Neil Coyle

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Neil Coyle

Official portrait of Neil Coyle MP crop 2.jpg
Coyle in 2019
Member of Parliament
for Bermondsey and Old Southwark
Assumed office
7 May 2015[1]
Preceded bySimon Hughes
Majority16,126 (27.5%)
Southwark Borough Councillor for Newington
In office
6 May 2010 – 22 March 2016
Preceded byJames Gurling
Succeeded byJames Coldwell
Personal details
Born (1978-12-30) 30 December 1978 (age 41)
Luton, England
Political partyLabour
Children1
Alma materUniversity of Hull
WebsiteOfficial website

Neil Alan John Coyle (born 30 December 1978) is a British politician who has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Bermondsey and Old Southwark since 2015. A member of the Labour Party, he previously was elected to Southwark London Borough Council in 2010.[2]

Early life[edit]

Coyle grew up in Luton and is one of six children. He went to Wenlock and Ashcroft schools before being educated at the Bedford School, an independent school for boys founded in 1552.[3] He received a BA in British Politics and Legislative Studies from the University of Hull.[citation needed]

Coyle was elected as a councillor for Newington ward in the Southwark London Borough Council election 2010.[4] As a councillor, he supported the unsuccessful Garden Bridge project, on which his wife worked as a landscape architect.[5] He stood down as a councillor in 2016.[citation needed]

Parliamentary career[edit]

Coyle in 2017

Coyle defeated the Liberal Democrat incumbent, Simon Hughes, to take Bermondsey & Old Southwark at the 2015 general election. He was one of 36 Labour MPs to nominate Jeremy Corbyn as a candidate in the Labour leadership election of 2015.[6] Following his election, he was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Shadow Leader of the House of Commons.[7]

Following the May 2016 elections, he co-wrote an article with Jo Cox which said that they had "come to regret" the decision of voting to make Jeremy Corbyn leader of the opposition.[8] After the article was published, Coyle resigned from the shadow cabinet.[7] He then supported Owen Smith in his unsuccessful attempt to replace Jeremy Corbyn in the 2016 leadership election.[9] Coyle has remained highly critical of Corbyn and has written a series of articles arguing against Corbyn's position on everything from terrorism[10] to Brexit.[citation needed]

In the 2016 referendum on the UK leaving the European Union (EU), Coyle campaigned to remain.[11]

In February 2017, Coyle was one of 47 Labour MPs who defied the party's three-line whip to vote against triggering Article 50 for the UK to leave the EU[12] and has called for it to be revoked.[13] Coyle sits on the Work and Pensions Select Committee.[14] At the 2017 snap general election, Coyle increased his majority.[15]

He chairs the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Wines and Spirits, the secretariat for which is provided by the Wine and Spirit Trade Association, which is based in Coyle's constituency.[16] He also chairs the APPG for Foodbanks, which he established in 2017,[17] as well as those for Ending Homelessness and Counter Extremism.[18][19] He is a member of the Co-operative Party and Progress.[20]

In February 2019, Coyle said that he had declined an invitation to join The Independent Group, later Change UK, a splinter group of centrist Labour and Conservative MPs that formed that month.[21]

Controversial Statements[edit]

Boris Johnson[edit]

Coyle has been criticised for his use of language in public on a number of occasions. In September 2019, Coyle referred to Prime Minister Boris Johnson on British television as "a dick."[22] Following the incident, Coyle spoke with the Southwark News saying his constituents had complained about his use of language, suggesting he doesn't "need to be that crude." Coyle then told the Southwark News, "I will be toning down the language but never the passion."[23]

Brexit and Piers Morgan[edit]

A month after the first incident, Coyle again used inappropriate language on his Twitter account. During the Labour Party Conference, Corbyn made a Brexit statement that the Labour Party would not be immediately backing either leave or remain. Many Labour MP's voiced their concerns, but Coyle went a step further by describing Corbyn's stance as "bullshit."[23]

Coyle again received media coverage after a day of strongly-worded statements in the House of Commons. Labour MPs and their leader, Jeremy Corbyn, were critical of Boris Johnson's use of language, including when Johnson suggested that the best way to honour Jo Cox was to deliver Brexit.[24] Journalist and presenter Piers Morgan then tweeted about the use of Jo Cox's name, saying "Parliament has reached a new low on all sides. Disgraceful." Coyle replied on Twitter in several posts, telling Morgan to "go fuck yourself," while also calling him a "sick little man" and a "scrote."[25] The British media quickly picked up on Coyle's aggressive tone, comparing it to the language of the Prime Minister the previous day.[25]

Jacob Rees-Mogg[edit]

On 25 August 2020, in a now deleted tweet, Coyle wrote "I have spent years warning local people that these fat old racists won't stop blaming the EU when their shit hits the fan. Here they come blaming others. Absolute shitbag racist wankers." This was in response to a tweet by fellow parliamentarian Jacob Rees-Mogg, who had made a post concerning the BBC's decision to censor the traditional performance of Rule Britannia meant to take place during the final evening of the Proms. Coyle followed this tweet up with a further tweet, referring to the song, "If you didn't hate it before, feel free to hate the song now. I've never known anyone but shitlickers like it tbh."[26] Coyle later apologised for his tweets.[27]

Personal life[edit]

Coyle lives in his constituency and is married to a landscape architect. They have one daughter.[28] Coyle has written about the impact on his family of his mother's mental ill-health and the inadequacy of support she receives from social and health services, and how this drives his campaigning work.[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://members.parliament.uk/member/4368/contact
  2. ^ "Bermondsey & Old Southwark Parliamentary constituency". BBC. Archived from the original on 8 May 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2015.
  3. ^ "About". Neil Coyle MP. Archived from the original on 8 May 2019. Retrieved 27 July 2019.
  4. ^ "Local council elections May 2014". southwark.gov.uk. 23 May 2014. Archived from the original on 22 May 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  5. ^ "Neil Coyle on the Garden Bridge". Audioboom. Archived from the original on 27 July 2019. Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  6. ^ "Who nominated who for the 2015 Labour leadership election?". New Statesman. London. 15 June 2015. Archived from the original on 5 July 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  7. ^ a b "MP Neil Coyle quits role in Shadow Cabinet joining others in Labour leadership coup against Jeremy Corbyn". Southwark News. London. 27 June 2016. Archived from the original on 5 August 2019. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  8. ^ Cox, Jo; Coyle, Neil (6 May 2016). "We nominated Jeremy Corbyn for the leadership. Now we regret it". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 20 May 2016. Retrieved 8 May 2016.
  9. ^ "Full list of MPs and MEPs backing challenger Owen Smith". LabourList. 21 July 2016. Archived from the original on 15 July 2019. Retrieved 15 July 2019.
  10. ^ Coyle, Neil. "Neil Coyle: We must give security services what they need to keep us safe". The Evening Standard. Archived from the original on 2 December 2019. Retrieved 5 December 2018.
  11. ^ "EU vote: Where the cabinet and other MPs stand". BBC. 22 June 2019. Archived from the original on 3 October 2017. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  12. ^ "A dozen London Labour MPs in revolt over Corbyn's three line whip on Brexit". London Evening Standard. 1 February 2019. Archived from the original on 5 August 2019. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  13. ^ "Petition to Revoke Article 50 and remain in the EU passes 6 million signatures". iNews. 31 March 2019. Archived from the original on 18 July 2019. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  14. ^ "Work and Pensions Committee - membership". UK Parliament. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 26 April 2016.
  15. ^ Mason, Rowena; Elgot, Jessica (9 June 2017). "Jeremy Corbyn plans alternative Queen's speech challenging May". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 15 May 2018. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
  16. ^ "Neil Coyle MP Announced as new Chair of Wines and Spirits APPG". WSTA (Press release). Archived from the original on 31 July 2019. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  17. ^ "Today I chaired the All Party Parliamentary Group on Foodbanks". Facebook. Neil Coyle. 1 May 2018. Archived from the original on 4 September 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  18. ^ "All Party Parliamentary Group for Ending Homelessness". crisis.org.uk. Archived from the original on 16 May 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  19. ^ "Register of All-Party Parliamentary Groups [as at 31 July 2019]". publications.parliament.uk. 31 July 2019. Archived from the original on 1 August 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  20. ^ "Neil Coyle". Southwark Council. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  21. ^ Johnston, Katharine (20 February 2019). "Neil Coyle turned down chance to join breakaway Independent Group". Southwark News. London. Archived from the original on 4 May 2019. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  22. ^ Johnston, Katherine (4 September 2019). "Bermondsey MP Neil Coyle Defends Calling PM "a d**k"". Southwark News. London.
  23. ^ a b Johnston, Katherine (26 September 2019). "Neil Coyle Launches Stringing Attack on Piers Morgan - After Telling The News He was Swearing Off Bad Language for Good". Southwark News. London. Archived from the original on 27 September 2019. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  24. ^ Sparrow, Andrew (25 September 2019). "Fury as Boris Johnson says best way to honour Jo Cox is to deliver Brexit". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 26 September 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  25. ^ a b Menendez, Elisa (26 September 2019). "MP tells Piers Morgan to go 'f**k yourself' in Twitter spat". Metro. London. Archived from the original on 26 September 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  26. ^ "London Playbook". Politico. London. 25 August 2020. Archived from the original on 26 August 2020. Retrieved 26 August 2020.
  27. ^ "Neil Coyle apologises for foul mouthed twitter rant over rule britannia debate". Southwark News. London. 28 August 2020. Archived from the original on 28 August 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2020.
  28. ^ "About". Neil Coyle MP. Archived from the original on 8 May 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  29. ^ "Schizophrenia has haunted my mum's life – it's time the Mental Health Act gave her the freedom she deserves". The Independent. London. 25 July 2019. Archived from the original on 1 August 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Simon Hughes
Member of Parliament
for Bermondsey and Old Southwark

2015–present
Incumbent