Nebraska Medicine

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Nebraska Medicine
Formerly
Nebraska Health System, The Nebraska Medical Center
Private not-for-profit
IndustryHealthcare
PredecessorBishop Clarkson Hospital, University Hospital
Founded1997, in Omaha, Nebraska, United States
Headquarters
Number of locations
2 hospitals, 39 specialty and primary care clinics
Areas served
Nebraska, primarily Omaha and Bellevue
Key people
James Linder (CEO)
Jeffrey Gold (chairman)
ServicesHealth care
Number of employees
8,000 (2019)
Websitenebraskamed.com

Nebraska Medicine (formerly, The Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska Health System), is a private not-for-profit American healthcare company based in Omaha, Nebraska.[1] The company was created as Nebraska Health System (NHS) in 1997, when Bishop Clarkson Hospital merged with the adjacent University Hospital in midtown Omaha. Renamed The Nebraska Medical Center in 2003, in 2014 the company merged with UNMC Physicians and Bellevue Medical Center to become Nebraska Medicine.[2] The company has full ownership of two hospitals and 39 specialty and primary care clinics in and around Omaha, with partial ownership in two rural hospitals and a specialty hospital. Nebraska Medicine's main campus, Nebraska Medicine - Nebraska Medical Center, has 718 beds, while its Bellevue Medical Center campus has 91 beds.[3]

The company operates the largest of only four dedicated biocontainment units in the United States,[4] and is particularly recognized for programs in fields such as organ transplantation,[5] cancer treatment, gastroenterology, neurology, neurosurgery, COPD, heart bypass surgery, heart failure treatment, and hip replacement. Ranked the No. 1 hospital in Nebraska and in Omaha by U.S. News & World Report in 2019,[6] the publication also ranked Nebraska Medicine No. 35 in the United States for cancer and the best hospital in Nebraska.[6] Nebraska Medicine operates as an independent clinical partner of the University of Nebraska Medical Center.[7]

History[edit]

1869-1996: Nebraska Health System[edit]

Nebraska Medicine's predecessor company, Nebraska Health System (NHS), was formed in 1997 through the merger of Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital and University Hospital.[2] Adjacent to the University of Nebraska's medical campus in midtown Omaha;[8] both founding entities had been active in Nebraska for some time. Clarkson Hospital had been founded in 1869 and University Hospital in 1917, making Nebraska Health System the oldest healthcare organization in the state of Nebraska. In 1998, Nebraska Health System opened the Lied Transplant Center on its Omaha campus.[2]

2003-2013: The Nebraska Medical Center[edit]

Nebraska Health System was renamed The Nebraska Medical Center in 2003,[2] with the adjacent University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) remaining its primary clinical partner.[9] UNMC had been founded in 1881 as the Omaha Medical College before associating with the University of Nebraska system.[7] In 2005, The Nebraska Medical Center opened the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit (NBU) as a collaboration with UNMC,[10] also opening the Hixson-Lied Center on the Omaha campus. The Nebraska Medical Center's nearby Village Pointe Cancer Center opened in 2008.[3] Nebraska Medicine was named one of America’s best hospitals in U.S. News & World Report’s 2008 publication for Cancer and Neurology & Neurosurgery. In 2010, The Nebraska Medical Center opened Bellevue Medical Center, a secondary hospital in nearby Bellevue, Sarpy County.[2] The following year, the company began to implement a new $87 million electronic health record system.[11]

2014-2016: Nebraska Medicine[edit]

In October 2014, it was announced that The Nebraska Medical Center, Bellevue Medical Center and UNMC Physicians would begin operating under Nebraska Medicine as one entity. UNMC Physicians, a clinical group formed in 1971,[2] brought 39 ambulatory clinics and a physician’s practice into Nebraska Medicine.[12] The hospitals and clinics within the Nebraska Medicine network were also renamed, as Nebraska Medicine – Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska Medicine – Bellevue, Nebraska Medicine – Village Pointe, Nebraska Medicine – Eagle Run, and others. UNMC remained independent, but changed its branding to reflect the new Nebraska Medicine logo.[13]

On March 23, 2015, Rosanna Morris was named interim CEO of Nebraska Medicine[14] and Bradley Britigan was made interim president. Daniel DeBehnke succeeded as CEO and president in May 2016.[15] In 2016, Nebraska Medicine finished an expansion of its Village Pointe location, expanding on an outpatient surgery center and clinics.[16]

Nebraska Medicine paid $130 million in January 2016 to fully purchase Bellevue Medical Center, which it had previously been leasing. At the time, Nebraska Medicine also was partial owner of the Nebraska Orthopaedic Hospital in Omaha.[17] In February 2016, Nebraska Medicine reached Stage 7 on the Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM) developed by HIMSS Analytics.[11] In 2016, Nebraska Medicine finished an expansion of its Village Pointe location, expanding on an outpatient surgery center and clinics.[18] After physicians at Internal Medical Associates requested the merge, in July 2016, Nebraska Medicine assumed operations of Internal Medical Associates in Grand Island, Nebraska.[19]

2017-2019[edit]

In January 2017, Nebraska Medicine announced that it would open Nebraska Medicine-Chalco, in Chalco, as a primary care clinic and its fourth urgent care location,[20] at which point it had around 40 clinic locations. That May, Nebraska Medicine opened the Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, a partly public partnership with various state and county investors.[21] In September 2017, Nebraska Medicine closed its burn unit due to reduced patient volume. Opened in 1995, the unit had treated 100 burn patients annually.[22] In August 2018, James Linder was appointed CEO.[23] Nebraska Medicine and UNMC sent a team of infectious disease experts to Uganda in September 2018 to train local healthcare workers.[24] At that time, Nebraska Medicine was also "working with several Nebraska hospitals to help implement electronic medical records." Nebraska Medicine had previously provided regional laboratory services to local hospitals, since 1998, also maintaining related records.[25]

In 2018, the Nebraska Medicine network had 809 licensed beds.[9] In 2018, Nebraska Medicine – Elkhorn primary care location, as well as a new building for the Nebraska Medicine - Fontenelle primary care location, opened.[26] Nebraska Medicine moved its Clarkson Family Medicine Clinic to a larger building in downtown Omaha,[27] also performing the first bloodless stem cell transplant in the state.[28] By 2019, some Nebraska Medicine hospital rooms featured virtual reality headsets to teach patients about procedures.[29] Nebraska Medicine served as an organizer of the Flood Relief Donation Management Center that March,[30] collecting donated items from corporations to help with relief efforts for flooding in Nebraska.[29] Nebraska Medicine was awarded the "Nebraska's Safest Companies" award from the Nebraska chapter of the National Safety Council, in 2019.[5] In June 2019, Nebraska Medicine was also named the best employer in Nebraska by Forbes.[31]

Operations and staff[edit]

Nebraska Medicine's primary care clinics use a "patient-centered medical home model of care," which involves giving patients a "team" of healthcare providers,[20] including "primary care doctors, pharmacists, nutritionists, behavioral health professionals and other providers",[27] such as social workers and dietitians.[20] As of 2019, Nebraska Medicine had 8,000 employees and around 1,000 affiliated physicians working out of its two major hospitals and various outpatient clinics.[3] Nebraska Medicine operates emergency departments out of its two major hospitals in Omaha and Bellevue, and partially owns two rural hospitals and a specialty hospital. Nebraska Medicine also owns and operates 39 specialty and primary care clinics.[3]

Nebraska Medicine operates emergency departments out of its two major hospitals in Omaha and Bellevue, and also partially owns two rural hospitals and a specialty hospital. The company has full ownership of two hospitals and 39 specialty and primary care clinics in and around Omaha, with partial ownership in two rural hospitals and a specialty hospital. Nebraska medicine's main campus, Nebraska Medical Center, is located in midtown Omaha and anchored by several multi-story buildings and facilities. The company operates the largest of only four dedicated biocontainment units in the United States.[4] Additional facilities in Omaha include nine outpatient clinics, Nebraska Orthopaedic Hospital and Bellevue Medical Center.[32] Overall the company has 809 licensed beds. Primarily serving the metro Omaha area and several counties in Iowa, in 2018, it had 31,004 discharges, 426,923 outpatient visits, and 91,800 emergency room visits.[3]

Certifications and programs[edit]

In 2019, U.S. News & World Report ranked Nebraska Medicine as the best regional hospital in Nebraska. It also ranked highly in the treatment of cancer, gastroenterology, neurology, neurosurgery, COPD, colon cancer surgery, heart bypass surgery, heart failure treatment, and hip replacement.[33] The company has full ownership of two hospitals and 39 specialty and primary care clinics in and around Omaha, with partial ownership in two rural hospitals and a specialty hospital. Nebraska Medicine's main campus, Nebraska Medicine - Nebraska Medical Center, has 718 beds, while its Bellevue Medical Center campus has 91 beds.[3] The company operates the largest of only four dedicated biocontainment units in the United States,[4] and is particularly recognized for programs in fields such as organ transplantation[5] cancer treatment, gastroenterology, neurology, neurosurgery, COPD, heart bypass surgery, heart failure treatment, and hip replacement. Ranked the No. 1 hospital in Nebraska and in Omaha by U.S. News & World Report in 2019. The publication also ranked Nebraska Medicine No. 35 in the United States for cancer and the best hospital in Nebraska.[6]

Nebraska Medicine is known internationally for bone marrow and organ transplantation.[5] Nebraska Medicine's stroke program,[34] heart failure program and acute myocardial infarction program[3] received the "Gold Seal of Approval" certification from The Joint Commission in 2017.[34] The Joint Commission also certified the company in inpatient diabetes and lung transplantation in 2017,[3] and the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Nebraska Medicine was certified as a level 4 epilepsy center by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers, the highest rating.[35]

Facilities[edit]

Outpatient and urgent care clinics[edit]

Nebraska Medicine operates two hospitals and 39 specialty and primary care clinics.[3] It also operates five urgent care clinics in Omaha and surrounding cities: Chalco Health Center, Eagle Run Health Center, Family Medicine at Bellevue Clinic, Midtown Health Center, and Plattsmouth Immediate Care Clinic in Plattsmouth.[32]

Nebraska Medicine – Nebraska Medical Center[edit]

Nebraska Medical Center
Geography
LocationOmaha, Nebraska,  Omaha, Nebraska
Organisation
Hospital type Private non-profit
Affiliated universityNebraska Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Services
Emergency departmentYes
Beds718
HelipadYes
History
Founded1997
Links
Website Nebraska Medical Center

Commonly known as Nebraska Medical Center,[3] Nebraska Medicine - Nebraska Medical Center serves as Nebraska Medicine's main campus. Located in midtown Omaha, it is the largest hospital in Nebraska,[2] with 718 beds, as of 2019. It is licensed as an acute-care facility[36] with an emergency department and a number of specialty clinics,[32] and employs physicians in "all major specialties and services". The facility is the primary teaching hospital for the adjacent University of Nebraska Medical Center and, although they share campuses,[36] they operate independently. A number of buildings on the Nebraska Medical Center campus are operated by UNMC, for example the Eppley Cancer Institute.[7] In 2018, Becker's Hospital Review named Nebraska Medicine – Nebraska Medical Center to its "100 Great Hospitals in America" list for the fifth consecutive year,[37] ranking again in 2019.[9]

Some notable Nebraska Medicine-affiliated facilities on the Nebraska Medical Center campus include:[36]

  • Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center - Associated with both Nebraska Medicine and UNMC,[7] Nebraska Medicine and UNMC spent $323 million on the center's construction, which opened to the public in June 2017.[2]
  • Hixson-Lied Center for Clinical Excellence – The Nebraska Medical Center broke ground on the project in 2002, opening the $56.5 million facility to the public in 2005. The building covers 165,000 square feet (15,300 m2) over four floors and houses emergency, radiology, cardiology, surgery and the newborn intensive care unit.[39]
  • Diabetes Center - The Diabetes Center at Nebraska Medicine combines counseling, education, research, and clinical care in treating diabetes.[40] It opened in 2008.[41]
  • Lied Transplant Center - A partnership between UNMC and Nebraska Medicine, Lied Transplant Center was first built in 1999. The building houses a clinic, research labs and inpatient hospital units.[42]
  • Lauritzen Outpatient Center - Opened in 2016, it has an ambulatory surgery center, clinics, a pharmacy and a laboratory.[43]

Bellevue Medical Center[edit]

In 2010, Nebraska Medicine partnered with UNMC Physicians[2] and a group of physicians from Bellevue, Nebraska to open that city's first civilian hospital.[44]

Village Pointe Health Center[edit]

The Village Pointe Health Center hospital campus is located near Village Pointe shopping center,[32] with services in three buildings, including a number of specialty clinics.[45]

OrthoNebraska[edit]

Nebraska Orthopaedic Hospital opened in April 2004 under the ownership of several practicing orthopedic surgeons and Nebraska Medicine, which remained a partial owner when it was renamed OrthoNebraska, in 2017.[46]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Overview of Nebraska Medicine-Nebraska Medical Center". USnews.com. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "History of Nebraska Medicine". Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2010-01-04.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Fast Facts About Nebraska Medicine". Nebraskamed.com. Nebraska Medicine.
  4. ^ a b c d e Courage, Katherine Harmon (October 24, 2014). "Inside the 4 U.S. Biocontainment Hospitals That Are Stopping Ebola  ". Scientific American.
  5. ^ a b c d "Awards". Nebraskamed.com . Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  6. ^ a b c "Nebraska Medical Center ". US News. 2019. Retrieved 2020-01-07.
  7. ^ a b c d "About Us / Fast Facts". UNMC.com . UNMC. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  8. ^ Anderson, Julie (2016-12-15). "Nebraska Medicine's new $71 million Lauritzen Outpatient Center has patient ease in mind". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  9. ^ a b c "100 great hospitals in America". Beckers Hospital Review. 2019-04-12. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  10. ^ a b c "Biocontainment Unit  ". Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  11. ^ a b Landi, Heather (2016-02-03). "Nebraska Medicine Receives Stage 7 Recognition". HC Innovation Group. Retrieved 2020-01-07.
  12. ^ a b Wells, Aaron. "Nebraska Medicine's Transformational Thinking - A proactive approach to medicine has kept Nebraska Medicine at the forefront of healthcare in the U.S." thebossmagazine.com . BOSS Magazine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  13. ^ Curtain, Eugene (2014-10-15). "Bellevue Medical Center gets new name, logo". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  14. ^ "5 questions with Rosanna Morris, interim CEO of Nebraska Medicine". Becker's Hospital Review. 2015-09-15. Retrieved 2020-01-07.
  15. ^ Dunker, Chris (2016-05-16). "Nebraska Medicine names new CEO". Journalstar.com. Lincoln Journal-Star. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  16. ^ Anderson, Julie (2016-12-15). "Nebraska Medicine's new $71 million Lauritzen Outpatient Center has patient ease in mind". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  17. ^ Ruggles, Rick (2016-01-16). "Nebraska Medicine buys Bellevue hospital it leased". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  18. ^ Anderson, Julie (2016-12-15). "Nebraska Medicine's new $71 million Lauritzen Outpatient Center has patient ease in mind". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  19. ^ "Nebraska Medicine to assume operations of Internal Medical Associates". TheIndependent.com The Grand Island Independent. 2016-03-28. Retrieved 2020-01-05.
  20. ^ a b c Anderson, Julie  (2017-01-31). "Nebraska Medicine to open Chalco clinic". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  21. ^ Anderson, Julie (2017-05-27). "Nebraska Medicine will be adding hospital, facility charges starting June 13". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  22. ^ "Bellevue Medical Center gets new name, logo". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. 2017-08-18. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  23. ^ "Nebraska Medicine names new CEO". 3Newsnow. KMTV. 2018-08-08. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  24. ^ Anderson, Julie (2018-10-03). "UNMC, Nebraska Medicine team training Ugandan health-care workers screening for Ebola". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  25. ^ Anderson, Julie (August 8, 2018). "Nebraska Medicine replaces CEO, picks new leader familiar in state's medical circles". Omaha World-Herald. Omaha.com. Retrieved 2020-01-05.
  26. ^ Anderson, Julie (2018-03-22). "North Omaha Nebraska Medicine clinic won't move far to add space and hours". Omaha.com. Retrieved 2020-01-05.
  27. ^ a b Anderson, Julie (2018-07-17). "Nebraska Medicine will move Clarkson clinic to downtown Omaha this fall". Omaha.com. Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  28. ^ Barth, Taylor (2018-09-03). "Nebraska Medicine performs first ever bloodless stem cell transplant on Jehovah's Witness". KETV.com. KETV Omaha. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  29. ^ a b Mauro, Erik (March 27, 2019). "Nebraska Medicine using virtual reality for patients". 3newsnow.com . KMTV. Retrieved 2020-01-05.
  30. ^ "Flood Relief Center Established by UNMC/Nebraska Medicine, UNO". KTICradio.com. KTIC. March 25, 2019. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  31. ^ Valet, Vicky (June 5, 2019). "America's Best Employers By State". Forbes. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  32. ^ a b c d "Locations". Nebraskamed.com . Nebraksa Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  33. ^ "Overview of Nebraska Medicine-Nebraska Medical Center". USnews.com. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  34. ^ a b "Stroke treatment at med center nationally recognized ". UNMC.edu. 2017-11-10. Retrieved 2020-01-07.
  35. ^ "Nebraska Medicine Epilepsy Center Earns Highest Designation". Nebraska Medicine. 2017. Retrieved 2020-01-07.
  36. ^ a b c "Nebraska Medical Center". Nebraskamed.com. Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  37. ^ "Nebraska Medicine Named to 100 Great Hospitals List for 5th Time". Nebraskamed.com . Nebraska Medicine. 2018-05-10. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  38. ^ "Nebraska Medicine: A Proud Partner in More Ways than One". Clarkson College. November 11, 2014. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  39. ^ Grinnell, Kelly (2005-10-28). "Hixson-Lied Center for Clinical Excellence is unveiled". unmc.edu. UNMC. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  40. ^ "Diabetes". Nebraskamed.com. Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  41. ^ McMaster, Andrea (April 14, 2008). "Diabetes Center". unmc.edu . UNMC. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  42. ^ "Lied Transplant Center  ". Nebraskamed.com . Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  43. ^ "Lauritzen Outpatient Center ". Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  44. ^ Nebraska Medicine–Bellevue
  45. ^ "Village Pointe Health Center". Nebraskamed.com . Nebraska Medicine. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
  46. ^ Anderson, Julie (May 13, 2017). "Nebraska Orthopaedic Hospital and OrthoWest join under rebranded name OrthoNebraska". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 2020-01-06.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°15′22″N 95°58′39″W / 41.25611°N 95.97750°W / 41.25611; -95.97750