List of nearest stars and brown dwarfs

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Rotating 3D image of the nearest stars
Animated 3D map of the nearest stars, centered on the Sun. 3d glasses red green.svg 3D red green glasses are recommended to view this image correctly.
Distance and angle conformal map of the celestial neighbourhood within 12 light years of Sol.

This list covers all known stars, brown dwarfs, and sub-brown dwarfs within 5.0 parsecs (16.3 light-years) of the Solar System. So far, 76 such stars/dwarfs have been found, of which only nine are bright enough to be visible without a telescope. The visible light needs to reach or exceed the dimmest brightness to be visible to the naked eye from Earth, 6.5 apparent magnitude.[1]

Our Solar System, and the other stars/dwarfs listed here, are currently moving within (or near) the Local Interstellar Cloud, roughly 30 light-years (9.2 pc) across. The Local Interstellar Cloud is, in turn, contained inside the Local Bubble, which is a volume of space 300+ light years across. It contains Ursa Major and the Hyades star cluster, among others. The Local Bubble also contains the neighboring G-Cloud, which contains the stars Alpha Centauri and Altair. In the galactic context, the Local Bubble is a small part of the Orion Arm, which contains most stars that we can see without a telescope. The Orion arm is one of the spiral swirls of our Milky Way galaxy.

The currently known 76 objects are bound in 54 stellar systems. The closest system is Alpha Centauri, with Proxima Centauri as the closest star in that system, at 4.25 light-years from Earth. The brightest among these systems, as well as the brightest in Earth's night sky, is Sirius. Of the population of currently known stars/dwarfs, 62 are main sequence stars, with 51 of those being red dwarfs and the remaining 11 having greater mass, enough to be 'typical' stars. Additionally, astronomers have found four white dwarfs (a star that has exhausted all fusible hydrogen), as well as 9 brown dwarfs, and the closest and only sub-brown dwarf WISE 0855−0714 (basically, a cold rogue planet). By far the largest, most massive, most luminous and hottest main-sequence star within the 5 parsecs is Sirius, which also has a white dwarf companion that used to be much more massive.

Based on results from the Gaia telescope's second data release from April 2018, an estimated 694 stars will possibly approach the Solar System to less than 5 parsecs in the next 15 million years. Of these, 26 have a good probability to come within 1.0 parsec (3.3 light-years) and another 7 within 0.5 parsecs (1.6 light-years).[2] This number is likely much higher, due to the sheer number of stars needed to be surveyed; a star approaching the Solar System 10 million years ago, moving at a typical Sun-relative 20–200 kilometers per second, would be 600–6,000 light-years from the Sun at present day, with millions of stars closer to the Sun. The closest encounter to the Sun so far predicted is the low-mass orange dwarf star Gliese 710 / HIP 89825 with roughly 60% the mass of the Sun.[3] It is currently predicted to pass 19,300 ± 3,200 astronomical units (0.305 ± 0.051 light-years) from the Sun in 1.280+0.041
−0.039
million years from the present, close enough to significantly disturb the Solar System's Oort cloud.[2][3]

The easiest way to determine stellar distance to the Sun for objects at these distances is parallax, which measures how much stars appear to move against background objects over the course of Earth's orbit around the Sun. As a parsec (parallax-second) is defined by the distance of an object that would appear to move exactly one second of arc against background objects, stars less than 5 parsecs away will have measured parallaxes of over 0.2 arcseconds, or 200 milliarcseconds. Determining past and future positions relies on accurate astrometric measurements of their parallax and total proper motions (how far they move across the sky due to their actual velocity relative to the Sun), along with spectroscopically determined radial velocities (their speed directly towards or away from us, which combined with proper motion defines their true movement through the sky relative to the Sun). Both of these measurements are subject to increasing and significant errors over very long time spans, especially over the several thousand-year time spans it takes for stars to noticeably move relative to each other.[4]

List[edit]

Key
# Visible to the unaided eye
$ Bright star (absolute magnitude of +8.5 or brighter)
white dwarf White dwarf
§ Brown dwarf or sub-brown dwarf
* Nearest in constellation

The classes of the stars and brown dwarfs are shown in the color of their spectral types (these colors are derived from conventional names for the spectral types and do not represent the star's observed color). Many brown dwarfs are not listed by visual magnitude but are listed by near-infrared J band apparent magnitude due to how dim (and often invisible) they are in visible color bands (U, B or V). Absolute magnitude (with electromagnetic wave, 'light' band denoted in subscript) is a measurement at a 10-parsec distance across imaginary empty space devoid of all its sparse dust and gas. Some of the parallaxes and resultant distances are rough measurements.[5]

Known star systems within 5.0 parsecs (16.3 light-years)
Designation Distance[6]
(light-years (±err))
Constellation Coordinates:
RADec
(Ep J2000, Eq J2000)[5]
Stellar
class
Mass Magnitude (mV[5] or mJ) Parallax
(mas (±err))

[5][note 1]
Notes and additional
references
System Star or (sub-) brown dwarf M Apparent Absolute
Solar System Sun (Sol)$ 0.0000158 N/A N/A G2V[5] 1 −26.74# 4.85 N/A eight known planets
Alpha Centauri C (Proxima Centauri, V645 Centauri) 4.2465±0.0003 Centaurus* 14h 29m 43.0s
−62° 40′ 46″
M5.5Ve 0.122 11.09 15.53 768.0665±0.0499[7] flare star, three confirmed planets (b, 2016, c, 2019,[8] d, 2020).[9][10]
A (Rigil Kentaurus)$ 4.3441±0.0022 14h 39m 36.5s
−60° 50′ 02″
G2V[5] 1.079 0.01# 4.38 750.81±0.38[11] one directly-imaged habitable-zone planet candidate (Candidate 1) (2021)
B (Toliman)$ 14h 39m 35.1s
−60° 50′ 14″
K1V[5] 0.909 1.34# 5.71 one suspected planet (c) (2013)
(planet b refuted in 2015)
Barnard's Star (BD+04°3561a) 5.9629±0.0004 Ophiuchus* 17h 57m 48.5s
+04° 41′ 36″
M4.0Ve 0.144 9.53 13.22 546.9759±0.0401[7] flare star, largest-known proper motion,[12] one disputed planet (b)[13][14]
Luhman 16
(WISE 1049−5319)
6.5029±0.0011 Carina* 10h 49m 18.9s
−53° 19′ 10″
L8±1[15] 0.032 10.7 J 14.2 J 501.557±0.082[16] one refuted planet (Ab[17] in 2017[18])
T1±2[15] 0.027
WISE 0855−0714§ 7.430±0.041 Hydra* 08h 55m 10.8s
−07° 14′ 43″
Y4 0.003-0.010 25.0 J 439.0±2.4[19] sub-brown dwarf
Wolf 359 (CN Leonis) 7.8558±0.0013 Leo* 10h 56m 29.2s
+07° 00′ 53″
M6.0V[5] 0.090 13.44 16.55 415.1794±0.0684[7] flare star, has 2 known planets[13]
Lalande 21185 (BD+36°2147) 8.3044±0.0007 Ursa Major* 11h 03m 20.2s
+35° 58′ 12″
M2.0V[5] 0.390 7.47 10.44 392.7529±0.0321[7] two known planets (2019)(2021)[13]
Alpha Canis Majoris A (Sirius)$ 8.7094±0.0054 Canis Major* 06h 45m 08.9s
−16° 42′ 58″
A1V[5] 2.063 −1.46# 1.42 374.4896±0.2313[7] brightest star in the night sky
Bwhite dwarf DA2[5] 1.018 8.44 11.34
Luyten 726-8 A (BL Ceti) 8.724±0.012 Cetus* 01h 39m 01.3s
−17° 57′ 01″
M5.5Ve 0.102 12.54 15.40 373.8443±0.5009[7] flare star (Archetypal member)
B (UV Ceti) M6.0Ve 0.100 12.99 15.85
Ross 154 (V1216 Sagittarii) 9.7063±0.0009 Sagittarius* 18h 49m 49.4s
−23° 50′ 10″
M3.5Ve 0.17 10.43 13.07 336.0266±0.0317[7] flare star
Ross 248 (HH Andromedae) 10.3057±0.0014 Andromeda* 23h 41m 54.7s
+44° 10′ 30″
M5.5Ve 0.136 12.29 14.79 316.4812±0.0444[7] flare star
Epsilon Eridani (Ran)$ 10.4749±0.0037 Eridanus* 03h 32m 55.8s
−09° 27′ 30″
K2V[5] 0.820 3.73# 6.19 311.37±0.11[20] three circumstellar disks,
two suspected planets (AEgir (debated) and c) (2000 & 2002)[21]
Lacaille 9352 (Gliese 887) 10.7241±0.0007 Piscis Austrinus* 23h 05m 52.0s
−35° 51′ 11″
M0.5V 0.486 7.34 9.75 304.1354±0.0200[7] two planets, b and c, with equivocal evidence for a third in the habitable zone (2020)[22]
Ross 128 (FI Virginis) 11.0074±0.0011 Virgo* 11h 47m 44.4s
+00° 48′ 16″
M4.0Vn 0.168 11.13 13.51 296.3053±0.0302[7] flare star, one planet (b) (2017)[23]
EZ Aquarii
(Gliese 866, Luyten 789-6)
A 11.109±0.034 Aquarius* 22h 38m 33.4s
−15° 17′ 57″
M5.0Ve 0.11 13.33 15.64 293.60±0.9[24] A & B flare stars
B M? 0.11 13.27 15.58
C M? 0.10 14.03 16.34
Alpha Canis Minoris A (Procyon)$ 11.402±0.032 Canis Minor* 07h 39m 18.1s
+05° 13′ 30″
F5IV–V[5] 1.499 0.38# 2.66 286.05±0.81
[25][26]
Bwhite dwarf DQZ[5] 0.602 10.70 12.98
61 Cygni A (BD+38°4343)$ 11.4039±0.0012 Cygnus* 21h 06m 53.9s
+38° 44′ 58″
K5.0V[5] 0.70 5.21# 7.49 286.0054±0.0289[7] First star (besides Sun) to have measured distance.[27]
B flare star and brightest red dwarf in night sky, with possible planet or brown dwarf.[28]
Possible circumstellar disk.
B (BD+38°4344)$ 21h 06m 55.3s
+38° 44′ 31″
K7.0V[5] 0.63 6.03# 8.31
Struve 2398
(Gliese 725, BD+59°1915)
A (HD 173739) 11.4908±0.0009 Draco* 18h 42m 46.7s
+59° 37′ 49″
M3.0V[5] 0.334 8.90 11.16 283.8401±0.0220[7] flare stars, star B has 2 known planets[13]
B (HD 173740) 18h 42m 46.9s
+59° 37′ 37″
M3.5V[5] 0.248 9.69 11.95
Groombridge 34
(Gliese 15)
A (GX Andromedae) 11.6191±0.0008 Andromeda 00h 18m 22.9s
+44° 01′ 23″
M1.5V[5] 0.38 8.08 10.32 280.7068±0.0203[7] flare star, two suspected planets (Ac, 2017) and Ab, 2014)[29]
B (GQ Andromedae) M3.5V[5] 0.15 11.06 13.30 flare star
DX Cancri (G 51-15) 11.6797±0.0027 Cancer* 08h 29m 49.5s
+26° 46′ 37″
M6.5Ve 0.09 14.78 16.98 279.2496±0.0637[7] flare star
Epsilon Indi
(CPD−57°10015)
A$ 11.8670±0.0041 Indus* 22h 03m 21.7s
−56° 47′ 10″
K5Ve[5] 0.754 4.69# 6.89 274.8431±0.0956[7] one planet (Ab) (2018)[30]
Ba§ 22h 04m 10.5s
−56° 46′ 58″
T1.0V 0.065 12.3 J[31]
Bb§ T6.0V 0.050 13.2 J[31]
Tau Ceti (BD−16°295)$ 11.9118±0.0074 Cetus 01h 44m 04.1s
−15° 56′ 15″
G8.5Vp[5] 0.783 3.49# 5.68 273.8097±0.1701[7] one debris disk
four confirmed planets (e, f, g, and h) (2012, 2017),
four candidate planets (b, c, d, and "i") (2012, 2019), and 1 predicted planet (2020).
Gliese 1061 (LHS 1565) 11.9839±0.0014 Horologium* 03h 35m 59.7s
−44° 30′ 45″
M5.5V[5] 0.113 13.09 15.26 272.1615±0.0316[7] has 3 known planets (2019)[32][33][34]
YZ Ceti (LHS 138) 12.1222±0.0015 Cetus 01h 12m 30.6s
−16° 59′ 56″
M4.5V[5] 0.130 12.02 14.17 269.0573±0.0337[7] flare star, three planets (b, c, and d) (2017),[35]
one suspected planet (e)
Luyten's Star (BD+05°1668) 12.3485±0.0019 Canis Minor 07h 27m 24.5s
+05° 13′ 33″
M3.5Vn 0.26 9.86 11.97 264.1269±0.0413[7] two planets (b, c) (2017)[36] and two suspected planets (d, e) (2019)[37]
Teegarden's Star (SO025300.5+165258) 12.4970±0.0045 Aries* 02h 53m 00.9s
+16° 52′ 53″
M6.5V 0.08 15.14 17.22 260.9884±0.0934[7] tentative radial velocity variation (2010)[34][38] has 2 known planets (2019)[39][40]
Kapteyn's Star (CD−45°1841) 12.8308±0.0008 Pictor* 05h 11m 40.6s
−45° 01′ 06″
M1.5VI[5] 0.281 8.84 10.87 254.1986±0.0168[7] two disputed planets (b and c) (2014)[41][42]
Lacaille 8760 (AX Microscopii) 12.9472±0.0018 Microscopium* 21h 17m 15.3s
−38° 52′ 03″
M0.0V[5] 0.60 6.67 8.69 251.9124±0.0352[7] brightest M dwarf star in night sky, flare star
SCR 1845-6357 A 13.0638±0.0070 Pavo* 18h 45m 05.3s
−63° 57′ 48″
M8.5V[5] 0.07 17.39 19.41 249.6651±0.1330[7] [34]
18h 45m 02.6s
−63° 57′ 52″
T6[43] 0.03[5] 13.3 J[31]
Kruger 60
(BD+56°2783)
A 13.0724±0.0052 Cepheus* 22h 27m 59.5s
+57° 41′ 45″
M3.0V[5] 0.271 9.79 11.76 249.5±0.1[44] B flare star
B (DO Cephei) M4.0V[5] 0.176 11.41 13.38
DEN 1048-3956 13.1932±0.0027 Antlia* 10h 48m 14.7s
−39° 56′ 06″
M8.5V[5] 0.08 17.39 19.37 247.2156±0.0512[7] [45][46]
Ross 614
(V577 Monocerotis, Gliese 234)
A (LHS 1849) 13.363±0.040 Monoceros* 06h 29m 23.4s
−02° 48′ 50″
M4.5V[5] 0.223 11.15 13.09 244.07±0.73[47] A flare star
B (LHS 1850) M5.5V 0.111 14.23 16.17
UGPS J0722-0540§ 13.43±0.13 Monoceros 07h 22m 27.3s
–05° 40′ 30″
T9[5] 0.010-0.025 16.52 J[48] 242.8±2.4[49] [50]
Wolf 1061 (Gliese 628, BD−12°4523) 14.0500±0.0016 Ophiuchus 16h 30m 18.1s
−12° 39′ 45″
M3.0V[5] 0.294 10.07 11.93 232.1390±0.0268[7] three planets (b, c, and d) (2015)[51]
Van Maanen's star (Gliese 35, LHS 7)white dwarf 14.0718±0.0011 Pisces* 00h 49m 09.9s
+05° 23′ 19″
DZ7[5] 0.67 12.38 14.21 231.7800±0.0183[7] closest-known free-floating white dwarf,
third-known white dwarf
possible debris disk (1917),
possible planet (b) (2004) (debated)
Gliese 1 (CD−37°15492) 14.1747±0.0022 Sculptor* 00h 05m 24.4s
−37° 21′ 27″
M1.5 V[5] 0.45-0.48 8.55 10.35 230.0970±0.0362[7]
L 1159-16 (TZ Arietis, Gliese 83.1) 14.5780±0.0046 Aries 02h 00m 13.2s
+13° 03′ 08″
M4.5V[5] 0.14 12.27 14.03 223.7321±0.0699[7] flare star, has two known planets (b and c) and one candidate (d)[13]
Wolf 424
(FL Virginis, LHS 333, Gliese 473)
A 14.595±0.031 Virgo 12h 33m 17.2s
+09° 01′ 15″
M5.5Ve 0.143 13.18 14.97 223.4775±0.4665[7] flare stars
B M7Ve 0.131 13.17 14.96
Gliese 687 (LHS 450, BD+68°946) 14.8395±0.0014 Draco 17h 36m 25.9s
+68° 20′ 21″
M3.0V[5] 0.401 9.17 10.89 219.7898±0.0210[7] possible flare star, two planets (b) (2014)[52] and (c) (2020)[53]
Gliese 674 (LHS 449) 14.8492±0.0018 Ara* 17h 28m 39.9s
−46° 53′ 43″
M3.0V[5] 0.35 9.38 11.09 219.6463±0.0262[7] one planet (b) (2007)[54]
LHS 292 (LP 731-58) 14.8706±0.0041 Sextans* 10h 48m 12.6s
−11° 20′ 14″
M6.5V[5] 0.08 15.60 17.32 219.3302±0.0602[7] flare star
LP 145-141 (WD 1142-645, Gliese 440)white dwarf 15.1226±0.0013 Musca* 11h 45m 42.9s
−64° 50′ 29″
DQ6[5] 0.75 11.50 13.18 215.6753±0.0181[7]
Gliese 1245 A (G 208-44 A) 15.2001±0.0034 Cygnus 19h 53m 54.2s
+44° 24′ 55″
M5.5V[5] 0.11 13.46 15.17 214.5745±0.0476[7] flare stars
B (G 208-45) 19h 53m 55.2s
+44° 24′ 56″
M6.0V[5] 0.10 14.01 15.72
C (G 208-44 B) 19h 53m 54.2s
+44° 24′ 55″
M5.5 0.07 16.75 18.46
WISE 1741+2553§ 15.22±0.20 Hercules* 17h 41m 24.2s
+25° 53′ 19″
T9 16.53 J 18.18 J 214.3±2.8[55]
Gliese 876 (Ross 780) 15.2382±0.0025 Aquarius 22h 53m 16.7s
−14° 15′ 49″
M3.5V[5] 0.37 10.17 11.81 214.0380±0.0356[7] four planets (d (2005), c (2001), b (1998), and e (2010))[56]
two possible planets (f and g) (2014) (debated)
WISE 1639-6847§ 15.450±0.041 Triangulum Australe* 16h 39m 40.9s
−68° 47′ 46″
Y0.5 20.57 J 22.10 J 211.11±0.56[57]
LHS 288 (Luyten 143-23) 15.7586±0.0034 Carina 10h 44m 21.2s
−61° 12′ 36″
M5.5V[5] 0.11[5] 13.90 15.51 206.9698±0.0448[7] one tentative planet (b) (2007)[34]
GJ 1002 15.8060±0.0036 Cetus 00h 06m 43.8s
−07° 32′ 22″
M5.5V[5] 0.11 13.76 15.40 206.3500±0.0474[7]
DEN 0255-4700§ 15.877±0.014 Eridanus 02h 55m 03.7s
−47° 00′ 52″
L7.5V[5] 0.025-0.065 22.92 24.44 205.4251±0.1857[7] [46]
Groombridge 1618 (Gliese 380)$ 15.8857±0.0017 Ursa Major 10h 11m 22.1s
+49° 27′ 15″
K7.0V[5] 0.67 6.59 8.16 205.3148±0.0224[7] brightest single red dwarf in night sky, flare star, one suspected debris disk,
one suspected planet (b) (1989) (tentative)
Gliese 412 A 15.9969±0.0026 Ursa Major 11h 05m 28.6s
+43° 31′ 36″
M1.0V[5] 0.48 8.77 10.34 203.8876±0.0332[7]
B (WX Ursae Majoris) 11h 05m 30.4s
+43° 31′ 18″
M5.5V[5] 0.10 14.48 16.05 flare star
AD Leonis 16.1939±0.0024 Leo 10h 19m 36.4s
+19° 52′ 10″
M3.0V[5] 0.39-0.42 9.32 10.87 201.4064±0.0296[7] flare star, 1 refuted planet (b[13] in 2020)[58]
Gliese 832 16.2005±0.0019 Grus* 21h 33m 34.0s
−49° 00′ 32″
M1.5 V[5] 0.45 8.66 10.20 201.3252±0.0237[7] possible flare star, two planets (b (2008) and c (2014))[59][60]
System Star or (sub-) brown dwarf Distance[6]
(Light-years (±err))
Constellation Coordinates:
RADec
(Ep J2000, Eq J2000)[5]
Stellar
class
Mass
M
Apparent Absolute Parallax
(mas (±err))

[5][note 1]
Notes and additional
references
Designation Magnitude (mV[5] or mJ)

Distant future and past encounters[edit]

Graph of the distances of various stars from the Sun during the past 20,000 to future 80,000 years.
Distances of the nearest stars from 20,000 years ago until 80,000 years in the future

Over long periods of time, the slow independent motion of stars change in both relative position and in their distance from the observer. This can cause other currently distant stars to fall within a stated range, which may be readily calculated and predicted using accurate astrometric measurements of parallax and total proper motions, along with spectroscopically determined radial velocities. Although predictions can be extrapolated back into the past or forward into the future, they are subject to increasing significant cumulative errors over very long periods.[4] Inaccuracies of these measured parameters make determining the true minimum distances of any encountering stars or brown dwarfs fairly difficult.[61]

One of the first stars known to approach the Sun particularly close is Gliese 710. The star, whose mass is roughly half that of the Sun, is currently 62 light-years from the Solar System. It was first noticed in 1999 using data from the Hipparcos satellite, and was estimated will pass less than 1.3 light-years (0.40 pc) from the Sun in 1.4 million years.[62] With the release of Gaia's observations of the star, it has since been refined to a much closer 0.178 light-years (0.055 pc), close enough to significantly disturb objects in the Oort cloud, which extends out to 1.2 light-years (0.37 pc) from the Sun.[63]

The second-closest object known to approach the Sun was only discovered in 2018 after Gaia's second data release, known as 2MASS J0610-4246. Its approach has not been fully described due to it being a distant binary star with a red dwarf, but almost certainly passed less than 1 light-year from the Solar System roughly 1.16 million years ago.

Stars that are known to have passed or will pass within 5 light-years of the Sun in the past or future[64][65][66]
Star name HIP
number
Minimum distance
(light-years)
Date of approach
in thousands of years
Current distance
(light-years)
Stellar classification Mass in M Current
apparent magnitude
Current Constellation Current
Right ascension
Current
Declination
Gliese 710 89825 0.167±0.012 1296+24
−23
62.248±0.020 K7V 0.4–0.6 9.6 Serpens 18h 19m 50.843s −01° 56′ 18.98″
HD 7977 N/A 0.478+0.104
−0.078
−2764+28
−29
246.74±0.60 G0V ~1.2 9.04 Cassiopeia 01h 20m 31.597s +61° 52′ 57.08″
Scholz's star and companion brown dwarf N/A 0.82+0.37
−0.22
−78.5±0.7 22.2±0.2 A: M9V
B: T5
A: 0.095
B: 0.063
18.3 Monoceros 07h 20m 03.20s −08° 46′ 51.2″
2MASS J0628+1845 N/A 1.61+0.28
−0.24
1720+150
−130
272.28±0.80 M2.5V 0.28 16.2 Gemini 06h 28m 11.593s +18° 45′ 12.91″
2MASS J0805+4624 N/A 1.610+0.099
−0.092
−363+13
−14
238.1±1.0 M3V 0.25 17.0 Lynx 08h 05m 29.038s +46° 24′ 51.78″
CD-69 2001 N/A 1.616+0.070
−0.068
−1907±10 332.61±0.55 K4V 0.61 11.13 Indus 21h 40m 31.514s −69° 25′ 14.58″
HD 49995 N/A 1.70+0.23
−0.20
−4034+94
−98
439.74±0.59 A: F3V
B: M1V
A: 1.48
B: 0.49
8.78 Canis Major 06h 50m 20.810s −18° 37′ 30.58″
2MASS J0621-0101 N/A 1.71+0.46
−0.39
−3206+68
−66
428.8±3.1 G5V 0.96 11.9 Orion 06h 21m 34.807s −01° 01′ 55.01″
LSPM J2146+3813 N/A 1.8557±0.0048 84.59±0.19 22.9858±0.0034 M5V ~0.15 10.82 Cygnus 21h 46m 22.285s +38° 13′ 03.12″
2MASS J0455+1144 N/A 1.94+0.16
−0.15
1702+58
−54
349.50±0.80 M0V 0.50 15.3 Orion 04h 55m 21.427s +11° 44′ 41.25″
2MASS J0734-0637 N/A 1.950±0.021 −554.6±3.3 130.66±0.12 M0V 0.50 12.9 Monoceros 07h 34m 39.097s −06° 37′ 12.21″
2MASS J1151-0313 N/A 1.98+0.20
−0.18
1017+60
−54
125.88±0.41 M3.5V 0.23 15.3 Virgo 11h 51m 37.434s −03° 13′ 45.24″
UCAC4 076-006432 N/A 2.042+0.034
−0.033
−893.8+7.9
−8.0
212.41±0.15 mid K ~0.6 12.69 Mensa 06h 34m 29.385s −74° 49′ 47.12″
2MASS J0120+4739 N/A 2.25+0.17
−0.15
473+27
−25
237.56±0.66 M3.5V 0.25 16.5 Andromeda 01h 20m 04.561s +47° 39′ 46.56″
TYC 6760-1510-1 N/A 2.46+0.19
−0.18
−1708+44
−47
102.89±0.16 M1.5V 0.58 11.5 Hydra 15h 00m 09.536s −29° 05′ 27.67″
UCAC2 15719371 N/A 2.46±0.10 −4282+70
−73
280.80±0.26 K4V 0.66 12.58 Antlia 09h 44m 09.884s −37° 45′ 31.09″
TYC 1662-1962-1 N/A 2.637+0.055
−0.054
−1536.6+9.0
−9.1
286.51±0.40 Early K ~0.8 10.95 Vulpecula 21h 14m 32.911s +21° 53′ 32.76″
HD 179939 94512 2.65±0.17 3020±25 334.32±0.88 A3V 1.7 7.23 Aquila 19h 14m 10.043s +07° 45′ 50.72″
BD-21 1529 N/A 2.701+0.059
−0.058
−1660.1±6.3 368.48±0.56 G5V ~0.95 9.67 Canis Major 06h 37m 48.004s −21° 22′ 21.94″
2MASS J1310-1307 N/A 2.79+0.59
−0.47
−1520+150
−190
433.0±2.6 M2.5V 0.34 16.3 Virgo 13h 10m 30.804s −13° 07′ 33.55″
UPM J1121-5549 N/A 2.803±0.020 −282.5+1.6
−1.7
72.498±0.029 M3V 0.29 13.5 Centaurus 11h 21m 18.136s −55° 49′ 17.77″
UCAC4 464-006057 N/A 2.812+0.052
−0.051
932±11 101.570±0.086 Early M ~0.4 11.73 Taurus 04h 09m 02.050s +02° 45′ 38.32″
UCAC4 213-008644 N/A 2.91+0.13
−0.12
−306+12
−13
80.987±0.048 M5.0 0.17 16.4 Puppis 06h 21m 54.714s −47° 25′ 31.33″
Gliese 3649 N/A 3.016±0.024 −520.4±3.1 54.435±0.023 M1 0.49 10.85 Leo 11h 12m 38.97s +18° 56′ 05.4″
Ross 248 N/A 3.0446±0.0077 38.500±0.096 10.3057±0.0014 M6V 0.136 12.29 Andromeda 23h 41m 54.99s +44° 10′ 40.8″
2MASS J1921-1244 N/A 3.08+0.21
−0.19
−3490+120
−130
376.46±0.73 K6V 0.69 12.46 Sagittarius 19h 21m 58.124s −12° 43′ 58.61″
Proxima Centauri 70890 3.123±0.015 28.65±0.27 4.24646±0.00028 M5Ve 0.15 11.05 Centaurus 14h 29m 42.949s −62° 40′ 46.14″
TYC 9387-2515-1 N/A 3.220+0.081
−0.079
−1509.1+8.6
−8.7
401.96±0.54 K1V 0.86 11.45 Mensa 06h 18m 54.643s −80° 19′ 16.54″
Alpha Centauri AB A: 71683
B: 71685
3.242±0.060 29.63+1.00
−0.98
4.321±0.024 A: G2V
B: K1V
A: 1.100
B: 0.907[67]
A: -0.01
B: +1.33
Centaurus 14h 39m 36.495s −60° 50′ 02.31″
Gliese 445 57544 3.3400±0.0051 46.341±0.065 17.1368±0.0017 M4 0.15? 10.8 Camelopardalis 11h 47m 41.377s +78° 41′ 28.18″
2MASS J1638-6355 N/A 3.37+0.29
−0.28
−1428+21
−22
468.5±4.2 K2V 0.82 12.44 Triangulum Australe 16h 38m 21.759s −63° 55′ 13.16″
2MASS J0542+3217 N/A 3.43+0.75
−0.71
5823+89
−87
884.6±2.4 A: G4V
B: K0V
A: 1.01
B: 0.85
12.80 Auriga 05h 42m 38.349s +32° 17′ 29.85″
2MASS J0625-2408 N/A 3.700+0.082
−0.080
−1874±14 534.88±0.93 K/M ~0.5 12.91 Canis Major 06h 25m 42.744s −24° 08′ 35.02″
Barnard's Star 87937 3.7682±0.0031 11.735±0.013 5.96290±0.00044 sdM4 0.144 9.54 Ophiuchus 17h 57m 48.498s +04° 41′ 36.25″
BD+05 1792 N/A 3.965±0.040 −962.7±3.0 239.73±0.33 G2V 1.07 8.58 Gemini 07h 48m 07.037s +05° 27′ 22.51″
2MASS J2241-2759 N/A 4.05±0.16 −2810+37
−38
411.06±0.76 K7V ~0.5 12.28 Piscis Austrinus 22h 41m 50.996s −27° 59′ 47.04″
2MASS J1724-0522 N/A 4.15+0.26
−0.25
3058+54
−52
489.5±1.3 K0V 0.86 12.73 Ophiuchus 17h 24m 55.056s −05° 22′ 11.45″
StKM 1-554 N/A 4.217+0.036
−0.035
−549.9+2.9
−3.0
151.97±0.19 M0V 0.65 12.17 Orion 05h 14m 01.871s +05° 22′ 56.26″
Gliese 3379 N/A 4.227±0.024 −157.43+0.93
−0.94
16.9861±0.0027 M3.5V 0.19 11.31 Orion 06h 00m 03.824s +02° 42′ 22.97″
2MASS J1936+3627 N/A 4.23+0.62
−0.57
3830+120
−110
671.6±3.4 G5.5V 0.95 12.2 Cygnus 19h 36m 57.294s +36° 27′ 57.71″
2MASS J0710+5228 N/A 4.303±0.039 507.6+3.8
−3.7
90.949±0.050 M3V 0.33 12.52 Lynx 07h 10m 52.167s +52° 28′ 18.49″
HD 146248 N/A 4.341+0.040
−0.039
−1141.5±3.7 334.87±0.47 G2/3IV 1.23 9.47 Triangulum Australe 16h 19m 27.875s −64° 50′ 34.38″
2MASS J1724+0355 N/A 4.37±0.12 1991+38
−37
254.99±0.26 G8V 0.85 12.54 Ophiuchus 17h 24m 34.633s +03° 55′ 26.75″
StKM 1-1456 N/A 4.396±0.043 1240.2+6.9
−6.8
144.934±0.095 A: K5V
B: M8V
A: 0.81
B: 0.09
10.58 Hercules 17h 17m 31.118s +15° 34′ 55.35″
Zeta Leporis 27288 4.43+0.33
−0.30
−878+42
−46
72.81±0.40 A2Vann 2.0 3.55 Lepus 05h 46m 57.341s −14° 49′ 19.02″
Lalande 21185 54035 4.6807±0.0055 21.973±0.033 8.30437±0.00068 M2V 0.39 7.52 Ursa Major 11h 03m 20.194s +35° 58′ 11.55″
HD 68814 40317 4.724+0.090
−0.089
−2242±13 259.85±0.30 G6V 0.98 9.57 Hydra 08h 13m 57.112s −04° 03′ 12.56″
2MASS J1941-4602 N/A 4.814+0.050
−0.049
−456.5+4.1
−4.2
66.848±0.033 M4-M6 ~0.15 12.4 Telescopium 19h 41m 53.18s −46° 02′ 31.4″


Schematic view to scale of past and future close approaches of stars to the Sun (Up to 4.5 light-years)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Parallaxes given by RECONS are a weighted mean of values in the sources given, as well as measurements by the RECONS program.

References[edit]

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