Needle drop (DJing)

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For other uses, see Needle drop (disambiguation).

The needle drop is a technique used in hip hop deejaying. The DJ sets a record spinning, then drops the stylus on the turntable at the exact point where he wants playback to begin without previously cuing up the record.[1] Since there is no time wasted in cuing, the needle drop allows faster movements by the DJ. The needle drop method was developed in the 1970s by Grand Wizzard Theodore at around the same time that he and Grandmaster Flash were pioneering scratching.[1]

Sticker method[edit]

In the sticker method of locating the sample or break, a DJ uses a colored "dot" label to mark the sample to be used. Marking a record involves several steps. The first step is to locate the desired sample. The second step is much more critical; the sample is located, then the record is brought about an inch or two backwards from the beginning of the sample. The dot is carefully placed up against the stylus (needle) and a feather touch is applied to keep the label in place. Too hard of an application may lead to the needle being misplaced on the record, slipping to the next several grooves, an undesired result. After the needle is removed from the dot, the label can be pressed into place more permanently. If the DJ ever wishes to remove the dot, residue can be removed from the record with a record cleaner solution.

Vinyl Record Preview Method[edit]

Part of the traits that make a basic set of DJing skills is the ability to select music. This process to curate a related and meaningful collection of songs together starts by previewing songs. Where a DJ prefers to use Vinyl records, while a record is playing, the process to preview the songs can be quickly achieved by holding the handle of the cartridge on the tone arm, and picking up the needle and gently dropping it further along into the song. If you repeat this quickly, this is also known as "needle dropping".

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Roseman, Jordan. Audio Mashup Construction Kit