Navy Command (Royal Navy)

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Navy Command
Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg
Active 2010 - present
Country  United Kingdom
Allegiance Queen Elizabeth II
Branch Royal Navy
Type Navy Command
Part of Ministry of Defence, Naval Service
Garrison/HQ HQ HMS Excellent, Whale Island, Hampshire
50°48′53.7″N 1°5′59.1″W / 50.814917°N 1.099750°W / 50.814917; -1.099750
Commanders
Current
commander
Admiral Sir Philip Jones
Ceremonial chief Queen Elizabeth II

Navy Command Headquarters is the current headquarters body of the British Royal Navy, and it's primary financial accounting grouping. It is a hybrid, neither a command, nor simply an installation. Royal Navy official writings describe Navy Command Headquarters both as a physical site, on Whale Island, a collective formed of the most senior RN officers,[1] and as a budgetary grouping.

On 1 April 2006 the Fleet Top Level Budget was established. A Top Level Budget (TLB) is the major financial accounting group of the MOD. On 1 April 2010 the Fleet TLB was renamed Navy Command following the merger of the Commander-in-Chief Fleet and the Chief-of-Naval Personnel/ Commander-in-Chief Naval Home Command.[2] Thus Navy Command is the Top Level Budget (holder) for the RN.[3] Navy Command supports the First Sea Lord in the management of the Command, and delivers the Service’s current and future outputs as articulated in the Command Plan.[4]

Contents

History[edit]

Prior to 1964 responsibility for control and direction of the British Naval Affairs lay with Admiralty, naval command lay with the Admiralty Naval Staff. Following the merger of the Admiralty in 1964 into the new Ministry of Defence it became known as the Navy Department.[5][6] The Royal Navy was historically divided into a number of fleets and ashore commands, prominent examples being the Home Fleet and Portsmouth Command. By the 1960s a system was introduced to change the previous, globally dispersed assets, the fleet system was replaced at first by a Western Fleet and Eastern Fleet. However these were also eventually abolished and their units amalgamated into CINCFLEET.[7] At the same time, the commands established to manage individuals naval bases were replaced in 1969 after the post of Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth was merged with that of Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth to form Naval Home Command. As overseas bases continued to be reduced, the Navy's shore establishments became more concentrated in the UK, under Naval Home Command.

Navy Command Headquarters[edit]

The Navy Command Headquarters is based at Whale Island, Portsmouth, it also includes the Command Centre in Northwood, and also has support staff in Portsmouth Naval Base.[8]

The purpose-built Headquarters at Whale Island was opened in 2002 was named after Admiral of the Fleet Sir Henry Leach, the First Sea Lord during the Falklands War. The purpose of the NCHQ, as the higher echelon of Navy Command, is the carry out three main tasks: Force Generation, Planning for the future and Advice, Assurance and Accountability.[9]

Structure of the Navy Command[edit]

Navy Command, Royal Navy, Hierarchy Chart, 31 March 2016
Navy Command, Senior Naval Staff, Hierarchy Chart, 31 March 2016
Office of the Second Sea Lord and Deputy Chief of Naval Staff, Royal Navy, Hierarchy Chart, 31 March 2016
Office of the Fleet Commander, Hierarchy Chart, 31 March 2016

The First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, is the Royal Navy's professional head and Chairman of the Navy Board. He is responsible to the Secretary of State for the fighting effectiveness, efficiency and morale of the Naval Service, and supports the Secretary of State for Defence in the management and direction of the Armed Forces.

The Fleet Commander exercises Full Command on behalf of 1SL over all Fleet Units, Battlestaffs, the Fleet Air Arm, Royal Fleet Auxiliary and the Royal Marines. He is responsible for the Generation of units for tasking and the Operation of the Fleet in meeting standing commitments, conduct of current operations and maintaining their contingent capability as directed by Head Office and articulated in the Navy Command Plan.[10]

The Second Sea Lord (2SL) leads Navy Command HQ and is responsible for the Development and Delivery of future and current capability in support of the Fleet Commander and as detailed in the Navy Command Plan.[11]

Office of the First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff[edit]

As of 6 April 2017:[12][13]

Senior Naval Staff[edit]

Includes:[14][15]

Office of the Second Sea Lord and Deputy Chief of Naval Staff[edit]

As of 31 March 2016:[14][15]

Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Aviation & Carriers)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff, Aviation and Carriers, (ACNS A&C) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Carrier Strike and Aviation, (ACOS CSV) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Land and Littoral Manoeuvre and Deputy Commandant General Royal Marines, (ACOS LLM) [16]
    • Commanding Officer Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton, (CO LV) [16]
Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Capability)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Capability), (ACNS Cap) [16] - also Controller of the Navy and Chief of Staff, Navy Command Headquarters.
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Warfare, (COS W) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Information Warfare, (COS IW) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Maritime Capability, (COS Mar Cap) [16]
Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Personnel)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Personnel), (ACNS Pers) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Medical, (COS Med) [16] - also Surgeon Commodore (Surg Cdre)
    • Commodore Naval Legal Services, (CNLS) [16]
    • Commodore Naval Personnel Strategy, (CNPS) [16]
    • Commodore Naval Personnel, (CNP) [16]
    • Commander Maritime Reserves, (COMMARRES) [16]
Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Ships)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Ships), (ACNS Ships) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Ships, (ACOS Ships) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Afloat Support, (ACOS Ships) [16]
Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Submarines)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Submarines), (ACNS Sub) [16] - also (FO S&NI)
Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Support)[edit]
Office of the Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland[edit]

The Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland, (FO S&NI) [16] - also (ACNS Submarines) is the senior Royal Navy Representative within Scotland and Northern Ireland liaising with the Scottish government and NI Assembly on Naval issues.

Office of the Chaplain of the Fleet[edit]
  • The Chaplain of the Fleet, (Chp FLT).[16]
  • Deputy Chaplain of the Fleet.[16]
    • Royal Navy Chaplaincy Service,
Office of the Naval Secretary[edit]
  • Naval Secretary, (NAV SEC) [16] - also (ACNS Pers & FO Res)
    • Naval Assistant to Naval Secretary, (NA SEC) [16]
Flag Officer, Maritime Reserves[edit]
  • Commander Maritime Reserves (COMMARRES) [16] - also (ACNS Pers & NAV SEC)
Office of the Fleet Commander[edit]

As of 31 March 2016:[14][18][15]

Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Training)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Training) (ACNS, FO ST) [16]
    • Assistant Chief of Staff Training, (ACOS T), /Deputy Flag Officer, Sea Training [16]
    • Commanding Officer Maritime Warfare School and Commanding Officer Operational Training, (COM OT) [16]
    • Commander Core Naval Training, (COM CORE) [16]
Office of the Commander Operations[edit]
Office of the Commander UK Maritime Forces[edit]
Office of the Commander UK Amphibious Forces/Commandant General Royal Marines[edit]
Office of the Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff (Policy)[edit]

As of 31 March 2016:[14]

  • Assistant Chief of the Naval Staff, (Policy), (ACNS Pol) [16] directs and develops naval strategic policy and strategy for the Royal Navy.
Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff (Policy)[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of Staff (Policy), (ACOS Policy) [16] (ACNS Pol) manages the department and staff of (ACNS Pol).
Office of the Commodore, Naval Staff[edit]
Office of the Commodore, Regional Forces[edit]
  • Commodore, Regional Forces, (Cdre REGFOR) & Naval Regional [16] superintends the 4 UK geographical naval regional commands.
    • Naval Regional Commander Eastern England, (NRC EE) - also (Cdre REGFOR) [16]
    • Naval Regional Commander, Northern England (NRC NE) [16]
    • Naval Regional Commander, Wales & Western England (NRC WWE) [16]
Office of the Head of Royal Navy Communications[edit]
  • Head of Royal Navy Communications, (COMMS Hd) [16] Principal Navy Command advisor on RN communications and communications strategy.
Office of the Finance Director Navy[edit]

As of 31 March 2016:[14]

  • Finance Director (Navy) [16] is the Chief Financial Officer of Navy Command's delegated budget and superintends the Command Secretariat.
Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff Resources and Plans[edit]
  • Assistant Chief of Staff Resources and Plans [16] supports the Director of Navy Finance in delivering the Naval financial objectives and adhering to the framework of legal, political, financial and regulatory authorities.
Office of the Command Secretary[edit]
  • Command Secretary [16] is the senior civilian in Navy Command Headquarters responsible for civilian personnel, external accountability, resource management and certain aspects of planning.
Office of the Deputy Finance Director, Navy[edit]
  • Deputy Finance Director [16] is responsible overall financially managing Navy Command and the Head of the Navy Command Finance department.
Office of the Head of Navy Effectiveness and Strategy[edit]
  • Head of Navy Effectiveness and Strategy [16] superintends multidisciplinary project teams, specializing in policy, commercial and financial expertise he reports back to both the (FD(N) and ACNS(Pol).

Navy Command supporting organisations[edit]

Command Centre Northwood[edit]

Northwood is the UK’s principal military headquarters site is home to 5 operational HQs. The Joint Forces Command HQ, including Permanent Joint Headquarters and the Joint Forces Headquarters, the Commander Operations for the Royal Navy.[20]

Defence Equipment and Support[edit]

Formed in April 2007 from the amalgamation of both the Defence Logistics Organisation (DLO) and the Defence Procurement Agency (DPA) to form Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S). It provides naval equipment and also responsible for sustaining the Fleet and ensuring that the required vessels and units are available for operations according to the command plan. Superintended by the Chief of Staff, who administers the Maritime Warfare Centre, communications systems, engineering and certain functions of Fleet Air Arm support.[21] [22][21]

Flag Officer Sea Training[edit]

Is the organisation responsible for training of all Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels.[23]

Fleet Battle Staff[edit]

Based in two locations (Portsmouth and Plymouth) the Fleet Battle Staff is the operational planning department, that plans exercises and operations for large multinational naval and marine task groups across the globe. The actual conduct of naval operations is generally the responsibility of the Joint Forces Command.[24]

Maritime Warfare Centre[edit]

The Maritime Warfare Centre is an Operational Knowledge-Centered Support service allows the Royal Navy the ability to observe and process all aspects of operational experience to learn lessons from previous operations and enhance fighting power.[25]

Royal Naval Chaplaincy Service[edit]

The Royal Naval Chaplaincy Service is responsible to the First Sea Lord for provision of pastoral support, ensuring the spiritual and pastoral needs of all Service personnel the service is superintended by the Chaplain of the Fleet.[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Navy Command senior, as of April 2017 - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Ministry of Defence UK. 30 April 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Unit:Navy Command
  2. ^ "CIVILIAN WORKFORCE BY GRADE EQUIVALENCE AND BUDGETARY AR" (PDF). assets.publishing.service.gov.uk. London England: Ministry of Defence, Defence Analytical Services & Advice. p. 5. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  3. ^ Hayman, Charles (2014). The Armed Forces of the United Kingdom 2014-2015. Barnsley, England: Pen and Sword. p. 14. ISBN 9781783463510.
  4. ^ Ministry of Defence UK (26 April 2018). "SECTION 2 – DEFENCE OPERATING MODEL CONTEXT" (PDF). data.parliament.uk. Parliament, United Kingdom. p. 1. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  5. ^ Stationary Office, H.M. (31 October 1967). The Navy List. Spink and Sons Ltd, London, England. pp. 524–532.
  6. ^ Lagassé, ed. by Paul (2000). "Admiralty". The Columbia encyclopedia (6. ed.). [New York]: Columbia Univ. Press u.a. ISBN 978-0787650155.
  7. ^ "Royal Navy - Fleet Command and Organisation - Naval Home Command - Defence Equipment and Support - n2a2 - Armed Forces". armedforces.co.uk. R & F Defence Publications, 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  8. ^ "Navy Command HQ, Royal Navy". royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy, MOD, UK. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-26. Retrieved 2013-12-25. Navy Matters - Headquarters organisation
  10. ^ Parliament United Kingdom (26 April 2018). "Defence Operating Model" (PDF). data.parliament.uk. London UK: Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  11. ^ Parliament United Kingdom (26 April 2018). "Defence Operating Model" (PDF). data.parliament.uk. London UK: Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Ministry of Defence, Organogram". data.gov.uk. Ministry of Defence, 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  13. ^ "MOD roles and salaries: Navy Command Senior, as of April 2017". www.gov.uk. Ministry of Defence, April 2016. Retrieved 9 August 2017.
  14. ^ a b c d e MOD, Organogram, 31 March 2016
  15. ^ a b c MOD, Navy Command Senior, as of April 2016
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg Government, H.M. "The Navy List" (PDF). royalnavy.mod.uk. H.M. Stationary Office, January, 2017, pp.6-9. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  17. ^ "Defence Equipment & Support organisation chart: May 2017 (updated 18 May 2018)" (PDF). Defence Equipment and Support. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  18. ^ "Royal Marines". royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy, MOD, 2017. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  19. ^ Speller, Ian (2004). The Royal Navy and Maritime Power in the Twentieth Century. Routledge. p. 126. ISBN 9781134269822.
  20. ^ Government, H.M. "Northwood Headquarters - GOV.UK". gov.uk. MOD. UK. 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  21. ^ a b Government, H.M. "Defence Equipment and Support - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. MOD, 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  22. ^ DE&S Organisation Chart retrieved August 2017
  23. ^ "FOST, Royal Navy". royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy, MOD, 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  24. ^ Government, H.M. "Fleet Battle Staff". webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 17 April 2009. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  25. ^ "Supporting the Maritime Warfare Centre". BAE Systems International. BAE Systems, 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  26. ^ Government, H.M. "Chaplains, Royal Navy". www.royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy, MOD, 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017.

Sources[edit]

  • Government, H.M. "The Navy List" (PDF). royalnavy.mod.uk. H.M. Stationery Office, January, 2017.
  • "Ministry of Defence, Organogram". data.gov.uk. Ministry of Defence, 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  • "MOD roles and salaries: Navy Command Senior, as of April 2016". www.gov.uk. Ministry of Defence, April 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  • "Navy Command HQ, Royal Navy". royalnavy.mod.uk. Royal Navy, MOD, UK. Retrieved 7 August 2017.
  • Speller, Ian (2004). The Royal Navy and Maritime Power in the Twentieth Century. Routledge. ISBN 9781134269822.
  • Stationery Office, H.M. (1967). The Navy List. Spink and Sons Ltd, London, England.

Further reading[edit]

  • Grove. D. Philip and Redford. Duncan. (2014). "The Royal Navy: A History Since 1900". I.B.Tauris. IBAN: 9780857735072.

External links[edit]