Ned Hanlon (politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search


Ned Hanlon
Portrait of Ned Hanlon, Premier of Queensland
26th Premier of Queensland
Elections: 1947, 1950
In office
7 March 1946 – 15 January 1952
MonarchGeorge VI
GovernorLeslie Wilson
John Lavarack
DeputyTed Walsh
Vince Gair
Preceded byFrank Cooper
Succeeded byVince Gair
12th Deputy Premier of Queensland
In office
16 September 1942 – 7 March 1946
PremierFrank Cooper
Preceded byFrank Cooper
Succeeded byTed Walsh
Party leadership positions
Leader of the Labor Party in Queensland
In office
7 March 1946 – 15 January 1952
DeputyTed Walsh
Vince Gair
Preceded byFrank Cooper
Succeeded byVince Gair
Deputy Leader of the Labor Party in Queensland
In office
16 September 1942 – 7 March 1946
Preceded byFrank Cooper
Succeeded byJack Duggan
Cabinet posts
Chief Secretary
In office
7 March 1946 – 17 January 1952
Preceded byFrank Cooper
Succeeded byVince Gair
30th Treasurer of Queensland
In office
27 April 1944 – 7 March 1946
PremierFrank Cooper
Preceded byFrank Cooper
Succeeded byJames Larcombe
Secretary for Health and Home Affairs
In office
21 May 1935 – 27 April 1944
PremierWilliam Forgan Smith
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byTom Foley
Home Secretary
In office
18 June 1932 – 21 May 1935
PremierWilliam Forgan Smith
Preceded byJens Peterson
Succeeded byPosition abolished
Constituency
Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly for Ithaca
In office
8 May 1926 – 15 January 1952
Preceded byJohn Gilday
Succeeded byLeonard Eastment
Personal details
Born
Edward Michael Hanlon

(1887-10-01)1 October 1887
Paddington, Colony of Queensland, British Empire
Died15 January 1952(1952-01-15) (aged 64)
Mater Private Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Cause of deathBronchial pneumonia
Resting placeToowong Cemetery
NationalityAustralian
Spouse(s)
Elizabeth Carver
(m. 1922; death 1946)
Children4; including Pat Hanlon
EducationPetrie Terrace Boys' School
Alma materBrisbane Technical College
Occupation
Military service
Nickname(s)Digger Sergeant
Allegiance Australia
Branch/serviceAustralian Army Emblem.svg Australian Army
Years of service1915–1919
RankSergeant
Unit9th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force
Battles/wars

Edward Michael Hanlon (1 October 1887 – 15 January 1952), known as Ned, was an Australian politician and soldier, who was Premier of Queensland from 1946 to 1952.

Hanlon was born in Brisbane, Colony of Queensland to Irish immigrant parents.[1] He lived there throughout his life. After leaving school, he worked in the railways, and soon became a union official. In the 1912 Brisbane General Strike he played a prominent part as a militant. Between 1915 and 1919 Hanlon served in the 9th Battalion, 3rd Brigade, 1st Division of the Australian Imperial Force, whose traditions and battle honours are proudly carried by the modern 9th Battalion, Royal Queensland Regiment. He served under Captain Cec Carroll during the war, who in 1934 Hanlon (then Minister for Home Affairs) would appoint as the Queensland Police Commissioner.[2]

He entered parliament in 1926, representing the Labor Party as member for Ithaca. After two decades and several cabinet portfolios (notably the Health Ministry, where he worked in tandem with doctor and administrator Sir Raphael Cilento), he became Queensland's Premier, once the septuagenarian Frank Cooper had retired. Over the years Hanlon's outlook mellowed, and he shifted to the political right. Having begun as a union militant, he ended up, as Premier, sending the police to suppress union demonstrations during the 1948 Queensland Railway strike.

On June 17 1951, while in Canberra, Hanlon contracted bronchial pneumonia and spent three weeks in hospital before returning to Queensland on July 5. On 8 August, Hanlon was admitted to the Mater private hospital and received oxygen. After surviving, doctors warned that Hanlon would be ill for a long period of time. Following this, he took six months' leave of absence from the premiership. In October, it appeared that Hanlon was well enough to leave the hospital. However, suffering another setback, Hanlon remained in hopital until his death in January 1952.[3][4]

After his death in January 1952, he was succeeded by Vince Gair, the last leader of the state Labor Party administration which had been in power continuously ever since 1932.

Hanlon was accorded a State funeral[5] which took place from St Stephen's Cathedral to the Toowong Cemetery.[6][7]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ned Hanlon always was a fighter". The Courier-Mail. Archived from the original on 16 January 1952. Retrieved 28 June 2020.
  2. ^ "CARROLL RETIRES". The Courier-mail (3935). Queensland, Australia. 7 July 1949. p. 4. Retrieved 29 November 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "Mr. Hanlon In Weak Condition". The Queensland Times. Archived from the original on 15 January 1952. Retrieved 28 June 2020.
  4. ^ "Ned Hanlon always was a fighter". The Courier-Mail. Archived from the original on 16 January 1952. Retrieved 28 June 2020.
  5. ^ "State Funeral". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane: National Library of Australia. 16 January 1952. p. 1. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
  6. ^ "Family Notices". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane: National Library of Australia. 16 January 1952. p. 12. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
  7. ^ Hanlon Edward Michael Archived 1 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine — Brisbane City Council Grave Location Search. Retrieved 7 January 2015.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Frank Cooper
Premier of Queensland
1946–1952
Succeeded by
Vince Gair
Preceded by
Frank Cooper
Treasurer of Queensland
1944–1946
Succeeded by
James Larcombe
Parliament of Queensland
Preceded by
John Gilday
Member for Ithaca
1926–1952
Succeeded by
Leonard Eastment