Nedim Şener

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Nedim Şener (IPA: [ne̞d̪im ʃe̞ne̞ɾ]; born 1966 in Germany) is a Turkish writer and journalist who has written for the Milliyet (since 1994) and Posta newspapers. He has received a number of journalism awards, including the Turkish Journalists' Association Press Freedom Award, the International Press Institute's World Press Freedom Heroes award, and PEN Freedom of Expression Award. He is particularly known for his 2009 book on the assassination of Hrant Dink, which showed the role of Turkish security.[1] He is under indictment in the Odatv case of the Ergenekon trials because, he believes, his 2009 book alleged that police officers responsible for the Ergenekon investigation were responsible for the Dink murder.

Career[edit]

He started working as a journalist at the İlkhaber newspaper. Later, he wrote for the Dünya newspaper. He joined Milliyet in 1994.

The Turkish Journalists' Association (Türkiye Gazeteciler Cemiyeti) has twice named Şener "journalist of the year." In 1999, he was awarded the Metin Göktepe Journalism Award.

Some of his published books are Altın, İstanbul Altın Borsası ve Dünyadaki Örnekleri, Tepeden Tırnağa Yolsuzluk, and Naylon Holding.[2] Other awards he has won include Pen Awards of Netherlands, and Abdi İpekçi Award.[3][4] In June 2010, Şener was named one of the Vienna-based International Press Institute's World Press Freedom Heroes, along with Lydia Cacho Ribeiro, May Chidiac, Akbar Ganji, Yoani Sánchez, Pap Saine, and Lasantha Wickrematunge.[1]

The Dink Murder and Intelligence Lies[edit]

In January 2009 Şener published a book on the 2007 murder of Hrant Dink, The Dink Murder and Intelligence Lies. In it he alleged that police officers responsible for the Ergenekon investigation were responsible for the murder. The officers in question sued Şener soon after; he was later acquitted.[5] In May 2009 an email to police claimed Şener was part of Ergenekon's propaganda network. Şener has said he believes the email was forged by the officers in question, pointing out that although ten names were mentioned, his were the only telephones to be tapped. The taps did not reveal any incriminating evidence.[6]

In February 2011 a raid on the offices of OdaTV produced documents on the basis of which Şener was (along with a dozen others in the Odatv case of the Ergenekon trials) arrested and charged with collaboration with Ergenekon. Odatv staff said the documents were forgeries planted via a trojan horse. Şener was arrested in March 2011 and held in pre-trial detention for over a year. He was released in March 2012 pending trial.[7][8] The arrest was protested by activists.[9] When the Justice Minister was asked about the arrest, he replied "Whatever I would say would be seen as an intervention in a judicial process."[10]

In 2013, Şener was awarded the International Press Freedom Award of the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists.[11]

Awards and honors[edit]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]