Nazis in fiction

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During and after the Second World War, Nazism became a key driving force behind Allied propaganda, as well as the development of the superhero during the Golden Age of comics. Ideas that the Third Reich could have possibly implemented have helped to fuel various films, books and comics from 1939 to the present day. In almost all fictional use of Nazis, both during and after the war years, the Nazis are portrayed as cold-hearted, ruthless and evil. They are often stereotypically portrayed as wearing monocles and black uniforms.[1]

Films and cartoons[edit]

Education for Death. The film is in the public domain in the United States.

Various propaganda films used the Nazis as a way to encourage patriotism and national pride, as well as a means to recruit soldiers into the Allied forces.

The British cinema were the main people to create such films before the American entry into the war following Pearl Harbor. The British comedian Will Hay created various films that ranged from Nazi spies being smuggled into mainland Britain via the Isle of Skye, to scientists working on gas-bombs.

American cinema at first used the Nazis only to show the stubbornness of the Reich, such as the 1940s film, Casablanca. American propaganda concentrated largely on the Japanese involvement in the war, with the Nazis as a backup.

The Looney Tunes and Walt Disney Studios used the Nazis as a ploy for their comic characters. However, Disney seemed to concentrate more on the German people within the Nazi Regime, as shown in their 1943 film, Der Fuehrers' Face, starring Donald Duck. Warner Brothers produced a series of propaganda cartoons named Private Snafu to train recruits on what not to do if they were in a situation similar to those in the cartoons.

Comics[edit]

The comic-book industry were able to boost their sales because of their help in the war effort meant that they were spared from paper recycling. Superheroes in particular, like Captain America were pictured as fighting the Nazis, both real and fictitious, in large battles. The better remembered version is of Captain America fighting Adolf Hitler himself. In Fawcett Comics the character Captain Marvel fought against the Monster Society of Evil, which included Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Hideki Tojo, along with Captain Nazi and Herr Phoul, a stereotypical Nazi officer. Captain Nazi was a superstrong perfect Nazi who was a major enemy of Captain Marvel Jr.. Hitler was shown in the hellish realm of the demon Mephisto in a Thor comic, and in a story where the demon Sattanish resurrects and empowers four historical murderors to form a Lethal Legion, one of them is Heinrich Himmler, who is given the power to belch gas fumes from his mouth.

The British comics tended to portray the Nazis as clumsy and foolish due the cartoon-style of the comics available at that time, as shown in characters like Desperate Dan and Lord Snooty.

The retro-comic-book company, Big Bang Comics, have recreated a lot of Golden Age comics using Nazi characters for villains, ranging from Nazi spies to saboteurs. The All-Star Squadron of DC Comics was another retro-comic produced in the style of World War II propaganda comics. A tactic also used in the Amalgam Comics run with Super Soldier.

By the beginning of the Silver Age of Comics in the 1960s, the focus of the Nazi threat turned to the threat of Communism with the rise of the Cold War. In the Flashpoint event Nazis are occupying Brazil.

Books[edit]

Various books written during wartime were few and far-between, partially from National Service that called up a large amount of volunteers, and the other from paper rationing. Ka-Tzetnik 135633 published accounts of his experiences at the Auschwitz concentration camp. He anonymously published his erotic The House of Dolls in 1955. The stalag fiction uses sexploitation to describe the German camp brothels in World War II. Ka-Tzetnik 135633 described how the Nazis forced women were forced into sex slavery at the Freudenabteilung (Joy Division). The author revealed his identity in 1961 at the trial of Adolf Eichmann. Outside of comics, only a few books were ever written for propaganda purposes. Those that were tended to work along the lines of the comic books.[2]

Magazines[edit]

After the rise of the books, many men's magazines followed up with the same content. Real Men published a Nazi-themed cover and story in 1959.[3] Real Men followed up in 1960 with a similar cover with the featured story, "Inside the Nazi Death Chambers."[4] "The Underground Army of Red Recruiters... The Call Girl Traitors of Berlin" was the next story to appear in the magazine in 1961. [5] Another similar cover appeared in the same year[6], again in 1964[7], and again in 1965.[8] In 1966, the magazine published the article, "How We Broke Up the Fantastic Plot to Smuggle Hitler in Argentina."[9] Real Men published "Charlie Ruff--the Montana Hunter Who Destroyed the Nazi Fortress in Argentina" in 1967.[10]


Man's Epic featured a similar style with their first issue in September of 1963.[11] The magazine published a similar cover in April, 1964.[12] In June, 1964, they published "Captive Beauties for the Monster Baron."[13] "Love Slaves of France's Harlot Army" is an article that appeared in Man's Epic in August, 1964.[14] The magazine published the article, "Secret Horrors of the Nazi Torture Cult" in October, 1964.[15] Men's Epic featured a similar article in December, 1964.[16] In February, 1965, they published an article, "Tortured Beauties for the Nazi Blood Cult."[17] Man's Epic publishes the article, "Soft Bodies for Hitler's Torture Master," in April, 1965,[18] and continued the story for June, 1965.[19] "Nude Beauties for the Devil's Chains" appeared in the issue for August, 1965.[20] Man's Epic features "Chained Nudes for the Monster's Rack" in October, 1965.[21] They followed with "Trapped in the Fires of Lust" in February of 1966.[22] Man's Epic publishes a similar cover in April, 1966.[23] In May, 1966, they published "Shackled Nudes of the Monster General."[24] Man's Epic publishes "Scream for my Kisses Before You Die" in July, 1966.[25] They published "Soft Decoys of Death to Smash the Krauts" in September, 1966.[26] Man's Epic publishes "The Gestapo's Sin Queen in the Boudoir of Hate" in November, 1966.[27] In January, 1967, they published "Doomed Harlots in Hitler's House of Horror."[28] Man's Epic published "The Fantastic Lust of the Nazi Sin Spy" in March of 1967.[29] In July, 1967, they magazine published "Sin Swindle of the Nazi-Killing Wantons."[30] In May, 1968, Man's Epic published "Exposé: Odessa--the Nazis' Worldwide Underground Organization."[31] They published "Hot Lead for the Nazis' Maiden-Butchering Monster" in March, 1969.[32] In July, 1969, Man's Epic published "Mission Impossible: Smash the Nazis' Female Torture Stalag.[33] In September, 1969, they published "Tonight We Hit the Krauts' Hell Plant."[34] In January, 1970, Man's Epic published "Operation Blood: Get Hitler's Maiden Butchering Sadist."[35] Man's Epic published "Amerikaner, Watch Your Maquis Maiden Die Horribly!" in March, 1970.[36] In April, 1971, they magazine published "The Terror-Bound Virgins in Hitler's Brothel of Agony."[37] In August, 1971, Man's Epic published "Soft Flesh for the Nazi Monster's Pit in Hell."[38] They published "Helpless Beauties of the Nazis' Circus of Agony in October, 1971.[39] Man's Epic published "Inside the Nazis' Hell Prison for Girls" in February of 1972.[40] "Bring Out the Hostages of Hitler's Death Trap" was published in Man's Epic in April of 1972.[41] In August, 1972, Man's Epic featured an apparent Neo-Nazi.[42] They published in October, 1972, the article, "Chains of Agony for the Bound Beauties of Norway."[43] Man's Epic published "Lt. Maynard's Incredible Kraut-Killing Beauties" in December of 1972.[44]

Videogames[edit]

Wolfenstein 3D, 1992

"Wolfenstein" emerged in 1981 and focuses on the escape of a POW in a Nazi POW camp. Wolfenstein 3D was released in 1992 for MS-DOS and arguably popularized the franchise, as well as the first-person shooter video game. The game is from the perspective of an American POW, William "B.J." Blazkowicz in WWII as he escapes several floors through opening various doors to find food and ammunition, but also to come across Aryan Nazi guards and violent German Shepherds. The game was considered a financial success, gathered awards, and is remembered as the first shooter game with rudimentary visual effects.[45]

List of fictitious Nazis[edit]

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Image: 1265_Hans_von_Seeckt.jpeg, (349 × 480 px)". preussen-chronik.de. Retrieved 2017-July-17.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  2. ^ Mikics, David; (August, 2012). "Holocaust Pulp Fiction". Tablet Magazine. http://tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/books/97160/ka-tzetnik
  3. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1959. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image12.php
  4. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1960. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image15.php
  5. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1961. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image17.php
  6. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1961. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image18.php
  7. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1964. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image21.php
  8. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1965. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image22.php
  9. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1966. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image26.php
  10. ^ Real Men. Stag Mags. 1967. Accessed 18 July. 2017. http://m.stagmags.com/R-to-S/Real-Men/imagepages/image27.php
  11. ^ Man's Epic. September. 1963. Accessed 18 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196309.jpg
  12. ^ Man's Epic. April. 1964. Accessed 18 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196404.jpg
  13. ^ "Captive Beauties for the Monster Baron." Man's Epic. June. 1964. Accessed 18 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196406.jpg
  14. ^ "Love Slaves of France's Harlot Army." Man's Epic. June. 1964. Accessed 18 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196408.jpg
  15. ^ "Secret Horrors of the Nazi Torture Cult." Man's Epic. October. 1964. Accessed 18 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196410.jpg
  16. ^ Man's Epic. December. 1964. Accessed 18 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196412.jpg
  17. ^ " Tortured Beauties for the Nazi Blood Cult." Man's Epic. February. 1965. Accessed 18 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196502.jpg
  18. ^ "Soft Bodies for Hitler's Torture Master." Man's Epic. April. 1965. Accessed 17 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196504.jpg
  19. ^ "Soft Bodies for Hitler's Torture Master." Man's Epic. June. 1965. Accessed 17 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196506.jpg
  20. ^ "Nude Beauties for the Devil's Chains." Man's Epic. August. 1965. Accessed 17 July 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196508.jpg
  21. ^ "Chained Nudes for the Monster's Rack." Man's Epic. October. 1965. Accessed in 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196510.jpg
  22. ^ "Trapped in the Fires of Lust." Man's Epic. February. 1966. Accessed 19 July, 2017.http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196602.jpg
  23. ^ Man's Epic. April. 1966. Accessed 19 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196604.jpg
  24. ^ "Shackled Nudes of the Monster General." Man's Epic. May. 1966. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196605.jpg
  25. ^ "Scream for my Kisses Before You Die." July. 1966. Accessed 19 July. 2017.http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196607.jpg
  26. ^ "Soft Decoys of Death to Smash the Krauts." Man's Epic. September. 1966. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196609.jpg
  27. ^ "The Gestapo's Sin Queen in the Boudoir of Hate." Man's Epic. November. 1966. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196611.jpg
  28. ^ "Doomed Harlots in Hitler's House of Horror." Man's Epic. January. 1967. Accessed on 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196701.jpg
  29. ^ "The Fantastic Lust of the Nazi Sin Spy." Man's Epic. March. 1967. Accessed on 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196703.jpg
  30. ^ "Sin Swindle of the Nazi-Killing Wantons." Man's Epic. July. 1967. Accessed 19 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196707.jpg
  31. ^ "Exposé: Odessa--the Nazis' Worldwide Underground Organization." Man's Epic. May. 1968. Accessed 17 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196805.jpg
  32. ^ "Hot Lead for the Nazis' Maiden-Butchering Monster." Man's Epic. March. 1969. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196903.jpg
  33. ^ "Mission Impossible: Smash the Nazis' Female Torture Stalag." Man's Epic. July. 1969. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196907.jpg
  34. ^ "Tonight We Hit the Krauts' Hell Plant." Man's Epic. September. 1969. Accessed 17 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_196909.jpg
  35. ^ "Operation Blood: Get Hitler's Maiden Butchering Sadist. Man's Epic. January. 1970. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197001.jpg
  36. ^ "Amerikaner, Watch Your Maquis Maiden Die Horribly!" Man's Epic. March. 1970. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197003.jpg
  37. ^ "The Terror-Bound Virgins in Hitler's Brothel of Agony." Man's Epic. July. 1971. Accessed 17 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197104.jpg
  38. ^ "Soft Flesh for the Nazi Monster's Pit in Hell." Man's Epic. August. 1971. Accessed 19 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197108.jpg
  39. ^ "Helpless Beauties of the Nazis' Circus of Agony." Man's Epic. October. 1971. Accessed 19 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197110.jpg
  40. ^ "Inside the Nazis' Hell Prison for Girls." Man's Epic. February. 1972. Accessed 17 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197202.jpg
  41. ^ "Bring Out the Hostages of Hitler's Death Trap." Man's Epic. April. 1972. Accessed 19 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197204.jpg
  42. ^ Man's Epic. August. 1972. Accessed 17 July. 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197208.jpg
  43. ^ "Chains of Agony for the Bound Beauties of Norway." Man's Epic. October. 1972. Accessed 19 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197210.jpg
  44. ^ "Lt. Maynard's Incredible Kraut-Killing Beauties." Man's Epic. December. 1972. Accessed 19 July, 2017. http://www.philsp.com/data/images/m/mans_epic_197212.jpg
  45. ^ "Awards - Thy Name Is Controversy". Computer Gaming World. No. 106. May 1993. p. 146. Accessed 2017-07-18. http://www.cgwmuseum.org/galleries/index.php?year=1993&pub=2&id=106