Natural Resource Governance Institute

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Natural Resource Governance Institute
AbbreviationNRGI
Formation2013
Headquarters80 Broad Street, Suite 1801, New York, NY 10004
President
Daniel Kaufmann
Parent organization
Revenue Watch Institute, Natural Resource Charter
Staff
100+
Websitehttps://resourcegovernance.org/

The Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) is an independent nonprofit organisation dedicated to improving countries' governance over their natural resources (in particular oil, gas and minerals) to promote sustainable and inclusive development.[1] The headquarters of NRGI are based in New York.

History[edit]

The Natural Resource Governance Institute was established through the merger of the Revenue Watch Institute and the Natural Resource Charter in 2013.[2] Originally based in New York, NRGI has opened offices in London, Accra, Lima, Washington, D.C., Jakarta and Dar Es Salaam.[3] This partly reflects its focus on Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Indonesia, Mexico Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Tunisia as "priority countries".[4]

Organisation and Activities[edit]

The Natural Resource Governance Institute is led by a president, with Daniel Kaufmann currently serving in that role.[5] Its activities are supervised by a board of directors, with Ernesto Zedillo as chair and Smita Singh as vice-chair.[6] Finally, NRGI's leadership team and its board of directors benefit are supported by an Advisory Council co-chaired by Michael Spence and Joseph Bell.[7] Other prominent figures affiliated with NRGI include Paul Collier, Ernest Aryeetey, Elena Panfilova, Alicia Bárcena Ibarra, Peter Eigen, Antonio La Viña, Ilgar Mammadov, José Antonio Ocampo, Anya Schiffrin, Andrés Velasco, and Tony Venables.

In line with its mission, NRGI supports civil society organisations, government institutions, private sector enterprises, and the media with technical advice, advocacy, applied research, policy analysis, and capacity development with regard to natural resource governance.[8] Key tools developed in that context include for example the 2017 Resource Governance Index, a map of resource projects, the Natural Resource Charter Benchmarking Framework, or the 2010 Revenue Watch Index.[9] Notably, research and resources from NRGI have been featured by international media such as The Atlantic[10], Financial Times[11] or Forbes,[12] as well as national media in the concerned countries.

The Natural Resource Charter[edit]

The Natural Resource Charter is a document aimed at providing advice and policy options with regard to the management of resource wealth in order to help resource-rich countries use their natural resources for sustainable development. NRGI promotes the implementation of the Natural Resource Charter and provides policy advice with regard to this implementation process. The Natural Resource Charter consists of the following 12 Precepts, which are organised into three parts based on the chain of decisions involved in natural resource management:[13]

  • Domestic foundations for resource governance
(1) Resource management should secure the greatest benefit for citizens through an inclusive and comprehensive national strategy, clear legal framework and competent institutions.
(2) Resource governance requires decision makers to be accountable to an informed public.
  • Economic decisions required to manage resources for prosperity
(3) The government should encourage efficient exploration and production operations, and allocate rights transparently.
(4) Tax regimes and contractual terms should enable the government to realize the full value of its resources consistent with attracting necessary investment, and should be robust to changing circumstances.
(5) The government should pursue opportunities for local benefits, and account for, mitigate and offset the environmental and social costs of resource extraction projects.
(6) Nationally owned companies should be accountable, with well-defined mandates and an objective of commercial efficiency.
(7) The government should invest revenues to achieve optimal and equitable outcomes, for current and future generations.
(8) The government should smooth domestic spending of revenues to account for revenue volatility.
(9) The government should use revenue as an opportunity to increase the efficiency of public spending at the national and sub-national levels.
(10) The government should facilitate private sector investments to diversify the economy and to engage in the extractive industry.
  • International foundations for resource governance
(11) Companies should commit to the highest environmental, social and human rights standards, and to sustainable development.
(12) Governments and international organizations should promote an upward harmonization of standards to support sustainable development.

Resource Governance Index[edit]

The Resource Governance Index, developed by NRGI, measures the quality of countries' resource governance and ranks them accordingly. The index is constructed by sending a 149-item questionnaire to 150 experts in 81 countries, who research the issues raised in the questionnaire, compile documentation and complete the questionnaire. The quality of the survey data is then assessed by NRGI and enriched by further data on countries "enabling environments".[14] Finally, NRGI calculates the index as a composite score out of the:

  • Value realization score;
  • Revenue management score;
  • Enabling environment score;

with higher scores indicating a better resource governance process.

Country/territory Assessed sector RGI 2017 score RGI 2017 rank Value realization score Revenue management score Enabling environment score
 Afghanistan Mining 34 71 58 31 14
 Algeria Oil & gas 33 73 40 25 35
 Angola Oil & gas 35 70 50 31 25
 Argentina Oil & gas 57 22 58 54 58
 Australia Mining 71 8 65 51 96
 Azerbaijan Oil & gas 47 47 49 43 49
 Bahrain Oil & gas 39 59 27 26 63
 Bangladesh Oil & gas 36 67 39 35 34
 Bolivia Oil & gas 54 34 61 51 49
 Botswana Mining 61 18 40 62 81
 Brazil Oil & gas 71 6 62 78 72
 Burkina Faso Mining 59 20 66 54 57
 Cambodia Mining 30 79 31 18 40
 Cameroon Oil & gas 54 30 59 70 33
 Canada Oil & gas 75 4 69 59 97
 Chad Oil & gas 34 72 39 43 19
 Chile Mining 81 2 74 81 90
 China Oil & gas 55 29 52 54 59
 Colombia Oil & gas 71 7 59 85 67
 Colombia Mining 69 10 59 82 67
 Democratic Republic of the Congo Mining 33 75 52 35 12
 Democratic Republic of the Congo Oil & gas 25 84 44 20 12
 Congo Oil & gas 39 58 45 44 29
 Ivory Coast Oil & gas 55 28 60 60 46
 Cuba Oil & gas 36 66 29 23 57
 Ecuador Oil & gas 54 32 51 58 52
 Egypt Oil & gas 39 60 45 30 41
 Equatorial Guinea Oil & gas 22 85 29 18 17
 Eritrea Mining 10 89 15 5 10
 Ethiopia Mining 40 57 46 38 37
 Gabon Oil & gas 36 65 18 47 44
 Ghana Mining 56 24 61 37 70
 Ghana Oil & gas 67 13 65 65 70
 Guatemala Mining 41 56 42 35 46
 Guinea Mining 38 63 53 24 37
 India Oil & gas 70 9 75 66 69
 Indonesia Mining 68 11 64 76 65
 Indonesia Oil & gas 68 12 64 76 65
 Iran Oil & gas 38 62 36 45 34
 Iraq Oil & gas 37 61 52 47 16
 Kazakhstan Oil & gas 56 25 53 54 61
 Kuwait Oil & gas 54 33 44 51 67
 Kyrgyzstan Mining 51 38 57 51 44
 Laos Mining 38 64 42 30 41
 Liberia Mining 44 52 59 30 41
 Libya Oil & gas 18 87 27 20 6
 Madagascar Mining 36 68 36 34 38
 Malaysia Oil & gas 56 27 49 41 77
 Mali Mining 53 35 48 70 42
 Mauritania Mining 29 82 41 10 36
 Mexico Oil & gas 61 17 64 54 65
 Mexico Mining 60 19 62 53 65
 Mongolia Mining 64 15 63 54 73
 Morocco Mining 52 37 56 35 64
 Mozambique Oil & gas 50 41 66 42 43
 Myanmar Oil & gas 31 77 44 30 19
 Myanmar Mining 27 83 33 30 19
 Niger Mining 54 31 55 60 47
 Nigeria Oil & gas 42 55 50 44 31
 Norway Oil & gas 86 1 77 84 97
 Oman Oil & gas 50 39 32 43 76
 Papua New Guinea Mining 47 46 50 50 40
 Peru Mining 62 16 68 57 62
 Philippines Mining 58 21 55 52 67
 Qatar Oil & gas 43 53 33 19 77
 Russia Oil & gas 45 50 47 40 47
 Saudi Arabia Oil & gas 36 69 23 24 60
 Sierra Leone Mining 46 49 62 35 40
 South Africa Mining 57 23 50 40 80
 South Sudan Oil & gas 32 76 42 47 5
 Sudan Oil & gas 21 86 26 26 11
 Tanzania Mining 49 42 54 40 53
 Tanzania Oil & gas 53 36 65 40 53
 East Timor Oil & gas 49 43 49 57 42
 Trinidad and Tobago Oil 64 14 64 57 71
 Tunisia Oil & gas 56 26 60 40 67
 Tunisia Mining 46 48 40 30 67
 Turkmenistan Oil & gas 11 88 11 0 21
 Uganda Oil & gas 44 51 42 42 47
 Ukraine Oil & gas 49 44 61 40 45
 United Arab Emirates Oil & gas 42 54 32 16 78
 United Kingdom Oil & gas 77 3 70 68 95
 United States Oil & gas 74 5 66 63 93
 Uzbekistan Oil & gas 29 80 40 25 22
 Venezuela Oil & gas 33 74 48 34 17
 Vietnam Oil & gas 48 45 57 30 59
 Yemen Oil & gas 30 78 50 28 11
 Zambia Mining 50 40 58 35 59
 Zimbabwe Mining 29 81 37 30 20

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Website of the Natural Resource Governance Institute