History", Learn and Serve America's National Service Learning Clearinghouse. Retrieved 11/1/08.
  3. ^ "National Youth Leadership Council", State Farm. Retrieved 11/1/08.
  4. ^ "National Youth Leadership Council", America's Promise. Retrieved 11/1/08.
  5. ^ "Service Learning: What have we learned?", Youth Today. Retrieved 11/1/08.
  6. ^ National Youth Leadership Council. (2008) K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice. Saint Paul: Author.

External links[edit]