Nehirim

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Nehirim
Formation2004; 15 years ago (2004)
FounderJay Michaelson
Extinction2015; 4 years ago (2015)
PurposeLGBT rights

Nehirim was a national community of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) Jews, families, students and allies that was founded in 2004.[1] The organization ceased operations at the end of 2015.[2]

History[edit]

Nehirim was founded in 2004 by Jay Michaelson. He served as Executive Director until 2010, when Michael Hopkins succeeded him.[3] Rabbi Debra Kolodny assumed the role in 2013.[4] Nehirim's Board of Directors includes Rabbi Joel Alter, Rabbi Julia Watts-Belser, Rabbi David Dunn-Bauer and Joel Kushner, PhD.[5]

Nehirim means "lights" in Hebrew.[6][7] The name comes from the Hebrew word Zohar, referring to the lights of heaven and rainbow colors seen at sunset.[8] Its goal is to create and foster a more just and inclusive world based on the values of the Jewish tradition. Nehirim's primary programs are intensive, life-changing weekend retreats and service programming promoting LGBT inclusion and equality.[9] It is also a member of the Coalition for Liberty & Justice organized by Catholics for Choice and the National Council of Jewish Women [10] and the National Religious Leadership Roundtable as part of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force.[11]

Retreats[edit]

Nehirim retreats offer a means for LGBT Jews and their families to connect, learn and grow together.[12] Retreats have included East Coast gatherings at the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut,[13][14] a transgender gathering at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California,[15][16] student retreats at Boston University,[17][18] West Coast gatherings at the Walker Creek Ranch in Petaluma, California,[19] men's summer camps at the Easton Mountain Retreat Center in upstate New York,[20][21] queer Jewish weekends in New York City at the Jewish Community Center of Manhattan,[22] and women's retreats at the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center.[23]

Nehirim's first retreat for LGBT rabbis, rabbinic pastors, cantors, and students was held in 2014 in San Francisco.[24][25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New Options for LGBT Jews". The Bilerico Project. Retrieved 2012-03-03.
  2. ^ "Jewish LGBT Group Nehirim Will Shut Down". Tablet Magazine. Retrieved 2018-12-31.
  3. ^ Ginsberg, Johanna (3 November 2010). "Helping to integrate gay, Jewish identities". New Jersey Jewish News. Retrieved 11 April 2014.
  4. ^ "Meet Our Staff". Nehirim. Retrieved 2014-03-18.
  5. ^ "Board of Directors". Nehirim. Retrieved 2013-03-18.
  6. ^ "Retreat a Guiding Light for LGBT and queer Jews". JWeekly.com. Retrieved 2009-04-23.
  7. ^ Ginsberg, Johanna (3 November 2010). "Helping to integrate gay, Jewish identities". New Jersey Jewish News. Retrieved 11 April 2014.
  8. ^ "Sacred Sexuality: An Interview With Jay Michaelson". JVoices.com. Retrieved 2007-02-20.
  9. ^ "Nehirim Retreat Brings Gay Jews Together To Celebrate Faith And Sexuality". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2014-03-18.
  10. ^ "Coalition for Liberty & Justice". Catholics for Choice. Retrieved 2014-02-01.
  11. ^ "Pro-LGBT Jewish leaders respond to Tel Aviv attack". National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. Archived from the original on 2009-08-09. Retrieved 2009-08-07.
  12. ^ "Nehirim". A Wider Bridge. Retrieved 2014-03-18.
  13. ^ "Nehirim Retreat Brings Gay Jews Together To Celebrate Faith And Sexuality". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2014-03-18.
  14. ^ "The Gifts of Difference". Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center. Retrieved 2010-03-05.
  15. ^ "Transgender Jews Seek Place at table". Jewish Daily Forward. Retrieved 2012-11-14.
  16. ^ "Gathering of the transgender tribe set for Berkeley". JWeekly.com. Retrieved 2012-11-14.
  17. ^ "Nehirim: The Experience of a Lifetime". Rutgers Hillel. Archived from the original on 2014-03-01. Retrieved 2014-02-25.
  18. ^ "Student Retreat Will Celebrate Local LGBTQ Community" (PDF). The Jewish Advocate. Retrieved 2013-03-01.
  19. ^ "Retreat a Guiding Light for LGBT and queer Jews". JWeekly.com. Retrieved 2009-04-23.
  20. ^ "So, a Rabbi Walks Into a Bar. It's Not the Beginning of a Joke, but of a Spiritual Journey". Tablet. Retrieved 2013-11-07.
  21. ^ "Camp Nehirim". Easton Mountain. Retrieved 2013-08-21.
  22. ^ "Nehirim Queer Shabbaton 2013 for LGBT Jews, Friends, and Allies". Gay Cities. Retrieved 2013-10-25.
  23. ^ "Pride Interview: Alyssa Finn and Nehirim". Repair The World. Retrieved 2013-07-09.
  24. ^ "Nehirim Puts On First Ever Retreat for LGBT Rabbis, Cantors & Students in San Francisco". Shalom Life. Archived from the original on 25 December 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  25. ^ "At San Francisco retreat, LGBT clergy survey progress from closets to bimah". Retrieved 27 December 2014.

External links[edit]