National identity cards in the European Economic Area

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Czech national ID card EPassport logo.svg
EEA and Switzerland

National identity cards are issued to their citizens by the governments of all European Union member states except Denmark, Ireland (Public Services Card) and the United Kingdom, and also by Liechtenstein and Switzerland (the latter not formally part of the EEA). Citizens holding a national identity card, which states EEA or Swiss citizenship, can not only use it as an identity document within their home country, but also as a travel document to exercise the right of free movement in the EEA and Switzerland.[1] Identity cards that do not state EEA or Swiss citizenship, including national identity cards issued to residents who are not citizens, are not valid as a travel document within the EEA and Switzerland.

National identity cards are often accepted in other parts of the world for unofficial identification purposes (such as age verification in commercial establishments that serve or sell alcohol, or checking in at hotels) and sometimes for official purposes such as proof of identity/nationality to authorities (especially machine-readable cards).

Four EEA member states do not issue cards defined by EU as national identity cards to their citizens: Denmark, Iceland, Norway and the United Kingdom (except to residents of Gibraltar); although Norway is expected to start issuing such cards from 1 April 2018.[2] At present, citizens from these four countries can only use a passport as a travel document when travelling between EEA member states, and Switzerland. However, when travelling within the Schengen Area or Common Travel Area, other valid identity documentation (such as a driving licence or EHIC card) is often sufficient.[3] Ireland issues a passport card which is valid as national identity card in other EU countries.[4]

Use[edit]

Travel document[edit]

As an alternative to presenting a passport, EEA and Swiss citizens are entitled to use a valid national identity card as a travel document to exercise their right of free movement in the European Economic Area and Switzerland.

Strictly speaking, it is not necessary for an EEA or Swiss citizen to possess a valid national identity card or passport to enter the EEA or Switzerland. In theory, if an EEA or Swiss citizen outside of both the EEA and Switzerland can prove their nationality by any other means (e.g. by presenting an expired national identity card or passport, or a citizenship certificate), they must be permitted to enter the EEA or Switzerland. An EEA or Swiss citizen who is unable to demonstrate their nationality satisfactorily must, nonetheless, be given 'every reasonable opportunity' to obtain the necessary documents or to have them delivered within a reasonable period of time.[5][6][7]

Additionally, EEA and Swiss citizens can enter a number of countries and territories outside the EEA and Switzerland on the strength of their national identity cards alone, without the need to present a passport to the border authorities (although Swedish and Finnish law does not allow their own citizens to travel outside the EEA/Switzerland without a passport, in practice meaning that direct outbound travel from Sweden/Finland to such countries with only an ID card is not possible):

1. Unlike Gibraltar, the British overseas territory of Akrotiri and Dhekelia and the British Crown Dependencies of Guernsey, the Isle of Man and Jersey are not part of the European Union. Nonetheless, EEA and Swiss citizens are able to use their national identity cards as travel documents to enter all of these territories.
2. Monaco is de facto part of the Schengen Area under an arrangement with France, while San Marino and Vatican City are enclaves of Italy with open land borders. Further information: Schengen Area § Status of the European microstates.
3. EEA and Swiss citizens can use their national identity cards when travelling directly between mainland Europe (usually France) and French overseas territories.[23][24][25][25][26][27] In practice, the only French overseas departments/collectivities which can be reached directly by plane from mainland Europe are French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte and Réunion. In addition, EEA and Swiss citizens can use their national identity cards when travelling within/between French overseas territories (e.g. when flying directly between Guadeloupe and Saint Martin).
4. The national ID card must be in card format.
5. Applies only to EU citizens, and the national ID card must be biometric.
6. Applies only to EU citizens.
7. Applies only to EU citizens (except Croatians) and only when arriving through Aqaba airport on a flight from Brussels.
8. Not applicable to nationals of Liechtenstein
9. Not applicable to nationals of Croatia. Except for nationals of France, who are granted the full 6-month visa-free period with an ID card, EEA/Swiss nationals using an ID card may only stay for up to 14 days

Turkey allows citizens of Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland to enter using a national identity card.[28] Egypt allows citizens of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Portugal to enter using a national identity card with a minimum remaining period of validity of 6 months.[29][30] Tunisia allows nationals of Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland to enter using a national identity card if travelling on an organized tour. Anguilla, Dominica and Saint Lucia allow nationals of France to enter using a national ID card, while Dominica de facto also allows nationals of (at least) Germany and Sweden to enter with a national ID card (as of March 2016). Gambia allows nationals of Belgium to enter using a national ID card.[31] Finally, Greenland allows Nordic citizens to enter with a national ID card (only Sweden and Finland have them, whereas Norway will introduce them in 2018). In practice, all EEA and Swiss citizens can use their ID cards, because no passport control takes place on arrival in Greenland, only by the airline at check-in and the gate, and both Air Greenland and Air Iceland accept any EEA or Swiss ID card.

Although, as a matter of European law, holders of a Swedish national identity card are entitled to use it as a travel document to any European Union member state (regardless of whether it belongs to the Schengen Area or not), Swedish national law did not recognise the card as a valid travel document outside the Schengen Area until July 2015[32] in direct violation of European law. What this meant in practice was that leaving Schengen directly from Sweden (i.e., without making a stopover in another Schengen country) with the card was not possible. This partially changed in July 2015, when travel to non-Schengen countries in the EU (but not others, even if they accept the ID card) was permitted.[33]

Similarly, Finnish citizens cannot leave Finland directly for a non EU/EFTA country with only their ID cards.[34]

UK Border Force officials have been known to place extra scrutiny on and to spend longer processing national identity cards issued by certain member states which are deemed to have limited security features and hence more susceptible to tampering/forgery. Unlike their counterparts in the Schengen Area (who, under the previous legal regime in force until 7 April 2017, were obliged to perform a 'rapid' and 'straightforward' visual check for signs of falsification and tampering, and were not obliged to use technical devices – such as document scanners, UV light and magnifiers – when EEA and Swiss citizens presented their passports and/or national identity cards at external border checkpoints),[35] as a matter of policy UKBF officials are required to examine physically all passports and national identity cards presented by EEA and Swiss citizens for signs of forgery and tampering.[36] In addition, unlike their counterparts in the Schengen Area (who, under the previous legal regime in force until 7 April 2017, when presented with a passport or national identity card by an EEA or Swiss citizen, were not legally obliged to check it against a database of lost/stolen/invalidated travel documents – and, if they did so, could only perform a 'rapid' and 'straightforward' database check – and could only check to see if the traveller is on a database containing persons of interest on a strictly 'non-systematic' basis where such a threat was 'genuine', 'present' and 'sufficiently serious'),[35] as a matter of policy UKBF officials are required to check every EEA and Swiss citizen and their passport/national identity card against the Warnings Index (WI) database[36] (note, however, that with effect from 7 April 2017, it is now mandatory for border officials in the Schengen Area to check on a systematic basis the travel documents of all EEA and Swiss citizens crossing external borders against relevant databases).[37] For this reason, when presented with a non-machine readable identity card, it can take up to four times longer for a UKBF official to process the card as the official has to enter the biographical details of the holder manually into the computer to check against the WI database and, if a large number of possible matches is returned, a different configuration has to be entered to reduce the number of possible matches.[38] For example, at Stansted Airport UKBF officials have been known to take longer to process Italian paper identity cards because they often need to be taken out of plastic wallets,[39] because they are particularly susceptible to forgery/tampering[40] and because, as non-machine readable documents, the holders' biographical details have to be entered manually into the computer.[39]

According to statistics published by Frontex, in 2015 the top 6 EU member states whose national identity cards were falsified and detected at external border crossing points of the Schengen Area were Italy, Spain, Belgium, Greece, France and Romania.[41] These countries remained the top 6 in 2016.[42]

Identification document[edit]

Identity documentation requirements for citizens
  National identity card required
  Some form of identity documentation required
  Identity documentation optional
Usage in own country

There are varying rules on domestic usage of identity documents. Some countries demand the usage of the national identity card or a passport. Other countries allow usage of other documents like driver's licenses.

In some countries, e.g. Austria, Finland and Sweden, national identity cards are fully voluntary and not needed by everyone, as identity documents like driver's licences are accepted domestically. In these countries only a minority have a national identity card, since a majority have a passport and a driver's licence and don't need more identity documents. This is so also for Ireland where those who have a passport and a driver's licence have less need for the passport card.

Usage outside own country

EEA and Swiss citizens exercising their right to free movement in another EEA member state or Switzerland are entitled to use their national identity card as an identification document when dealing not just with government authorities, but also with private sector service providers. For example, where a supermarket in the UK refuses to accept a German national identity card as proof of age when a German citizen attempts to purchase an age-restricted product and insists on the production of a UK-issued passport or driving licence or other identity document, the supermarket would, in effect, be discriminating against this individual on this basis of his/her nationality in the provision of a service, thereby contravening the prohibition in Art 20(2) of Directive 2006/123/EC of discriminatory treatment relating to the nationality of a service recipient in the conditions of access to a service which are made available to the public at large by a service provider.[43]

On 11 June 2014, The Guardian published leaked internal documents from HM Passport Office in the UK which revealed that government officials who dealt with British passport applications sent from overseas treated EU citizen counter-signatories differently depending on their nationality. The leaked internal documents showed that for citizens of Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia and Sweden who acted as a counter-signatory to support the application for a British passport made by someone whom they knew, HM Passport Office would be willing to accept a copy of the counter-signatory's passport or the national identity card.[44] HM Passport Office considered that national identity cards issued to citizens of these member states were acceptable taking into account the 'quality of the identity card design, the rigour of their issuing process, the relatively low level of documented abuse of such documents at UK/Schengen borders and our ability to access samples of such identity cards for comparison purposes'. In contrast, citizens of other EU member states (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Romania and Spain) acting as counter-signatories could only submit a copy of their passport and not their national identity card to prove their identity as national identity cards issued by these member states were deemed by HM Passport Office to be less secure and more susceptible to fraud/forgery. The day following the revelations, on 12 June 2014, the Home Office and HM Passport Office withdrew the leaked internal guidance relating to EU citizen counter-signatories submitting a copy of their national identity card instead of their passport as proof of identity, and all EU citizen counter-signatories are now able only to submit a copy of their passport and not of their national identity card.[45][46]

Common design and security features[edit]

On 13 July 2005, the Justice and Home Affairs Council called on all European Union member states to adopt common designs and security features for national identity cards by December 2005, with detailed standards being laid out as soon as possible thereafter.[47]

On 4 December 2006, all European Union member states agreed to adopt the following common designs and minimum security standards for national identity cards that were in the draft resolution of 15 November 2006:[48][49]

Material

The card can be made with paper core that is laminated on both sides or made entirely of a synthetic substrate.

Biographical data

The data on the card shall contain at least: name, gender, birth date, nationality, a photo, signature, card number, start and end date of validity.[50] Some cards contain more information such as height, eye colour, issue place or province, and birth place.

The biographical data on the card is to be machine readable and follow the ICAO specification for machine-readable travel documents.

The EU Regulation revising the Schengen Borders Code (which entered into force on 7 April 2017 and introduced systematic checks of the travel documents of EU, EEA and Swiss citizens against relevant databases when entering and leaving the Schengen Area) states that all member states should phase out travel documents (including national identity cards) which are not machine-readable.[51]

However, as of 2017, Greece continues to issue solely non-machine readable identity cards, while Italy is in the process of phasing out the issuing of non-machine readable paper booklets in favour of biometric cards.

Electronic identity cards[edit]

All EEA electronic identity cards should comply with the ISO/IEC standard 14443. Effectively this means that all these cards should implement electromagnetic coupling between the card and the card reader and, if the specifications are followed, are only capable of being read from proximities of less than 0.1 metres.[52]

They are not the same as the RFID tags often seen in stores and attached to livestock. Neither will they work at the relatively large distances typically seen at US toll booths or automated border crossing channels.[53]

The same ICAO specifications adopted by nearly all European passport booklets (Basic Access Control - BAC) means that miscreants should not be able to read these cards[54] unless they also have physical access to the card.[55] BAC authentication keys derive from the three lines of data printed in the MRZ on the obverse of each TD1 format identity card that begins "I".

According to the ISO 14443 standard, wireless communication with the card reader can not start until the identity card's chip has transmitted a unique identifier. Theoretically an ingenious attacker who has managed to secrete multiple reading devices in a distributed array (eg in arrival hall furniture) could distinguish bearers of MROTDs without having access to the relevant chip files. In concert with other information, this attacker might then be able to produce profiles specific to a particular card and, consequently its bearer. Defence is a trivial task when most electronic cards make new and randomised UIDs during every session [NH08] to preserve a level of privacy more comparable with contact cards than commercial RFID tags.[56]

The electronic identity cards of Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, Germany,[57] Italy, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Portugal and Spain all have a digital signature application which, upon activation, enables the bearer to authenticate the card using their confidential PIN.[citation needed] Consequently they can, at least theoretically, authenticate documents to satisfy any third party that the document's not been altered after being digitally signed. This application uses a registered certificate in conjunction with public/private key pairs so these enhanced cards do not necessarily have to participate in online transactions.[58]

An unknown number of national European identity cards are issued with different functionalities for authentication while online. Some also have an additional contact chip containing their electronic signature functionality, such as the Swedish national identity card.[56]

Portugal's card had an EMV application but it was removed in newer versions from 16 January 2016.[59][60]

Overview of national identity cards[edit]

Member states issue a variety of national identity cards with differing technical specifications and according to differing issuing procedures.[61]

Member state Front Reverse Compulsory/optional Cost Validity Issuing authority Latest version
Austria
Austria
Austrian ID card.jpg Austrian identity card back.png Identity documentation is optional
  • €61.50 (applicants aged 16 or over)
  • €26.30 (children aged 2–15)
  • Free of charge (children under 2)
  • 10 years (applicants aged 12 or over)
  • 5 years (children aged 2–11)
  • 2 years (children under 2)
3 May 2010
Belgium
Belgium
EPassport logo.svg
Belgium ID 2010 (dutch).jpg Belgium ID 2010 (dutch, verso).jpg National identity card compulsory for Belgian citizens aged 12 or over
  • Differs per city
  • equivalent of €11 or €17 in local currency (citizens registered abroad)
  • 6 years (for applicants aged between 12 and 18)
  • 10 years (for old style ID cards issued by Belgian consulates, or for applicants aged 18 to 75)
  • 30 years (for applicants aged over 75)
  • Municipal administration (of place of residence)
  • Consulate (citizens registered abroad)
12 December 2013
Bulgaria
Bulgaria
EPassport logo.svg[62]
Bulgarian identity card.png Bulgarian identity card back.png National identity card compulsory for Bulgarian citizens aged 14 or over
  • first card free (age 14-16)
  • €6.5 (age 14-18)
  • €9 (age 18-58)
  • €5.5 (age 58-70)
  • free (age >70)
  • Prices are for a 30-day issue, multiply by 2 for 3 day issue, by 5 for 8 hours.
  • No expiry (adults aged 58 or over)
  • 10 years (adults aged 18–57)
  • 4 years (children aged 14–17)
The police on behalf of the Ministry of the Interior. 29 March 2010
Croatia
Croatia
EPassport logo.svg
Osobna iskaznica 2015 - prednja strana.jpg Osobna iskaznica 2013 - poleđina 01.jpg National identity card compulsory for Croatian citizens resident in Croatia aged 18 or over HRK 79.50[63]
  • 5 years
The police on behalf of the Ministry of the Interior.[64] 8 June 2015
Cyprus
Cyprus
EPassport logo.svg
National identity card compulsory for Cypriot citizens aged 12 or over
  • €30 (applicants aged 18 or over)
  • €20 (children under 18)
  • 10 years
  • 5 years (applicants under 18)
24 February 2015
Czech Republic
Czech Republic
EPassport logo.svg
ID-card CZ 2012.jpg ID-card CZ 2012 b chip.jpg National identity card compulsory for Czech citizens over 15 years of age with permanent residency in the Czech Republic
  • the version without a chip is free for permanent residents over 15 years of age (first card, renewal or a reissue due to a change in permanent residency, name or marital status)
  • 100 CZK for reissue for all other reasons (no chip)
  • 50 CZK (children under 15 years of age, no chip)
  • 500 CZK for all ID cards with an electronic chip for all reasons
  • 100 CZK for a temporary ID without machine readable data with 1 or 3 months validity
  • 10 years (applicants aged 15 or over)
  • 5 years (children aged under 15)
municipality on behalf of the Ministry of the Interior 19 May 2014
Denmark
Denmark
No national identity card (See Identity document#Denmark). Identity documentation is optional N/A N/A N/A N/A
Estonia
Estonia
Estonian identity card front.png Estonian identity card reverse.png National identity card compulsory for all Estonian citizens and permanent residents aged 15 or over
  • €25 (applicants aged 15 or over) or €50 (in embassies)[65]
  • €7 (children under 15, retirees, persons with disabilities) or €10 (in embassies)
  • €45 (urgent)
5 years Police and Border Guard Board 1 January 2011
Finland
Finland
EPassport logo.svg
Finnish identity card.png Finnish identity card back.png Identity documentation is optional
  • €53 (applicants aged 18 or over)[66]
  • €36 (children under 18)
5 years Police 31 May 2011
France
France
Identity documentation is legally optional but the police has extensive powers to check a person's identity in many situations, up to 4-hour detention to make the necessary verification and take a photograph.
  • Free of charge
  • €25 (if the previous one cannot be presented, e.g., it was lost or stolen)
  • 10 years for minors
  • 15 years for adults.
  • Police (Paris)
  • mairie (town hall) in the town of residence (France, except Paris)
  • French consulate (overseas)
1 October 1994
Germany
Germany
EPassport logo.svg
Mustermann nPA.jpg Mustermann nPA RS.jpg National identity card optional; however, a national identity card or passport is compulsory for German citizens aged 16 or over, and valid identity documentation is compulsory for other EEA citizens
  • €28.80 (applicants aged 24 or over)
  • €22.80 (applicants aged under 24)
  • 10 years (applicants aged 24 or over)
  • 6 years (applicants aged under 24)
City or town of residence 1 November 2010
Gibraltar
Gibraltar
EPassport logo.svg
Identity documentation is optional Free of charge
  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
Civil Status and Registration Office, Gibraltar 8 December 2000
Greece
Greece
Greek ID Card-Front.jpg
Greek ID Card-Back.jpg
National identity card compulsory for Greek citizens aged 12 or over
  • Free of charge for first issue
  • €9 for reissue if lost or destroyed (free if reported stolen)
15 years Police 1 July 2010
Hungary
Hungary
EPassport logo.svg
HunIDfront.jpg HunIDback.jpg National identity card optional; however, a national identity card, passport or driving licence is compulsory for Hungarian citizens aged 14
  • Free of charge
  • 60 years (adults aged 65 or over)
  • 6 years (adults aged over 18)
  • 3 years (children under 18, but only until the date on which the holder reaches the age of 12)
1 January 2016
Iceland
Iceland
No national identity card. Icelandic state-issued identity cards and driver's licenses do not state nationality and therefore are not usable as travel documentation outside of the Nordic countries. Identity documentation compulsory for all persons. N/A N/A N/A N/A
Republic of Ireland
Ireland
EPassport logo.svg
Identity documentation is optional. New identity card exists since the end of the year 2015 called "passport card". It is an optional extra that can be purchased by Irish passport holders for easy identification and travel within the EEA[67][68]
  • €35 + must also hold passport book (€80)
  • 5 years maximum validity, or until the expiry date of the Passport Book (whichever comes first)
Passport Office, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 2 October 2015
Italy
Italy
EPassport logo.svg (only the electronic version)
Carta identita italiana.jpg
Italian electronic ID card.png
From 4 July 2016, tools to issue a new electronic card are planned to be extended to all municipalities until 2018.
Italian electronic ID card (back).png
National identity card optional, however, citizens should be able to prove their identity if stopped by territorial police
  • €5.42 for paper IDs (if lost, stolen or deteriorated price may vary depending on town hall)
  • €22.21 for electronic IDs (if lost, stolen or deteriorated price may vary depending on town hall)
  • 3 years (applicants aged up to 3)
  • 5 year (applicants aged 3–18)
  • 10 years (adults aged 18 or over)
Town Hall 4 July 2016
Latvia
Latvia
EPassport logo.svg
National identity card optional; however, a national identity card or passport is compulsory for Latvian citizens aged 15 or over
  • €14.23
  • €7.11 (citizens under age of 20, retirees)
5 years Office of Citizenship and Migration Affairs 1 April 2012
Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
Identity documentation is optional
  • CHF80 (adults aged 15 or over)
  • CHF30 (children under 15)
  • 10 years (adults aged 15 or over)
  • 3 years (children under 15)
Immigration and Passport Office, Vaduz 23 June 2008
Lithuania
Lithuania
EPassport logo.svg
Identity documentation is optional
  • €8.6
  • 10 years (adults aged 16 or over)
  • 5 years (children under 16)
Police 1 January 2009
Luxembourg
Luxembourg
EPassport logo.svg
National identity card compulsory for Luxembourgian citizens resident in Luxembourg aged 15 or over
  • 10 years (applicants aged 15 or over)
  • 5 years (children aged 4–14)
  • 2 years (children under 4)
1 July 2014 [69]
Malta
Malta
EPassport logo.svg
National identity card compulsory for Maltese citizens aged 18 or over
  • First time issuance of Identity Card: Free
  • Renewal of expired Identity Card (or containing any data that is no longer correct) which are not declared to be lost, stolen or defaced: Free
  • Applications for a new Identity Card in replacement of one which has been lost, stolen or destroyed: €20
  • Applications for a new Identity Card in replacement of one which has been defaced: €15
  • 10 years
  • Identity Management Office

12 February 2014

Netherlands
Netherlands
EPassport logo.svg
National identity card optional;, however, valid identity documentation is compulsory for all persons aged 14 or over
  • €28.45 (applicants aged 13 or younger[70])
  • €53.05 (applicants aged 14 or older[70])
  • €66.35 (applicants aged 13 or younger abroad[71])
  • €90.95 (applicants aged 14 or older abroad[71])
  • 5 years[72]
  • 10 years (From 2014 onwards)[73]
  • Town hall in town of residence (European part of the Netherlands)
  • Consular section of Embassy abroad (only in countries in which the Dutch ID card is a valid travel document)
  • Dutch nationals, residing on the Dutch Caribbean islands, although also EU citizens, can only apply for a specific ID card issued by the island's authorities. These cards are not valid for travel in the EU.
9 October 2011
Norway
Norway
No national identity card currently; however, planned to be introduced on 1 April 2018.[74][75][2] Identity documentation is optional Norwegian Police Service 1 April 2018
Poland
Poland
Dowod2015.png
Dowod2015.png
National identity card compulsory for Polish citizens resident in Poland aged 18 or over Free of charge
  • 10 years (adults aged over 18)
  • 10 years (children over 5)
  • 5 years (children under 5)
Wójt/Mayor/President of the City 1 March 2015
Portugal
Portugal
EPassport logo.svg
Cartão de Cidadão Português.jpg CDC4.png National identity card (called "Citizen Card") compulsory for Portuguese citizens aged 6 or over
  • Normal service delivered in Portugal: €15
  • Normal service delivered outside Portugal: €20
  • Expedited service delivered in Portugal: €30
  • Expedited service delivered outside Portugal: €45
  • Same day delivery with pick-up at IRN desk in Lisbon: €35
  • 10 years (adults aged over 25)
  • 5 years (applicants under 25)
Notary and Registry Institute (IRN) 1 June 2009
Romania
Romania
EPassport logo.svg
Romania ID 2009.jpg National identity card compulsory for Romanian citizens aged 14 or over 12 RON to issue a new or a renewal card
  • No expiry (adults aged 55 or over)
  • 10 years (adults aged 25–54)
  • 7 years (adults aged 18–24)
  • 4 years (minors aged 14–17)
Police station in proximity 12 May 2009
Slovakia
Slovakia
Slovak ID card 2015.jpg
Slovak ID card 2015.jpg
National identity card compulsory for Slovak citizens aged 15 or over Free of charge
  • No expiry (adults aged 60 or over)
  • 10 years
1 December 2013
Slovenia
Slovenia
National identity card optional; however, a form of ID with photo is compulsory for Slovenian citizens permanently resident in Slovenia aged 18 or over
  • €12.43 (children under the age of 3)
  • €14.25 (children aged 3–18)
  • €18.77 (applicants aged 18 and over)
  • 3 years (citizens under 3 years)
  • 5 years (citizens under 18 years)
  • 10 years (citizens over 18 years)
  • Administrative Unit
  • Ministry of Home Affairs
  • Ministry of Foreign Affairs
20 June 1998
Spain
Spain
EPassport logo.svg
DNIe3.0 Spanish ID Card.png
DNIe3.0 Spanish ID Card.png
National identity card compulsory for Spanish citizens aged 14 or over €11
  • No expiry (adults over 70)
  • 10 years (adults aged 30–70)
  • 5 years (applicants under 30)
Police 20 January 2016
Sweden
Sweden
EPassport logo.svg
Identity documentation is optional SEK 400 5 years Police 2 January 2012
Switzerland
Switzerland
Identity documentation is optional
  • CHF 70 (adults)
  • CHF 35 (children)
  • 10 years (adults)
  • 5 years (children)
1 November 2005
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
No UK national identity card (UK ID Cards abolished 2011 by UK Identity Documents Act 2010), although identity cards can be issued to residents of Gibraltar. British driving licences, which are plastic cards showing a photo of the holder, their date of birth and their home address, are often used as general proof of identity. Identity documentation is optional N/A N/A N/A N/A

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  5. ^ Article 6.3.2 of the Practical Handbook for Border Guards (C (2006) 5186)
  6. ^ Judgement of the European Court of Justice of 17 February 2005, Case C 215/03, Salah Oulane vs. Minister voor Vreemdelingenzaken en Integratie
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  24. ^ "Formalités police et douanes : Aéroport Guadeloupe (caraibes), Informations passagers". 
  25. ^ a b Otidea, Agence Multimedia. "Documents-Formalités - Aéroport de Mayotte". 
  26. ^ "Formatiltés Aéroport Martinique Aimé Césaire - Formalités". 
  27. ^ "Passagers - Aéroport Roland Garros de la Réunion". 
  28. ^ "From Rep. of Turkey Ministry of Foreign Affairs". 
  29. ^ http://www.ibz.rrn.fgov.be/fileadmin/user_upload/CI/eID/fr/acces_etranger/voyager_avec_des_documents_d_identite_belges.pdf
  30. ^ International Ministère des Affaires étrangères et du Développement. "Egypte - Sécurité". diplomatie.gouv.fr. 
  31. ^ http://www.gambiaembassy.be/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=19&Itemid=43
  32. ^ Passlag (1978:302) (See 5§) (Swedish)
  33. ^ Ökade möjligheter att resa inom EU med nationellt identitetskort (Swedish)
  34. ^ "FINLEX ® - Ursprungliga författningar: Statsrådets förordning om styrkande av rätten… 660/2013". 
  35. ^ a b Article 7(2) of the Schengen Borders Code in force until 6 April 2017(OJ L 105, 13 April 2006, p. 1). The amended Schengen Borders Code entered into effect on 7 April 2017: see Regulation (EU) 2017/458 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 March 2017 amending Regulation (EU) 2016/399 as regards the reinforcement of checks against relevant databases at external borders (OJ L 74, 18 March 2017, p.1)
  36. ^ a b Home Office WI Checking Policy and operational instructions issued in June 2007 (see An inspection into border security checks, pg 21 by the Independent Chief Inspector of the UK Border Agency)
  37. ^ Regulation (EU) 2017/458 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 March 2017 amending Regulation (EU) 2016/399 as regards the reinforcement of checks against relevant databases at external borders (OJ L 74, 18 March 2017, p.1)
  38. ^ See An Inspection of Border Force Operations at Stansted Airport, pg 12 by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration
  39. ^ a b "Meeting of the User Experience Group of the Stansted Airport Consultative Committee, held at the Airport on 5 March 2014" (PDF). 2014-06-11. p. 3. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2017-05-07. 
  40. ^ See An Inspection of Border Force Operations at Stansted Airport (table of statistics at 4.13 on pg 12) by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration
  41. ^ See Risk Analysis for 2016 (table of statistics of fraudulent document detected, by main countries of issuance, 2015 on pg 24) by Frontex
  42. ^ See Risk Analysis for 2017 (table of statistics of fraudulent document detected, by main countries of issuance, 2016 on pg 22) by Frontex
  43. ^ "Answer to a written question - Validity of national ID cards - E-004933/2014". 
  44. ^ The Guardian: Passport Office briefing document (11 June 2014) Note that although the list included Switzerland, in practice Swiss citizens would not have been eligible to act as counter-signatories as they are not EU citizens.
  45. ^ "Countersigning passport applications and photos - GOV.UK". 
  46. ^ Syal, Rajeev (11 June 2014). "Ministers intervene to prevent relaxation of checks at Passport Office" – via The Guardian. 
  47. ^ "Council of the European Union: Draft Conclusions of the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States on common minimum security standards for Member States' national identity cards" (PDF). 
  48. ^ "Council of the European Union: Draft Resolution of the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States meeting within the Council on common minimum security standards for Member States' national identity cards" (PDF). 
  49. ^ "List of texts adopted by the Council in the JHA area – 2006" (PDF). 
  50. ^ "Machine Readable Travel Documents - Part 5" (PDF). 
  51. ^ Recital 14 to Regulation (EU) 2017/458 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 March 2017 amending Regulation (EU) 2016/399 as regards the reinforcement of checks against relevant databases at external borders (OJ L 74, 18 March 2017, p.1)
  52. ^ "HM Government Guide" (PDF). 
  53. ^ "Grabba - MRZ Passport - Grabba". 
  54. ^ (DR), FIDISCoord. "D3.6: Study on ID Documents: Future of IDentity in the Information Society". 
  55. ^ Privacy Features of European eID Card Specifications Authors: Ingo Naumann, Giles Hogben of the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA), Technical Department P.O. Box 1309, 71001 Heraklion, Greece. This article originally appeared in the Elsevier Network Security Newsletter, August 2008, ISSN 1353-4858, pp. 9-13
  56. ^ a b Helmbrecht, Udo; Naumann, Ingo (2011). "8: Overview of European Electronic Identity Cards". In Fumy, Walter; Paeschke, Manfred. Handbook of eID Security: Concepts, Practical Experiences, Technologies. II. John Wiley & Sons. p. 109. ISBN 978-3-89578-379-1. 
  57. ^ "Bundesdruckerei" (PDF). 
  58. ^ Helmbrecht, Udo; Naumann, Ingo (2011). "8: Overview of European Electronic Identity Cards". In Fumy, Walter; Paeschke, Manfred. Handbook of eID Security: Concepts, Practical Experiences, Technologies. II. John Wiley & Sons. p. 110. ISBN 978-3-89578-379-1. 
  59. ^ Sniffing with the Portuguese Identify (sic) Card for fun and Profit by Paul Crocker (Institute of Telecommunications, Covilhã, Portugal), Vasco Nicolau & Simão Melo de Sousa of the Universidade da Beira Interior. Conference paper presented at ECIW'2010 describes "a case study of the re-engineering process used to discover the low-level application protocol data units (APDUs) and their associated significance when used in communications with the Portuguese e-id smart card... primarily done simply to learn the processes involved given the low level of documentation available from the Portuguese government concerning the inner workings of the Citizens Card... also done in order to produce a generic platform for accessing and auditing the Portuguese Citizen Card and for using Match-on-Card biometrics for use in different scenarios... The Portuguese government rolled out a new electronic identity card ... called the “Cartão de Cidadão Português” produced by the “Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda” (INCM www.incm.pt). The initial concept of the card was to merge various identification documents into a single electronic smart card and permit the maximum of interoperability between the various entities whilst following Portuguese law." researchgate.net
  60. ^ "Controlo do N.º de Versão, Cartão de Cidadão, REFERÊNCIA DOC 01-DCM-16 V3, 2016-01-20" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-06-14. 
  61. ^ State of play concerning the electronic identity cards in the EU Member States (COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION, 2010)
  62. ^ http://m3web.bg, M3 Web -. "Bulgaria to Start Issuing Biometric IDs in March 2010 - Novinite.com - Sofia News Agency". 
  63. ^ http://www.mup.hr/42.aspx
  64. ^ Zakon o osobnoj iskaznici (in Croatian)
  65. ^ "Isikut tõendavad dokumendid". 
  66. ^ https://www.poliisi.fi/poliisi/home.nsf/www/serviceprice
  67. ^ PRADO - Public Register of Authentic travel and identity Documents Online, consilium.europa.eu. Retrieved 30 October 2015.
  68. ^ FAQ - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, dfa.ie.
  69. ^ "Dan Kersch a présenté la nouvelle carte d'identité électronique - gouvernement.lu // L'actualité du gouvernement du Luxembourg". 
  70. ^ a b Haag, Den. "Nederlandse identiteitskaart". 
  71. ^ a b Haag, Den. "Paspoort en identiteitskaart voor Nederlanders in het buitenland". 
  72. ^ "Paspoort en identiteitskaart". 
  73. ^ "Identiteitskaart wordt 10 jaar geldig". Archived from the original on 21 January 2013. 
  74. ^ NRK. "Lover nasjonalt ID-kort i 2015". 
  75. ^ Nasjonalt ID-kort utsatt igjen (in Norwegian)

External links[edit]